You are previewing IPv6 Mandates: Choosing a Transition Strategy, Preparing Transition Plans, and Executing the Migration of a Network to IPv6.
O'Reilly logo
IPv6 Mandates: Choosing a Transition Strategy, Preparing Transition Plans, and Executing the Migration of a Network to IPv6

Book Description

Here's the guide you need for a smooth transition to IPv6. While every enterprise will have some individual issues to manage, this guide will help you decide on a transition strategy, develop a plan, execute it, and verify progress. You'll understand the common tasks and recognize the risks and limitations of IPv6. Follow the guidelines, use the checklists, and you will find that making the transition is no longer intimidating; in fact, it may even require fewer resources than you anticipate.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. About The Author
  3. Credits
  4. Preface
  5. Acknowledgements
  6. Introduction
    1. Overview of the Book
    2. How This Book Is Organized
    3. Who Should Read this Book
    4. Where Do You Go from Here?
  7. I. Starting with the Basics
    1. 1. What Is IPv6?
      1. 1.1. Meet IPv6
      2. 1.2. Making the Transition from IPv4 to IPv6
      3. 1.3. Looking beyond IPv6
      4. 1.4. Who Should Read This Book?
      5. 1.5. Why IPv6?
        1. 1.5.1. Addressing Every PC, Cell Phone, and Toaster
        2. 1.5.2. Easing Network Load
        3. 1.5.3. Enabling the Future
        4. 1.5.4. Eliminating Configuration Hassles
        5. 1.5.5. Ensuring Quality of Service
      6. 1.6. What Is Driving IPv6 Transition?
        1. 1.6.1. Understanding IPv6 Federal Mandates
        2. 1.6.2. Factoring in Microsoft Vista
        3. 1.6.3. Introducing the NAv6TF
      7. 1.7. Further Reading
      8. 1.8. Testing Your Knowledge
    2. 2. Demystifying IPv6
      1. 2.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 2.2. Exploring the IPv6 Header
        1. 2.2.1. Comparing Modified Fields and Introducing New Fields
        2. 2.2.2. What Fields Are Gone?
        3. 2.2.3. Understanding Extension Headers
      3. 2.3. Grappling with the Huge IPv6 Address Space
        1. 2.3.1. Using Shortcuts to Represent IPv6 Addresses
        2. 2.3.2. Expressing IPv6 Address Spaces
        3. 2.3.3. So, How Big Is Big?
        4. 2.3.4. Managing the Address Space World-Wide
      4. 2.4. Benefiting from Auto-Configuration
        1. 2.4.1. Auto-Configuring the Local Subnet
        2. 2.4.2. Limiting Auto-Configuration to Reduce Risk
      5. 2.5. Testing Your Knowledge
    3. 3. The Current IPv6 Landscape
      1. 3.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 3.2. Casting Fresh Eyes on the OMB Mandate
      3. 3.3. How Quickly Is IPv6 Being Adopted?
