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JavaScript Web Applications

Cover of JavaScript Web Applications by Alex MacCaw Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. JavaScript Web Applications
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    2. Preface
      1. Who Is This Book For?
      2. How This Book Is Organized
      3. Conventions Used in This Book
      4. Accompanying Files
      5. Code Conventions
      6. Holla
      7. Author’s Note
      8. Safari® Books Online
      9. How to Contact Us
    3. 1. MVC and Classes
      1. Early Days
      2. Adding Structure
      3. What Is MVC?
      4. Toward Modularity, Creating Classes
      5. Adding Functions to Classes
      6. Adding Methods to Our Class Library
      7. Class Inheritance Using Prototype
      8. Adding Inheritance to Our Class Library
      9. Function Invocation
      10. Controlling Scope in Our Class Library
      11. Adding Private Functions
      12. Class Libraries
    4. 2. Events and Observing
      1. Listening to Events
      2. Event Ordering
      3. Canceling Events
      4. The Event Object
      5. Event Libraries
      6. Context Change
      7. Delegating Events
      8. Custom Events
      9. Custom Events and jQuery Plug-Ins
      10. Non-DOM Events
    5. 3. Models and Data
      1. MVC and Namespacing
      2. Building an ORM
      3. Adding ID Support
      4. Addressing References
      5. Loading in Data
      6. Populating Our ORM
      7. Storing Data Locally
      8. Adding Local Storage to Our ORM
      9. Submitting New Records to the Server
    6. 4. Controllers and State
      1. Module Pattern
      2. Adding a Bit of Context
      3. State Machines
      4. Routing
    7. 5. Views and Templating
      1. Dynamically Rendering Views
      2. Templates
      3. Binding
    8. 6. Dependency Management
      1. CommonJS
      2. Module Loaders
      3. Wrapping Up Modules
      4. Module Alternatives
      5. FUBCs
    9. 7. Working with Files
      1. Browser Support
      2. Getting Information About Files
      3. File Inputs
      4. Drag and Drop
      5. Copy and Paste
      6. Reading Files
      7. Custom Browse Buttons
      8. Uploading Files
      9. jQuery Drag and Drop Uploader
    10. 8. The Real-Time Web
      1. Real Time’s History
      2. WebSockets
      3. Real-Time Architecture
      4. Perceived Speed
    11. 9. Testing and Debugging
      1. Unit Testing
      2. Drivers
      3. Headless Testing
      4. Distributed Testing
      5. Providing Support
      6. Inspectors
      7. The Console
      8. Using the Debugger
      9. Analyzing Network Requests
      10. Profile and Timing
    12. 10. Deploying
      1. Performance
      2. Caching
      3. Minification
      4. Gzip Compression
      5. Using a CDN
      6. Auditors
      7. Resources
    13. 11. The Spine Library
      1. Setup
      2. Classes
      3. Events
      4. Models
      5. Controllers
      6. Building a Contacts Manager
    14. 12. The Backbone Library
      1. Models
      2. Collections
      3. Views
      4. Controllers
      5. Syncing with the Server
      6. Building a To-Do List
    15. 13. The JavascriptMVC Library
      1. Setup
      2. Classes
      3. Model
      4. Using Client-Side Templates in the View
      5. $.Controller: The jQuery Plug-in Factory
      6. Putting It All Together: An Abstract CRUD List
    16. A. jQuery Primer
      1. DOM Traversal
      2. DOM Manipulation
      3. Events
      4. Ajax
      5. Being a Good Citizen
      6. Extensions
      7. Creating a Growl jQuery Plug-in
    17. B. CSS Extensions
      1. Variables
      2. Mixins
      3. Nested Rules
      4. Including Other Stylesheets
      5. Colors
      6. How Do I Use Less?
    18. C. CSS3 Reference
      1. Prefixes
      2. Colors
      3. Rounded Corners
      4. Drop Shadows
      5. Text Shadow
      6. Gradients
      7. Multiple Backgrounds
      8. Selectors
      9. Transitions
      10. Border Images
      11. Box Sizing
      12. Transformations
      13. Flexible Box Model
      14. Fonts
      15. Graceful Degradation
      16. Creating a Layout
    19. Index
    20. About the Author
    21. Colophon
    22. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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Loading in Data

Unless your web application is entirely restricted to the browser, you’ll need to load in remote data from a server. Typically, a subset of data is loaded when the application starts, and more data is loaded after the interaction. Depending on the type of application and the amount of data, you may be able to load everything you need on the initial page load. This is ideal, so users never have to wait for more data to be loaded. However, this isn’t feasible for a lot of applications because there’s too much data to fit comfortably in a browser’s memory.

Preloading data is crucial to making your application feel slick and fast to your users, keeping any waiting time to a minimum. However, there’s a fine line between preloading data that’s actually accessed and loading redundant data that’s never used. You need to predict what sort of data your users will want (or use metrics once your application is live).

If you’re displaying a paginated list, why not preload the next page so transitions are instant? Or, even better, just display a long list and automatically load and insert data as the list is scrolled (the infinite scroll pattern). The less latency a user feels, the better.

When you do fetch new data, make sure the UI isn’t blocked. Display some sort of loading indicator, but make sure the interface is still usable. There should be very few scenarios, if any, that require blocking the UI.

Data can be present inline in the initial page or loaded with separate HTTP requests ...

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