Cover by John Ferguson Smart

Safari, the world’s most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

Find the exact information you need to solve a problem on the fly, or go deeper to master the technologies and skills you need to succeed

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

O'Reilly logo

Running Jenkins as a Stand-Alone Application

You can run the Jenkins server in one of two ways: either as a stand-alone application, or deployed as a standard web application onto a Java Servlet container or application server such as Tomcat, JBoss, or GlassFish. Both approaches have their pros and cons, so we will look at both here.

Jenkins comes bundled as a WAR file that you can run directly using an embedded servlet container. Jenkins uses the lightweight Winstone servlet engine to allow you to run the server out of the box, without having to configure a web server yourself. This is probably the easiest way to get started, allowing you to be up and running with Jenkins in a matter of minutes. It is also a very flexible option, and provides some extra features unavailable if you deploy Jenkins to a conventional application server. In particular, if you are running Jenkins as a stand-alone server, you will be able to install plugins and upgrades on the fly, and restart Jenkins directly from the administration screens.

To run Jenkins using the embedded servlet container, just go to the command line and type the following:

C:\Program Files\Jenkins>
        java -jar jenkins.war [Winstone 2011/07/01 20:54:53] - Beginning extraction from war file [Winstone 2011/07/01 20:55:07] - No webapp classes folder found - C:\Users\john\ .jenkins\war\WEB-INF\classes jenkins home directory: C:\Users\john\.jenkins ... INFO: Took 35 ms to load ... [Winstone 2011/07/01 20:55:08] - HTTP Listener started: port=8080 ...

Find the exact information you need to solve a problem on the fly, or go deeper to master the technologies and skills you need to succeed

Start Free Trial

No credit card required