        1. 3.3.1. Looking at the Historical Data
        2. 3.3.2. Analyzing the Adoption Data for Annual Growth
        3. 3.3.3. Analyzing the Compounding of the Adoption Rate
        4. 3.3.4. Portending a Bumpy Road Ahead for IPv6 Adoption
      4. 3.4. Announcing Two Major Transition Enablers
      5. 3.5. Assessing the State of IPv6 Hacking
        1. 3.5.1. Introducing the First IPv6 Attack Toolkit
        2. 3.5.2. Dealing with Hacker Tools and Attack Kits
      6. 3.6. Testing Your Knowledge
  8. II. Planning Your Transition
    1. 4. Choosing When to Make A Transition and How
      1. 4.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 4.2. Taking the FUD Out of IPv6 Transition
      3. 4.3. Choosing an IPv6 Transition Strategy
      4. 4.4. Choosing to Start Now and Move Slowly
        1. 4.4.1. Moving Capabilities, Not Just Systems
        2. 4.4.2. Looking Back at the Good Old Days
        3. 4.4.3. Returning to the Here and Now
        4. 4.4.4. Grasping the Big Picture for Your Organization
        5. 4.4.5. Creating Site- and Function-Specific Plans
        6. 4.4.6. Coordinating Plans across the Enterprise
        7. 4.4.7. Connecting IPv6 Islands
      5. 4.5. Choosing a Quick Transition for Later
        1. 4.5.1. Accepting that IPv6 Is in Your Network Now
        2. 4.5.2. Discovering IPv6 in Your Pre-Transition Network
        3. 4.5.3. Planning the "Big-Bang"
        4. 4.5.4. Curbing Unmanaged IPv6 Deployment until You're Ready
        5. 4.5.5. Accounting for Existing Authorized IPv6 Infrastructure
      6. 4.6. Rejecting the "Quick and Now" Transition Choice
      7. 4.7. Selecting the Transition Mechanisms
        1. 4.7.1. Describing the Playing Field of Different Device Types
        2. 4.7.2. Understanding What Enables Your Transition Choices
        3. 4.7.3. Reviewing the Basics of DNS
        4. 4.7.4. Giving DNS a New Job
        5. 4.7.5. Talking Realistically About Upgrading Applications
        6. 4.7.6. Addressing Security Issues
        7. 4.7.7. Considering Advanced IPv6 Capabilities during Transitions
      8. 4.8. Deploying Native IPv6
      9. 4.9. Running Dual Stacks
        1. 4.9.1. Having the Best of Both Worlds
        2. 4.9.2. Mapping IPv4 Addresses to IPv6 Addresses
      10. 4.10. Going Through Tunnels
        1. 4.10.1. Adding a Layer to the Stack
        2. 4.10.2. Introducing Protocol #41
        3. 4.10.3. Understanding the Routing of Tunneled Packets
        4. 4.10.4. Terminating Tunnels at a Common Point
        5. 4.10.5. Understanding Tunneling to a Common Point
        6. 4.10.6. What about Tunneling IPv4 inside IPv6?
        7. 4.10.7. Factoring MTU Issues into Tunneling
        8. 4.10.8. Assessing the Security Requirements of Your Tunnels
      11. 4.11. Considering IPsec
        1. 4.11.1. Benefiting from Strong Authentication and Encryption
        2. 4.11.2. Combining Two Big Changes to Ease the Pains of Both
        3. 4.11.3. Being Comfortable the Workload Is Manageable
      12. 4.12. Realizing a Hybrid Approach Is the Best
      13. 4.13. Assembling the Jigsaw Puzzle
        1. 4.13.1. Checking Reality on Future Pure IPv6 Networks
        2. 4.13.2. Returning to the Example IPv6 Transition in Progress
        3. 4.13.3. Meeting the Mandates as the First Order of Business
        4. 4.13.4. Keeping the Old Stuff Running
        5. 4.13.5. Adding in the New Native Stuff
        6. 4.13.6. Wrapping It Up with Some Tunnels
      14. 4.14. Choosing Your Options
        1. 4.14.1. Checking Out Checklists
        2. 4.14.2. CHECKLIST: Custom Needs Assessment
      15. 4.15. Further Reading
      16. 4.16. Testing Your Knowledge
    2. 5. Creating Your Transition Plans
      1. 5.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 5.2. Approaching Your Planning Work
      3. 5.3. Planning to Plan
        1. 5.3.1. Determining Your Plan's Objectives
        2. 5.3.2. Covering All the Bases in Your Planning
        3. 5.3.3. Taking a Tip from Journalism
        4. 5.3.4. Who Will Work on the Project?
        5. 5.3.5. When Do You Need to Finish the Transition?
