Cover by John Ferguson Smart

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Downloading and Installing Jenkins

Jenkins is easy to install, and can run just about anywhere. You can run it either as a stand-alone application, or deployed on a conventional Java application server such as Tomcat or JBoss. This first option makes it easy to install and try out on your local machine, and you can be up and running with a bare-bones installation in a matter of minutes.

Since Jenkins is a Java application, you will need a recent version of Java on your machine. More precisely, you will need at least Java 5. In fact, on your build server, you will almost certainly need the full features of the Java Development Kit (JDK) 5.0 or better to execute your builds. If you’re not sure, you can check the version of Java on your machine by executing the java -version command:

$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_17"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_17-b04-248-10M3025)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.3-b01-101, mixed mode)

Jenkins is distributed in the form of a bundled Java web application (a WAR file). You can download the latest version from the Jenkins website (http://jenkins-ci.org—see Figure 3-1) or from the book website. Jenkins is a dynamic project, and new releases come out at a regular rate.

For Windows users, there is a graphical Windows installation package for Jenkins. The installer comes in the form of a ZIP file containing an MSI package for Jenkins, as well as a setup.exe file that can be used to install the .NET libraries if they have not ...

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