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Invisible Gold in Asia

Book Description

World competition in the 21st century will revolve around competition for intellectual property rights (IPRs). But what are these rights that you can't see – the Invisible Gold of today's Knowledge Economy. What can you do with them and how can Asian businesses foster the innovation and creativity they protect? From the patents protecting Creative Technology's MP3 player and Tata's ‘Nano' car to ‘Tsingtao' and ‘Singha' branded beer, IPRs protect this Invisible Gold. David Llewelyn challenges Asian businesses to build up their reserves of Invisible Gold and governments to build a culture that encourages and rewards innovation and creativity. Using Asian examples throughout, David Llewelyn explains what the rights are, answers the questions and sheds much-needed light on this crucial but little-understood part of doing business in the 21st century.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title
  3. Copyright
  4. Acknowledgements
  5. Contents
  6. Introduction
    1. It’s cold out there
    2. What’s coming?
  7. Part One: What Are Intellectual Property Rights?
    1. 01 Invisible Gold: what it is (and what it is not)
      1. THE PATENT
      2. What’s relatedi. Trade secret
      3. THE TRADEMARK
      4. What’s relatedi. Unfair competition
      5. Back to trademarks
      6. What’s related
      7. THE COPYRIGHT
      8. Copyright and copy-wrong
      9. The digital dilemma
      10. EVEN MORE RIGHTS
      11. Registered designs
      12. Semiconductor chip rights
      13. Plant or seed rights
    2. 02 Ten dangerous misconceptions
      1. 1. IP equals patents
      2. 2. Having IPRs in your home market is enough
      3. 3. IPRs protect, or restrict the flow of ideas
      4. 4. It’s just a matter of copying what they do in the USA
      5. 5. Getting the IPRs is the hard part
      6. 6. Getting IPRs can wait until you can afford it
      7. 7. IPRs are expensive,and only large businesses can afford them
      8. 8. IP infringement is theft
      9. 9. All IPRs are basically the same
      10. 10. You have a right to use your IPRs,and what’s registered is valid
    3. 03 A patchwork quilt of Invisible Gold
      1. THE LONG AND LONGER
      2. MUCH ADO ABOUT INNOVATION
      3. STEPPING STONES
      4. AN INVITATION TO COURT
      5. CHANGING A LIABILITY INTO AN ASSET
      6. IT’S A CHANGING WORLD
      7. EVOLUTION
      8. SEEING MAY NOT BE BELIEVING
      9. A WHITEWASH
    4. 04 It all depends on your perspective
      1. THE IPR OWNER
      2. THE CREATOR OR INNOVATOR
      3. THE EMPLOYEE
      4. THE PROSPECTIVE DEFENDANT(S)IN A LEGAL ACTION FOR IP INFRINGEMENT
      5. THE TEACHER
      6. THE GOVERNMENT
      7. THE TAX-PAYER
      8. THE MAN AND WOMAN IN THE STREET
      9. THE INTERNATIONAL POLICY MAKER
    5. 05 What’s the fuss about?
      1. WORLD-CLASS COMPETITION
      2. GLOBAL IMBALANCE
      3. THE TRIPS AGREEMENT
      4. IPR IMPERIALISM?
      5. OR UNJUSTIFIED CRITICISM?
      6. INTELLECTUAL PIRATES?
      7. TO ATTACK IS THE BEST DEFENCE
      8. NOT SEEING IS BELIEVING
      9. ALL-PERVASIVE
      10. FOLLOW UP IS NECESSARY
      11. A NUMBERS GAME
      12. DON’T THROW THE BABY OUTWITH THE BATH WATER
    6. 06 Why now in Asia?