        6. 5.3.6. Working with the OMB-Mandated Deadlines
        7. 5.3.7. Getting and Using Appropriate Planning Tools
        8. 5.3.8. Understanding the Costs of Rolling Your Own Tools
        9. 5.3.9. Determining Where the Transition Will Happen
        10. 5.3.10. Obtaining Service-Level Minima and Best Practices
        11. 5.3.11. CHECKLIST: Planning Resources Inventory
      4. 5.4. Creating a Comprehensive Plan
        1. 5.4.1. Understanding the Project Triangle
        2. 5.4.2. Knowing When More Resources Won't Help
        3. 5.4.3. Documenting Your Assumptions
        4. 5.4.4. Defining Where Plans Come Together with Dependencies
        5. 5.4.5. Avoiding Scheduling Traps and Pitfalls
        6. 5.4.6. Planning Enough, but Not Too Much
      5. 5.5. Developing Plans within Plans
        1. 5.5.1. Laying Out Your IPv6 Building
        2. 5.5.2. Planning at Each Layer of the Network Stack
        3. 5.5.3. Scoping the Boundaries between Plans
        4. 5.5.4. Minimizing Overlaps in Plans
      6. 5.6. Tracking and Adjusting the Plan
        1. 5.6.1. Keeping the Original Plan in Sight
        2. 5.6.2. Limiting Changes to the Baseline
        3. 5.6.3. Keeping an Eye on the Time You're Spending
        4. 5.6.4. Tracking Slips without Picking Nits
        5. 5.6.5. Assessing How Much of a Slip Is Recoverable
      7. 5.7. Finding Resources to Help with the Transition
        1. 5.7.1. Seeking Guidance from OMB
        2. 5.7.2. Engaging Professional Help
      8. 5.8. Further Reading
      9. 5.9. Testing Your Knowledge
    3. 6. Defining the Transition Preparation Steps
      1. 6.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 6.2. Inventorying Your Assets and Capabilities
        1. 6.2.1. Defining Your Inventory Goals
        2. 6.2.2. Distinguishing Your Assets
        3. 6.2.3. Distributing Your Inventory Work
        4. 6.2.4. Inventorying Your Networks and Their Assets
        5. 6.2.5. Inventorying Your Software Assets
        6. 6.2.6. Documenting What Exists Now
        7. 6.2.7. Knowing Your Inventory Is Correct
        8. 6.2.8. Assessing Your Network's Capabilities
        9. 6.2.9. Verifying that Your Required Capabilities Work
        10. 6.2.10. CHECKLIST: Asset and Capabilities Inventories
      3. 6.3. Defining the Post-Transition Configuration
        1. 6.3.1. Determining How to Make an Asset IPv6 Capable
        2. 6.3.2. Determining What You Need to Replace or Upgrade
        3. 6.3.3. Maximizing What You Can Leave As Is or Swap
        4. 6.3.4. Consolidating Systems Into a More Capable One
        5. 6.3.5. Re-purposing Assets to Other Parts of Your Network
        6. 6.3.6. CHECKLIST: Asset Disposition
        7. 6.3.7. Confirming the New Configuration Satisfies Its Mission
        8. 6.3.8. Documenting the New Configuration
      4. 6.4. Communicating the Plan
        1. 6.4.1. Why You Should Tell People What You're Going to Do
        2. 6.4.2. Keeping Monitoring Organizations in the Loop
        3. 6.4.3. Posting Contact Numbers for All Key Transition Staff
      5. 6.5. Scheduling Transition Events
        1. 6.5.1. Using Off-peak and Maintenance Times for Transition
        2. 6.5.2. Working within a Predefined Maintenance Window
        3. 6.5.3. Staying within Your Allotted Maintenance Time
      6. 6.6. Staging Resources for a Speedier Transition
        1. 6.6.1. Preparing Replacements and Upgrades for Installation
        2. 6.6.2. Getting What's Needed Where It's Needed Ahead of Time
        3. 6.6.3. Checking That Everything's Ready Before You Start
      7. 6.7. Getting the Right Approvals
        1. 6.7.1. Complying with Existing Procedures and Practices
        2. 6.7.2. Making Sure You Have Approvals in Writing
      8. 6.8. Testing Your Knowledge
    4. 7. Identifying Common Transition Preparation Tasks
      1. 7.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 7.2. Provisioning Your IPv6 Address Space
        1. 7.2.1. Developing an IPv6 Address-space Mindset
        2. 7.2.2. Starting at the Top with RIRs
        3. 7.2.3. Getting IPv6 Addresses from ISPs
        4. 7.2.4. Using Addresses in 6to4 Space
        5. 7.2.5. What Should You Do Until the Policy Dust Settles?
