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Interoperability in Digital Public Services and Administration

Book Description

During the last decade, interoperability has emerged as a vivid research area in electronic business and electronic governance, promising a significant increase in productivity and efficiency of information systems, enterprises and administrations. Interoperability in Digital Public Services and Administration: Bridging E-Government and E-Business provides the latest research findings such as theoretical foundations, principles, methodologies, architectures, technical frameworks, international policy, standardization and case studies for the achievement of interoperability within the provision of digital services, from administration and businesses toward the user citizens and enterprises.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Editorial Advisory Board and List of Reviewers
    1. Editorial Advisory Board
    2. List of Reviewers
  5. Dedication
  6. Foreword: The Policy View
  7. Foreword: The Research View
  8. Foreword: The Industry View
  9. Preface
    1. INTEROPERABILITY, THE GREAT ENABLER
    2. OBJECTIVE OF THE BOOK
    3. TARGET AUDIENCE
    4. ORGANISATION OF THE BOOK
    5. AS A CONCLUSION
  10. Acknowledgment
  11. Section 1: Interoperability Guidelines, Frameworks and Standards
    1. Chapter 1: National Interoperability Frameworks
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BEST PRACTICES FROM NATIONAL INTEROPERABILITY FRAMEWORKS
      4. THE WAY FORWARD FOR NATIONAL INTEROPERABILITY FRAMEWORKS
      5. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 2: Setting the Dutch E-Government Interoperability Agenda
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. EARLIER EFFORTS: A BRIEF HISTORICAL OVERVIEW
      5. THE ‘POLDER’ PARTNERHIP
      6. EXAMPLE: E-INVOICING IN THE NETHERLANDS
      7. EXAMPLE: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE WCO DATAMODEL
      8. THE DUTCH E-GOVERNMENT INTEROPERABILITY AGENDA
      9. PREPARING THE INTEROPERABILITY AGENDA
      10. THE INTEROPERABILITY AGENDA
      11. PRIORITIES AND NEXT STEPS
    3. Chapter 3: The Challenges of Implementing e-Government Interoperability in Thailand
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEWS
      4. BACKGROUND
      5. TH e-GIF ADOPTION: A PILOT PROJECT
      6. IMPLEMENTATION
      7. KEY SUCCESS FACTORS
      8. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 4: e-Government Interoperability Framework in Lithuania
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. INTEROPERABILITY CONCEPTION
      4. CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS OF INTEROPERABILITY
      5. E-GOVERNMENT INTEROPERABILITY FRAMEWORK AND PRINCIPLES
      6. E-GOVERNMENT INTEROPERABILITY FRAMEWORKS IN EUROPE
      7. LITHUANIAN E-GOVERNMENT INTEROPERABILITY FRAMEWORK
    5. Chapter 5: Finding and Sharing e-Government Resources
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. FINDING AND SHARING E-GOVERNMENT RESOURCES
      5. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      6. CONCLUSION
    6. Chapter 6: Interoperability Requirements, Recommendations and Standards in 
e-Participation
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK AND APPROACH FOR INVESTIGATIONS
      4. BACKGROUND
      5. INTEROPERABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR E-PARTICIPATION AREAS
      6. INTEROPERABILITY STANDARDS IN E-PARTICIPATION
      7. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      8. CONCLUSION
  12. Section 2: Towards Best Practice: Case Studies and Exemplars of Web 2.0-Based Tertiary Teaching and Learning
    1. Chapter 7: Model-Driven Development of Interoperable, Inter-Organisational Business Processes
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CASE STUDY “ELECTRONIC VAT-STATEMENT TRANSACTION”
      4. MODEL-DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
      5. APPROACH FOR METAMODEL INTEGRATION
      6. MODEL TRANSFORMATION FOR MODEL-DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT
      7. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 8: The Semantic Interoperability Centre Europe
