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Introduction to Electric Circuits, 9th Edition by Richard C. Dorf, James A. Svoboda

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CHAPTER 17 images

Two-Port and Three-Port Networks

IN THIS CHAPTER

17.1 Introduction

17.2 T-to-Π Transformation and Two-Port Three-Terminal Networks

17.3 Equations of Two-Port Networks

17.4 Z and Y Parameters for a Circuit with Dependent Sources

17.5 Hybrid and Transmission Parameters

17.6 Relationships Between Two-Port Parameters

17.7 Interconnection of Two-Port Networks

17.8 How Can We Check … ?

17.9 DESIGN EXAMPLE—Transistor Amplifier

17.10 Summary

Problems

Design Problems

17.1 Introduction

Many practical circuits have just two ports of access, that is, two places where signals may be input or output. For example, a coaxial cable between Boston and San Francisco has two ports, one at each of those cities. The object here is to analyze such networks in terms of their terminal characteristics without particular regard to the internal composition of the network. To this end, the network will be described by relationships between the port voltages and currents.

We study two-port networks and the parameters that describe them for a number of reasons. Most circuits or systems have at least two ports. We may put an input signal into one port and obtain an output signal from the other. The parameters of the two-port network completely describe its behavior in terms of the voltage and current at each port. Thus, knowing the parameters of a two-port network permits us to describe its operation ...

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