      3. 7.3. Creating and Maintaining an IPv6 Numbering Plan
        1. 7.3.1. Bidding Farewell to IPv4 Network-Numbering Headaches
        2. 7.3.2. Enjoying Network-Architectural Freedom with IPv6
        3. 7.3.3. Numbering Your Networks
        4. 7.3.4. Creating Interface Identifiers
        5. 7.3.5. Managing Your Numbering Plan
      4. 7.4. Getting External IPv6 Connectivity
        1. 7.4.1. Finding Native Connectivity
        2. 7.4.2. Going with Tunneled Connectivity
        3. 7.4.3. Using 6to4 Relays
        4. 7.4.4. Connecting Externally at Many Points
      5. 7.5. Assessing Whether to Deploy IPsec with IPv6
        1. 7.5.1. Determining What Deploying IPsec Entails
        2. 7.5.2. Getting to Know the Basics of IPsec
      6. 7.6. Factoring in any Bandwidth Requirements
        1. 7.6.1. Determining the Effect of Increased Header Sizes
        2. 7.6.2. Estimating Other Packet Size Changes
        3. 7.6.3. What Additional Traffic Can You Expect?
      7. 7.7. Investigating More-Advanced IPv6 Capabilities
        1. 7.7.1. Adopting the New Secure Auto-Configuration Features
        2. 7.7.2. Introducing Mobile IPv6
      8. 7.8. Testing Your Knowledge
    5. 8. Defining the Transition Execution Steps
      1. 8.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 8.2. Organizing the Transition Execution Activities
        1. 8.2.1. Picking What to Switch Out and in What Order
        2. 8.2.2. Identifying and Resolving Execution Dependencies
        3. 8.2.3. Balancing Efficiency with Resilience
        4. 8.2.4. Grouping Your Transition Activities
        5. 8.2.5. Identifying Any Irreversible Steps
        6. 8.2.6. Verifying Capabilities to Create Checkpoints
        7. 8.2.7. Using Optional Work Items to Fill Spare Time
      3. 8.3. Adopting the Expect-To-Revert Mindset
        1. 8.3.1. Defining a Normal State for Your Network
        2. 8.3.2. Knowing When to Revert
        3. 8.3.3. Getting Back to a Normal State
        4. 8.3.4. Regrouping and Trying Again
      4. 8.4. Creating a Sample Transition Activity Schedule
        1. 8.4.1. Plugging Known Values into the Activities Schedule
        2. 8.4.2. Computing Your Activities' Revert Times
        3. 8.4.3. Keeping Your Transition Schedules Manageable
      5. 8.5. Making Sure Everything and Everyone Is Ready
        1. 8.5.1. Backing Up Data and Configurations Before Starting
        2. 8.5.2. Communicating the Details of Your Transition Activities
        3. 8.5.3. Getting the Green Light for Your Transition Activities
      6. 8.6. Testing Your Knowledge
    6. 9. Defining the Transition Verification Steps
      1. 9.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 9.2. Testing the New Configuration
        1. 9.2.1. Benefiting from Good Requirements
        2. 9.2.2. Reviewing IPv6 Transition Terminology
        3. 9.2.3. Including Verification in Your Transition Activities
        4. 9.2.4. Separating Execution and Verification
        5. 9.2.5. Verifying the Different Types of Capabilities
        6. 9.2.6. Using Black-Box, White-Box, and Grey-Box Testing
        7. 9.2.7. Verifying the Minimum Required Capabilities
        8. 9.2.8. Verifying the Less-Required and Optional Capabilities
        9. 9.2.9. Using Regression Tests to Expedite Verification
        10. 9.2.10. Automating Your Verification Tests
      3. 9.3. Recovering from Failure
        1. 9.3.1. Determining the Cause of a Verification Failure
        2. 9.3.2. Fixing Non-Critical Failures without Reverting
        3. 9.3.3. Reverting from Backups
      4. 9.4. Knowing When You Are Done
        1. 9.4.1. Making Sure to Clean Up Any Loose Ends
        2. 9.4.2. Communicating When Activities Are Complete
      5. 9.5. Testing Your Knowledge
    7. 10. Factoring IPv6-Specific Risks and Limitations into Your Plans
      1. 10.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 10.2. What Risks Are There with Your IPv6 Transition?
