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Introducing GitHub, 2nd Edition by Brent Beer

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Chapter 7. Configuring Repositories and Organizations

So far we’ve looked at how to view, edit, and collaborate on repositories. In this chapter we’re going to take a step back and go through the process of configuring a GitHub repository for a new project.

Warning

If you’re working with developers on a contract basis, you’ll want to create the repository they use to work on. Creating the repository means that you’ll always have access to the code and the additional information contained in pull requests, issues, projects, and wikis. Once you’ve created it, you can then add the developers as collaborators so they’ll have access to the repository—until you decide to revoke it. You do not want contract developers to create the repository for you. If they do, they’ll be able to remove you from the repository at any time.

Configuring a Repository

To configure a repository, start by clicking the Settings tab at the top of the page. By default you’ll go to the Options menu within Settings, as shown in Figure 7-1, which allows you to configure some high-level settings.

Figure 7-1. The Settings→Options screen

The first available setting to change is the name of the repository. If you change the repo name in the text box, the Rename button will become active, allowing you to change the name of the project. Don’t worry if your developers are already connected to the project. They won’t ...

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