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Introduction to Nanoelectronics

Book Description

This book was first published in 2007. Increasing miniaturization of devices, components, and integrated systems requires developments in the capacity to measure, organize, and manipulate matter at the nanoscale. This textbook is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary account of the technology and science that underpin nanoelectronics, covering the underlying physics, nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanodevices. Without assuming prior knowledge of quantum physics, this book provides a unifying framework for the basic ideas needed to understand the recent developments in the field. Numerous illustrations, homework problems and interactive Java applets help the student to appreciate the basic principles of nanotechnology, and to apply them to real problems. Written in a clear yet rigorous and interdisciplinary manner, this textbook is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in electrical and electronic engineering, nanoscience, materials, bioengineering, and chemical engineering.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright
  5. Contents
  6. Preface
  7. List of notation
  8. 1. Toward the nanoscale
  9. 2. Particles and waves
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Classical particles
    3. 2.3 Classical waves
    4. 2.4 Wave–particle duality
    5. 2.5 Closing remarks
    6. 2.6 Problems
  10. 3. Wave mechanics
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 The Schrödinger wave equation
    3. 3.3 Wave mechanics of particles: selected examples
    4. 3.4 Atoms and atomic orbitals
    5. 3.5 Closing remarks
    6. 3.6 Problems
  11. 4. Materials for nanoelectronics
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Semiconductors
    3. 4.3 Crystal lattices: bonding in crystals
    4. 4.4 Electron energy bands
    5. 4.5 Semiconductor heterostructures
    6. 4.6 Lattice-matched and pseudomorphic heterostructures
    7. 4.7 Organic semiconductors
    8. 4.8 Carbon nanomaterials: nanotubes and fullerenes
    9. 4.9 Closing remarks
    10. 4.10 Problems
  12. 5. Growth, fabrication, and measurement techniques for nanostructures
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Bulk crystal and heterostructure growth
    3. 5.3 Nanolithography, etching, and other means for fabrication of nanostructures and nanodevices
    4. 5.4 Techniques for characterization of nanostructures
    5. 5.5 Spontaneous formation and ordering of nanostructures
    6. 5.6 Clusters and nanocrystals
    7. 5.7 Methods of nanotube growth
    8. 5.8 Chemical and biological methods for nanoscale fabrication
    9. 5.9 Fabrication of nanoelectromechanical systems
    10. 5.10 Closing remarks
    11. 5.11 Problems
  13. 6. Electron transport in semiconductors and nanostructures
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Time and length scales of the electrons in solids
    3. 6.3 Statistics of the electrons in solids and nanostructures
    4. 6.4 The density of states of electrons in nanostructures
    5. 6.5 Electron transport in nanostructures
    6. 6.6 Closing remarks
    7. 6.7 Problems
  14. 7. Electrons in traditional low-dimensional structures
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Electrons in quantum wells
    3. 7.3 Electrons in quantum wires
    4. 7.4 Electrons in quantum dots
    5. 7.5 Closing remarks
    6. 7.6 Problems
  15. 8. Nanostructure devices
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Resonant-tunneling diodes
    3. 8.3 Field-effect transistors
    4. 8.4 Single-electron-transfer devices
    5. 8.5 Potential-effect transistors
    6. 8.6 Light-emitting diodes and lasers
    7. 8.7 Nanoelectromechanical system devices
    8. 8.8 Quantum-dot cellular automata
    9. 8.9 Closing remarks
  16. Appendix: tables of units
  17. Index