      3. 10.3. Acknowledging That You Are a Pioneer
        1. 10.3.1. Dealing with the Lack of IPv6 Lessons Learned Online
        2. 10.3.2. Seeking Out Those Who Went Before You
        3. 10.3.3. Publishing Your Experiences and Questions
        4. 10.3.4. Creating an Enterprise Transition Knowledge Base
      4. 10.4. Realizing That with Changes Come Bugs
      5. 10.5. Summarizing Risks from Prior Chapters
        1. 10.5.1. Re-Visiting Auto-Configuration
        2. 10.5.2. Tunneling with Care
        3. 10.5.3. Avoiding EUI-64 or Knowing Its Limits
        4. 10.5.4. Looking for IPv6 ISPs
        5. 10.5.5. Coping with ISP-Centric Addressing
      6. 10.6. Recalling All the Things That IPv6 Didn't Change
      7. 10.7. Analyzing Other Risks of IPv6 Features
        1. 10.7.1. Understanding IPv6's Version of ICMP
        2. 10.7.2. Reviewing the Limited Success of IPv4 Options
        3. 10.7.3. Finding Risks in IPv6 Extension Headers
        4. 10.7.4. What Should I Do with My Firewall Configurations?
      8. 10.8. Understanding Mobile IPv6's Risks and Limitations
        1. 10.8.1. Defining the Roles of Devices in Mobile IPv6
        2. 10.8.2. Establishing the Goals of Mobile IPv6
        3. 10.8.3. Extensions, Options, and ICMPv6 Messages, Oh My!
        4. 10.8.4. What Other IPv6 Features Does Mobile IPv6 Require?
        5. 10.8.5. Losing Traffic While Mobile Nodes Are Moving
        6. 10.8.6. Regarding Accessibility of Home Agents
        7. 10.8.7. Cracking the Books to Learn More
      9. 10.9. Further Reading
      10. 10.10. Testing Your Knowledge
  9. III. Easing Your Transition
    1. 11. Knowing What Assets You Have
      1. 11.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 11.2. Combining Inventory with Discovery
      3. 11.3. Summarizing Chapter 6, "Defining the Transition Preparation Steps"
        1. 11.3.1. Remembering the Goals of Your Inventory Work
        2. 11.3.2. Having an Inventory Strategy
        3. 11.3.3. Getting Sufficient Network Coverage
        4. 11.3.4. Saving Your Results
        5. 11.3.5. Keeping Your Inventory Current
      4. 11.4. Deploying a Discovery Solution
        1. 11.4.1. Benefiting from Automated Discovery Tools
        2. 11.4.2. Listing the Asset Types Your Tools Need to Find
        3. 11.4.3. Defining the Types of Automated Discovery Tools
        4. 11.4.4. Creating a Known Baseline from Which to Inventory
        5. 11.4.5. Knowing from Where to Look
        6. 11.4.6. Setting the Bounds of What You Are Inventorying
        7. 11.4.7. Being Careful in Your Discovery Activities
        8. 11.4.8. Integrating Your Distributed Results
        9. 11.4.9. Discovering IPv6 Assets from the IPv4 Side
        10. 11.4.10. Finding the Right Tools for Your Inventory Work
        11. 11.4.11. Assessing Emerging IPv6 Discovery Tools
      5. 11.5. What Discovery Tools Are Out There?
