Cover by John Ferguson Smart

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Your First Build Job in Action

Once you save your new build job, Jenkins will display the home page for this job (see Figure 2-19). This is where Jenkins displays details about the latest build results and the build history.

If you wait a minute or so, the build should kick off automatically—you can see the stripy progress bar in the Build History section in the bottom left hand corner of Figure 2-19. Or, if you are impatient, you can also trigger the build manually using the Build Now button.

Your first build job running

Figure 2-19. Your first build job running

The build will also now figure proudly on your Jenkins server’s home page (see Figure 2-20). This page shows a summary of all of your build jobs, including the current build status and general state of heath of each of your builds. It tells you when each build ran successfully for the last time, and when it last failed, and also the result of the last build.

Once of Jenkins’s specialities is the way it lets you get an idea of build behavior over time. For example, Jenkins uses a weather metaphor to help give you an idea of the stability of your builds. Essentially, the more your builds fail, the worse the weather gets. This helps you get an idea of whether a particular broken build is an isolated event, or if the build is breaking on a regular basis, in which case it might need some special attention.

You can also manually trigger a build job here, using ...

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