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Introduction to Nanomaterials and Devices

Book Description

An invaluable introduction to nanomaterials and their applications

Offering the unique approach of applying traditional physics concepts to explain new phenomena, Introduction to Nanomaterials and Devices provides readers with a solid foundation on the subject of quantum mechanics and introduces the basic concepts of nanomaterials and the devices fabricated from them. Discussion begins with the basis for understanding the basic properties of semiconductors and gradually evolves to cover quantum structures—including single, multiple, and quantum wells—and the properties of nanomaterial systems, such as quantum wires and dots.

Written by a renowned specialist in the field, this book features:

  • An introduction to the growth of bulk semiconductors, semiconductor thin films, and semiconductor nanomaterials

  • Information on the application of quantum mechanics to nanomaterial structures and quantum transport

  • Extensive coverage of Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein stastistics

  • An in-depth look at optical, electrical, and transport properties

  • Coverage of electronic devices and optoelectronic devices

  • Calculations of the energy levels in periodic potentials, quantum wells, and quantum dots

Introduction to Nanomaterials and Devices provides essential groundwork for understanding the behavior and growth of nanomaterials and is a valuable resource for students and practitioners in a field full of possibilities for innovation and invention.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Dedication Page
  5. Preface
  6. Fundamental Constants
  7. Chapter 1: Growth of Bulk, Thin Films, and Nanomaterials
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Growth of Bulk Semiconductors
    3. 1.3 Growth of Semiconductor Thin Films
    4. 1.4 Fabrication and Growth of Semiconductor Nanomaterials
    5. 1.5 Colloidal Growth of Nanocrystals
    6. Bibliography
  8. Chapter 2: Application of Quantum Mechanics to Nanomaterial Structures
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 The de Broglie Relation
    3. 2.3 Wave Functions and Schrödinger Equation
    4. 2.4 Dirac Notation
    5. 2.5 Variational Method
    6. 2.6 Stationary States of a Particle in a Potential Step
    7. 2.7 Potential Barrier with a Finite Height
    8. 2.8 Potential Well with an Infinite Depth
    9. 2.9 Finite Depth Potential Well
    10. 2.10 Unbound Motion of a Particle (E > V0) in a Potential Well With a Finite Depth
    11. 2.11 Triangular Potential Well
    12. 2.12 Delta Function Potentials
    13. 2.13 Transmission in Finite Double Barrier Potential Wells
    14. 2.14 Envelope Function Approximation
    15. 2.15 Periodic Potential
    16. 2.16 Effective Mass
    17. Bibliography
  9. Chapter 3: Density of States in Semiconductor Materials
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Distribution Functions
    3. 3.3 Maxwell–Boltzmann Statistic
    4. 3.4 Fermi–Dirac Statistics
    5. 3.5 Bose–Einstein Statistics
    6. 3.6 Density of States
    7. 3.7 Density of States of Quantum Wells, Wires, and Dots
    8. 3.8 Density of States of Other Systems
    9. Bibliography
  10. Chapter 4: Optical Properties
    1. 4.1 Fundamentals
    2. 4.2 Lorentz and Drude Models
    3. 4.3 The Optical Absorption Coefficient of the Interband Transition in Direct Band Gap Semiconductors
    4. 4.4 The Optical Absorption Coefficient of the Interband Transition in Indirect Band Gap Semiconductors
    5. 4.5 The Optical Absorption Coefficient of the Interband Transition in Quantum Wells
    6. 4.6 The Optical Absorption Coefficient of the Interband Transition in Type II Superlattices
    7. 4.7 The Optical Absorption Coefficient of the Intersubband Transition in Multiple Quantum Wells
    8. 4.8 The Optical Absorption Coefficient of the Intersubband Transition in GaN/AlGaN Multiple Quantum Wells
    9. 4.9 Electronic Transitions in Multiple Quantum Dots
    10. 4.10 Selection Rules
    11. 4.11 Excitons
    12. 4.12 Cyclotron Resonance
    13. 4.13 Photoluminescence
    14. 4.14 Basic Concepts of Photoconductivity
    15. Bibliography
  11. Chapter 5: Electrical and Transport Properties
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 The Hall Effect
    3. 5.3 Quantum Hall and Shubnikov- Haas Effects
    4. 5.4 Charge Carrier Transport in Bulk Semiconductors
    5. 5.5 Boltzmann Transport Equation
    6. 5.6 Derivation of Transport Coefficients Using the Boltzmann Transport Equation
    7. 5.7 Scattering Mechanisms in Bulk Semiconductors
    8. 5.8 Scattering in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas
    9. 5.9 Coherence and Mesoscopic Systems
    10. Bibliography
  12. Chapter 6: Electronic Devices
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Schottky Diode
    3. 6.3 Metal–Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MESFETs)
    4. 6.4 Junction Field-Effect Transistor (JFET)
    5. 6.5 Heterojunction Field-Effect Transistors (HFETs)
    6. 6.6 GaN/AlGaN Heterojunction Field-Effect Transistors (HFETs)
    7. 6.7 Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs)
    8. 6.8 Tunneling Electron Transistors
    9. 6.9 The – Junction Tunneling Diode
    10. 6.10 Resonant Tunneling Diodes
    11. 6.11 Coulomb Blockade
    12. 6.12 Single-Electron Transistor
    13. Bibliography
  13. Chapter 7: Optoelectronic Devices
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Infrared Quantum Detectors
    3. 7.3 Light-Emitting Diodes
    4. 7.4 Semiconductor Lasers
    5. Bibliography
  14. Appendix A: Derivation of Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle
  15. Appendix B: Perturbation
    1. Bibliography
  16. Appendix C: Angular Momentum
  17. Appendix D: Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) Approximation
    1. Bibliography
  18. Appendix E: Parabolic Potential Well
    1. Bibliography
  19. Appendix F: Transmission Coefficient in Superlattices
  20. Appendix G: Lattice Vibrations and Phonons
  21. Appendix H: Tunneling Through Potential Barriers
    1. Bibliography
  22. Index