        1. 11.5.1. Lumeta's IPsonar
        2. 11.5.2. Nmap
        3. 11.5.3. SolarWinds' LANsurveyor
        4. 11.5.4. Xprobe
        5. 11.5.5. Other Tools
      6. 11.6. Managing Your Discovered Assets
        1. 11.6.1. Distinguishing Asset Management Tool Types
        2. 11.6.2. Feeding Discovery Results to Management Tools
        3. 11.6.3. Extracting Asset Data from Support Systems
      7. 11.7. What Asset Management Tools Are Out There?
        1. 11.7.1. BlueCat Networks' Proteus
        2. 11.7.2. BT INS' IPControl
        3. 11.7.3. Internet Associates' IPal
        4. 11.7.4. The Big Boys
      8. 11.8. Growing Your Own Tools
      9. 11.9. Testing Your Knowledge
    2. 12. Selecting an Enterprise Transition Strategy
      1. 12.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 12.2. Choosing Between the Chicken and the Egg
        1. 12.2.1. Defining the Sides of the Deployment Stalemate
        2. 12.2.2. Understanding What's Behind MIS/IT's Lack of Urgency
        3. 12.2.3. Seeing the Problem from the Edges' Point of View
        4. 12.2.4. Getting the IPv6 Transition Rolling
      3. 12.3. Revisiting the Backbone-First Transition
        1. 12.3.1. Understanding the U.S. Government's Position
        2. 12.3.2. Starting Your Transition with the Network Backbone
        3. 12.3.3. Appreciating the Motivator That Is Ubiquitous IPv6
        4. 12.3.4. What's Next, After the Backbone Transition?
      4. 12.4. Examining the Edges-First Transition Strategy
        1. 12.4.1. When Else Is the Edges-First Strategy a Better One?
        2. 12.4.2. Enabling Adoption without Ubiquitous IPv6
        3. 12.4.3. Renumbering Devices When the Backbone Is Ready
      5. 12.5. Combining the Two Transition Strategies
      6. 12.6. Testing Your Knowledge
    3. 13. Using Pilot Programs to Facilitate Your IPv6 Transition
      1. 13.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 13.2. Creating a Successful IPv6 Pilot
        1. 13.2.1. Identifying a Project or Need
        2. 13.2.2. Defining Your Pilot's Goals Before Starting
        3. 13.2.3. Differentiating Ad Hoc Versus Official Pilots
      3. 13.3. Scoping the Pilot
        1. 13.3.1. Identifying Assets for the Pilot
        2. 13.3.2. Mitigating Scope Creep
      4. 13.4. Monitoring the Pilot
        1. 13.4.1. Measuring the Right Things
        2. 13.4.2. Changing the Pilot Mid-Stream
      5. 13.5. Assessing the Impact of Potential Failure
        1. 13.5.1. Making Everyone Accept That the Pilot Could Fail
        2. 13.5.2. Planning for the Failure Case
      6. 13.6. Drilling Down on Software Pilots
        1. 13.6.1. Describing IP Addresses in Software Applications
        2. 13.6.2. What Else Must Change in the Application?
        3. 13.6.3. Finding Information on Porting Applications to IPv6
      7. 13.7. Looking at a Real-Life Pilot and Its Results
        1. 13.7.1. Assessing the Pilot's Applicability to the Organization
        2. 13.7.2. Setting the Pilot's Goals
        3. 13.7.3. Simplifying Development to Reduce Complexity
        4. 13.7.4. How Did the Pilot Turn Out?