      1. INTRA-ASIAN TRADE
      2. THE REGIONAL GIANTS
      3. IGNORANCE ISN’T BLISS
      4. HEADY INFLUENCE
      5. A WORLDWIDE EPIDEMIC
      6. UP, UP AND AWAY
      7. SPROUTING TECHNOLOGY
      8. R&D DOLLARS AND SENSE
      9. REALISM REQUIRED
      10. THE BALANCE REDRESSED?
      11. THE TYRANNY OF THE KPI
  8. Part Two: The Asian IP Landscape
    1. 07 It takes all sorts
      1. LEADING EDGE
      2. ELECTRIC EXPANSION
      3. CHINDIA
      4. ASEAN
      5. FREE TRADE
    2. 08 Japan
      1. RE-ENGAGING
      2. MITI AND INDUSTRIAL POLICY
      3. MATSUSHITA IN THE FIRING LINE
      4. SAVVY MANAGEMENT
      5. EXPORT OR DIE
      6. PICTURE PERFECT
      7. DOMINATION AND SLOWDOWN
      8. REPOSITIONING
    3. 09 The Little Dragons (or Asian Tigers)
      1. TAIWAN
      2. Acer
      3. ASUSTeK
      4. Hon Hai
      5. HTC
      6. HONG KONG
      7. VTech
      8. Playmates Toys
      9. Li Ka-Shing
      10. Embry Form
      11. REPUBLIC OF KOREA
      12. Samsung
      13. SINGAPORE
      14. A*STAR
      15. National Research Foundation
      16. SPRING Singapore
      17. IE Singapore, Infocomm Development Authority
      18. Grenidea Technologies
      19. The world’s my oyster
      20. External validation
    4. 10 China
      1. TOP CHINESE BRANDS IN 2005/2006
      2. TVs and household appliances
      3. Alcohol and cigarettes
      4. Motor vehicles
      5. BRANDING A GOOD IDEA
      6. Sportswear
      7. Household appliances
      8. Dairy products
      9. Health care
      10. Telecoms
      11. THE NEXT STAGE
      12. FUTURE UNCERTAINTIES
    5. 11 India
      1. BIG BELLIES
      2. PATENTLY CLEAR
      3. Motor vehicles
      4. Pharmaceuticals
      5. Biotech
      6. Medical devices
      7. PUBLIC-PRIVATE INITIATIVE
      8. START-STOP SYNDROME
    6. 12 Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand
      1. MALAYSIA
      2. Sri Kulai
      3. Pensonic
      4. Selangor Pewter
      5. Top Glove
      6. Sime Darby
      7. INDONESIA
      8. Indofoods
      9. THE PHILIPPINES
      10. The only way is up
      11. Bio-pirates ahoy!
      12. Jollibee
      13. Nature’s Legacy Eximport
      14. Splash Corporation
      15. San Miguel
      16. Chikka Asia
      17. Pancake House Inc
      18. Edgardo Vasquez
      19. THAILAND
      20. Thai patents
      21. Recent initiatives
      22. Royal inventions
      23. Rice production
      24. Agarwood harvests
      25. Charoen Pokphand Group
      26. Stars Microelectronics
      27. Narai Intertrade
      28. Thai Union Frozen Foods
      29. Osotspa International
      30. Univanich Palm Oil
      31. Siam Safety Premier
      32. Kang Yong Electric
      33. Heritage issues
      34. A NOTE ON BRUNEI
    7. 13 Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Vietnam
      1. SRI LANKA
      2. Tea production
      3. Rileys
      4. PAKISTAN
      5. VIETNAM
    8. 14 Bangladesh, Laos and Cambodia
      1. BANGLADESH
      2. LAOS
      3. CAMBODIA
      4. A NOTE ON MYANMAR
    9. 15 Buying and selling IPRs
      1. TO TAKE OVER A COMPETITOR
      2. Creative Technology
      3. AAPICO Hitech
      4. United Phosphorus
      5. Punj Lloyd
      6. TO SPECIALISE IN WHAT YOU ARE GOOD AT
      7. NTT DoCoMo
      8. Daiichi Sankyo
      9. TO TAKE A LEAP UP THE TECHNOLOGY CURVE
      10. Lenovo
      11. Tata Group
      12. TO BUY A BIT OF HISTORY
      13. Renown
      14. VIP Industries
      15. Others
    10. 16 You can’t do it all yourself: licensing of IPRs
      1. LOVE TO LICENCE
      2. PLAIN SAILING
      3. CHOOSE WISELY
      4. BULL’S EYE!
      5. REJECTING THE ‘NOT INVENTED HERE’ SYNDROME
      6. COMBINING RESOURCES
      7. RIDE THE WIND
      8. GOOD THINGS CAN COME TO AN END …
      9. … OR PERHAPS NOT
    11. 17 The dark side: counterfeiting and piracy
      1. LIFE AND DEATH
      2. COUNTERFEIT? THINK AGAIN
      3. POTENTIALLY LETHAL
      4. PRETEND LUXURY
      5. A TOUCH OF HYPOCRISY
      6. SOFT TARGETS
      7. THAT’S INCREDIBLE!
      8. WHOLE LOT OF HYPE
    12. 18 What next in Asia?
      1. COLLABORATE OR PERISH
  9. Glossary
  10. Appendix 1: Asia’s largest companies with IP exposure
  11. Appendix 2: Asian brands in the Brand Finance Global 500 List
  12. Appendix 3: Timeline of significant events in Asia’s Invisible Gold story
  13. Sources
  14. Index
  15. About The Author