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Introduction to Digital Audio, 2nd Edition

Book Description

Master the basics from first principles: the physics of sound, principles of hearing etc, then progress onward to fundamental digital principles, conversion, compression and coding and then onto transmission, digital audio workstations, DAT and optical disks. Get up to speed with how digital audio is used within DVD, Digital Audio Broadcasting, networked audio and MPEG transport streams.


All of the key technologies are here: compression, DAT, DAB, DVD, SACD, oversampling, noise shaping and error correction theories are treated in a simple yet accurate form.

Thoroughly researched, totally up-to-date and technically accurate this is the only book you need on the subject.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Halftitle
  3. Title
  4. Copyright
  5. Contents
  6. Preface to the second edition
  7. 1. Introducing digital audio
    1. 1.1 Audio as data
    2. 1.2 What is an audio signal?
    3. 1.3 Why binary?
    4. 1.4 Why digital?
    5. 1.5 Some digital audio processes outlined
    6. 1.6 Time compression and expansion
    7. 1.7 Error correction and concealment
    8. 1.8 Channel coding
    9. 1.9 Audio compression
    10. 1.10 Disk-based recording
    11. 1.11 Rotary-head digital recorders
    12. 1.12 Digital audio broadcasting
    13. 1.13 Networks
  8. 2. Some audio principles
    1. 2.1 The physics of sound
    2. 2.2 Wavelength
    3. 2.3 Periodic and aperiodic signals
    4. 2.4 Sound and the ear
    5. 2.5 The cochlea
    6. 2.6 Mental processes
    7. 2.7 Level and loudness
    8. 2.8 Frequency discrimination
    9. 2.9 Frequency response and linearity
    10. 2.10 The sine wave
    11. 2.11 Root mean square measurements
    12. 2.12 The deciBel
    13. 2.13 Audio level metering
  9. 3. Digital principles
    1. 3.1 Binary codes
    2. 3.2 Introduction to digital logic
    3. 3.3 The computer
    4. 3.4 Timebase correction
    5. 3.5 Multiplexing
    6. 3.6 Gain control
    7. 3.7 Digital faders and controls
    8. 3.8 A digital mixer
    9. 3.9 Filters
    10. 3.10 FIR filters
    11. 3.11 Sampling-rate conversion
    12. 3.12 Transforms and duality
    13. 3.13 The Fourier transform
    14. 3.14 The discrete cosine transform (DCT)
    15. 3.15 Modulo-n arithmetic
    16. 3.16 The Galois field
    17. 3.17 The phase-locked loop
  10. 4. Conversion
    1. 4.1 Introduction to conversion
    2. 4.2 Sampling and aliasing
    3. 4.3 Reconstruction
    4. 4.4 Filter design
    5. 4.5 Choice of sampling rate
    6. 4.6 Sample and hold
    7. 4.7 Sampling clock jitter
    8. 4.8 Aperture effect
    9. 4.9 Quantizing
    10. 4.10 Quantizing error
    11. 4.11 Basic digital-to-analog conversion
    12. 4.12 Basic analog-to-digital conversion
    13. 4.13 Alternative convertors
    14. 4.14 Oversampling
    15. 4.15 Oversampling without noise shaping
    16. 4.16 Noise shaping
    17. 4.17 Noise-shaping ADCs
    18. 4.18 A one-bit DAC
    19. 4.19 One-bit noise-shaping ADCs
  11. 5. Compression
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Lossless and perceptive coding
    3. 5.3 Compression principles
    4. 5.4 Codec level calibration
    5. 5.5 Quality measurement
    6. 5.6 The limits
    7. 5.7 Some guidelines
    8. 5.8 Audio compression tools
    9. 5.9 Sub-band coding
    10. 5.10 Transform coding
    11. 5.11 Compression formats
    12. 5.12 MPEG Layer I
    13. 5.13 MPEG Layer II
    14. 5.14 MPEG Layer III