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. MULTIPLE LAYERS OF ADMINISTRATION
      4. FOCUS ON SEMANTICS
      5. METHODS FOR THE CREATION OF PAN-EUROPEAN ASSETS
      6. BUILDING A FRAMEWORK FOR THE NEGOTIATION OF MEANING
      7. A STRUCTURED CLEARING PROCESS FOR INTEROPERABILITY ASSETS
      8. A CASE OF REUSE TAXONOMIES FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EU SERVICES DIRECTIVE
      9. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 9: A Reference Architecture for Interoperable and Adaptive Processes
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND AND DELINEATION
      4. REFERENCE ARCHITECTURE FOR ORCHESTRATION OF SUBSIDY PROVISIONING PROCESSES
      5. PROTOTYPING THE ARCHITECTURE
      6. FUTURE TRENDS
      7. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 10: Interoperability
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. SERVICE ORIENTED ARCHITECTURAL FRAMEWORK
      4. EU-SD BUILDING BLOCK ELECTRONIC SAFE
      5. IDENTITY MANAGEMENT
    5. Chapter 11: Provision of Web 2.0 Services by Interoperable GIS-Powered Local Administration Portal Systems
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. CONCLUSION
    6. Chapter 12: Design and Standardisation of Core Directories for e-Government
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CORE DIRECTORIES FOR E-GOVERNMENT
      4. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
      5. CONCLUSION
    7. Chapter 13: Advancing Interoperability for Agile Cross-Organisational Collaboration
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. TECHNOLOGY COLLABORATION MAJOR INHIBITORS AND ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES
      4. APPLICATION USE CASE
      5. CONCLUSION
    8. Chapter 14: National Interoperability Approach for Social Services Information Management in Finland
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. INTEROPERABILITY ANALYSES AND SPECIFICATIONS IN THE TIKESOS PROJECT
      4. DISCUSSION
      5. CONCLUSION
  13. Section 3: Web 2.0 and Beyond: Current Implications and Future Directions for Web-Based Tertiary Teaching and Learning
    1. Chapter 15: Semantic Services for Business Documents Reconciliation
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
      4. A BRIEF RECAP OF THE ATHENA SEMANTIC RECONCILIATION APPROACH
      5. DECLARATIVE MAPPING DISCOVERY SERVICE
      6. OPERATIONAL MAPPING GENERATION SERVICE
      7. FUSION OF SEMANTIC TRANSFORMATION RULES
      8. RELATED WORKS
      9. CONCLUSION
    2. Chapter 16: Knowledge Interoperability of Parliaments’ and Government Agencies’ Information Systems
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. BACKGROUND
      4. SOURCES OF KNOWLEDGE IN PARLIAMENTS
      5. A METHODOLOGY FOR KNOWLEDGE LEVEL INTEROPERABILITY
      6. AN APPLICATION OF THE METHODOLOGY
      7. EVALUATION
      8. A GENERALIZATION
      9. CONCLUSION
    3. Chapter 17: Measuring the Benefit of Interoperability
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. LITERATURE REVIEW
      4. METHODOLOGY
      5. RESULTS
      6. CONCLUSION
    4. Chapter 18: Equipping the Enterprise Interoperability Problem Solver
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. EQUIPPING THE ENTERPRISE INTEROPERABILITY PROBLEM SOLVER
      4. ENTERPRISE INTERFACES AS A PIVOTAL CONCEPT
      5. FOUR PERSPECTIVES ON ENTERPRISE INTERFACES
      6. ENTERPRISE INTERFACES AS DESIGN PRODUCTS
      7. ENTERPRISE INTERFACES AS TRANSACTIONS
      8. ENTERPRISE INTERFACES AS REQUIREMENTS
      9. ENTERPRISE INTERFACES AS SUPRASTRUCTURE
      10. MODELS AND INSTRUMENTS
      11. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    5. Chapter 19: Towards a Scientific Foundation for Interoperability
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. A DECADE OF POLICY, RESEARCH AND STANDARDISATION
      4. THE INGREDIENTS OF INTEROPERABILITY
      5. THE SCIENTIFIC ELEMENTS OF INTEROPERABILITY
      6. NEIGHBORING SCIENTIFIC DOMAINS AND APPROACHES
      7. CONCLUSION
  14. Compilations of References
  15. About the Contributors
  16. Index