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iPad for Digital Photographers by Derrick Story

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Chapter 3

Editing Your Photos

I know, I know: You’ve been dying to get to this chapter. I realize that earlier information about organizing your photos isn’t as sexy as making them pop off the screen with image adjustments.

But organization is an important step before image editing. Why? Because you should only spend time image-editing your best photographs. I’m going to say that one more time, because it’s super-important: Image-edit only your best work. Don’t dilute your creativity and waste your time by messing with subpar photographs. Instead, use organizational markers such as iPhoto for iOS’s Flags and Favorites to identify your best work. Then apply your brilliance to the marked pictures.

But now that you know how to organize your photos on the iPad, we can get to the fun stuff. Consider Chapter 2 the “eating your vegetables first” part of the book. That is, unless you’re a vegetarian. Hmmm. Well, anyway, let’s get on with it.

Image editing has always been an important part of photography. Artists such as Ansel Adams and W. Eugene Smith were as proficient in the darkroom as they were behind the camera. Today, digital photography makes fine-tuning our pictures even easier. And no place is that more evident than on an iPad.

Once an image appears on the device, you can literally interact with it using your fingertips. (I’ll resist any childhood finger painting analogies, but ...

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