    15. 5.15 MPEG-2 AAC
  12. 6. Digital coding principles
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Types of transmission channel
    3. 6.3 Transmission lines
    4. 6.4 Types of recording medium
    5. 6.5 Magnetic recording
    6. 6.6 Azimuth recording and rotary heads
    7. 6.7 Optical and magneto-optical disks
    8. 6.8 Equalization and data separation
    9. 6.9 Slicing and jitter rejection
    10. 6.10 Channel coding
    11. 6.11 Simple codes
    12. 6.12 Group codes
    13. 6.13 Randomizing and encryption
    14. 6.14 Synchronizing
    15. 6.15 Basic error correction
    16. 6.16 Concealment by interpolation
    17. 6.17 Parity
    18. 6.18 Block and convolutional codes
    19. 6.19 Cyclic codes
    20. 6.20 Introduction to the Reed–Solomon codes
    21. 6.21 Correction by erasure
    22. 6.22 Interleaving
    23. 6.23 Product codes
  13. 7. Transmission
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 The AES/EBU interface
    3. 7.3 Channel status
    4. 7.4 User bits
    5. 7.5 MADI–Multi-channel audio digital interface
    6. 7.6 Fibre-optic interfacing
    7. 7.7 Synchronizing
    8. 7.8 Asynchronous operation
    9. 7.9 Routing and networks
    10. 7.10 Networks
    11. 7.11 FireWire
    12. 7.12 Broadband networks and ATM
    13. 7.13 Introduction to NICAM 728
    14. 7.14 Audio in digital television broadcasting
    15. 7.15 Packets and time stamps
    16. 7.16 MPEG transport streams
    17. 7.17 Clock references
    18. 7.18 Program Specific Information (PSI)
    19. 7.19 Introduction to DAB
  14. 8. Digital audio tape recorders
    1. 8.1 Rotary versus stationary heads
    2. 8.2 PCM adaptors
    3. 8.3 Introduction to DAT
    4. 8.4 DAT specification
    5. 8.5 DAT block diagram
    6. 8.6 Track following in DAT
    7. 8.7 DAT data channel
    8. 8.8 Multi-channel rotary-head recorders
    9. 8.9 Stationary-head recorders
    10. 8.10 DASH format
    11. 8.11 DCC – Digital Compact Cassette
  15. 9. Magnetic disk drives
    1. 9.1 Types of disk drive
    2. 9.2 Structure of disk
    3. 9.3 Principle of flying head
    4. 9.4 Reading and writing
    5. 9.5 Moving the heads
    6. 9.6 Rotation
    7. 9.7 Servo-surface disks
    8. 9.8 Soft sectoring
    9. 9.9 Winchester technology
    10. 9.10 Rotary positioners
    11. 9.11 The disk controller
    12. 9.12 Defect handling
    13. 9.13 Digital audio disk system
    14. 9.14 Arranging the audio data on disk
    15. 9.15 Spooling files
    16. 9.16 Broadcast applications
    17. 9.17 Sampling rate and playing time
  16. 10. Digital audio editing
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 Editing with random access media
    3. 10.3 Editing on recording media
    4. 10.4 The structure of an editor
    5. 10.5 Timecode
    6. 10.6 Locating the edit point
    7. 10.7 Editing with disk drives
    8. 10.8 Editing in DAT
    9. 10.9 Editing in open-reel digital recorders
    10. 10.10 Jump editing
  17. 11. Optical disks in digital audio
    1. 11.1 Types of optical disk
    2. 11.2 CD and MD contrasted
    3. 11.3 CD and MD – disk construction
    4. 11.4 Rejecting surface contamination
    5. 11.5 Playing optical disks
    6. 11.6 Focus and tracking systems
    7. 11.7 Typical pickups
    8. 11.8 CD readout in detail
    9. 11.9 How optical disks are made
    10. 11.10 How recordable MiniDiscs are made
    11. 11.11 Channel code of CD and MiniDisc
    12. 11.12 Error-correction strategy
    13. 11.13 Track layout of MD
    14. 11.14 Player structure
  18. Glossary
  19. Index