      8. 13.8. Testing Your Knowledge
  10. IV. Managing After Transition
    1. 14. Understanding That Your Network Isn't New
      1. 14.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 14.2. Welcoming IPv6 into Network Operations
      3. 14.3. Teaching Your New Network Some Old Tricks
      4. 14.4. Incorporating Multicast into Network Maintenance
      5. 14.5. Addressing Some of the Old Security Risks
        1. 14.5.1. Handling the Application Flaws That Are Still Present
        2. 14.5.2. Hiding Potentially Flawed Devices in the Address Space
      6. 14.6. Assessing IPv6's Denial of Service Risks
        1. 14.6.1. Using IPsec to Curb Certain Denial of Service Attacks
        2. 14.6.2. Adopting Flow Labels as they Become Better Defined
      7. 14.7. Growing Your Network with IPv6 in Mind
        1. 14.7.1. Learning What Performance Means with IPv6
        2. 14.7.2. Deploying New Capabilities
      8. 14.8. Testing Your Knowledge
    2. 15. Managing IPv4 and IPv6 on the Same Network
      1. 15.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 15.2. Mixing Protocol Families on Networks
      3. 15.3. Managing Your IPv4 and IPv6 Communities as One
        1. 15.3.1. Describing Dual-Stack Systems Using Superposition
        2. 15.3.2. Keeping Track of All Those Different Addresses
        3. 15.3.3. Providing ISP Connectivity to Both Communities
      4. 15.4. Separating IPv4 and IPv6 Communities as Needed
        1. 15.4.1. Defining and Enforcing Community Perimeters
        2. 15.4.2. Using Network Topology to Define Security Policy
        3. 15.4.3. Remembering the Importance of Path MTU
        4. 15.4.4. Making a Case for Proxied Path MTU Discovery
      5. 15.5. Factoring Protocols into Application Acquisition
      6. 15.6. Testing Your Knowledge
    3. 16. Maintaining Eternal Vigilance
      1. 16.1. What You'll Learn
      2. 16.2. Logging What You Can't Control
        1. 16.2.1. Keeping Watch on IPv6 Just Like You Did with IPv4
        2. 16.2.2. Reviewing Advanced Logging and Analysis Products
        3. 16.2.3. Adapting Advanced Logging Tools to IPv6
        4. 16.2.4. Surveying the IPv6-Capable Advanced Logging Tools
        5. 16.2.5. Choosing How to Protect Systems You Can't Watch
      3. 16.3. Reviewing Configurations Periodically
        1. 16.3.1. Using Transition-Planning Processes for Daily Tasks
        2. 16.3.2. Keeping Current on IPv6 Security Problems and Fixes
  11. A. Answers to the Testing Your Knowledge Questions
    1. A.1. Chapter 1: What Is IPv6?
    2. A.2. Chapter 2: Demystifying IPv6
    3. A.3. Chapter 3: The Current IPv6 Landscape
    4. A.4. Chapter 4: Choosing When to Make the Transition and How
    5. A.5. Chapter 5: Creating Your Transition Plans
    6. A.6. Chapter 6: Defining the Transition Preparation Steps
    7. A.7. Chapter 7: Identifying Common Transition Preparation Tasks
    8. A.8. Chapter 8: Defining the Transition Execution Steps
    9. A.9. Chapter 9: Defining the Transition Verification Steps
    10. A.10. Chapter 10: Factoring IPv6-specific Risks and Limitations into Your Plans
    11. A.11. Chapter 11: Knowing What Assets You Have
    12. A.12. Chapter 12: Selecting an Enterprise Transition Strategy
    13. A.13. Chapter 13: Using Pilot Programs to Facilitate Your IPv6 Transition
    14. A.14. Chapter 14: Understanding That Your Network Isn't New
    15. A.15. Chapter 15: Managing IPv4 and IPv6 on the Same Network
    16. A.16. Chapter 16: Maintaining Eternal Vigilance