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Java EE 6 with GlassFish 3 Application Server by David R. Heffelfinger

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Developing our first JSF 2.0 application

To illustrate basic JSF concepts, we will develop a simple application consisting of two Facelet pages and a single managed bean.

Facelets

Like we mentioned in this chapter's introduction, the default view technology for JSF 2.0 is Facelets. Facelets need to be written using standard XML. The most popular way of developing Facelet pages is to use XHTML in conjunction with JSF specific XML namespaces. The following example shows how a typical Facelet page looks like:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8' ?> <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN""http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core"> ...

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