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International Journal of Systems and Society (IJSS) Volume 2, Issue 1

Book Description

The International Journal of Systems and Society (IJSS) is dedicated to support and encourage the publication of high quality articles that promote the way in which systems ideas are used. Papers are encouraged from practitioners, systems researchers, and systems academics. The focus of the journal is on the use and development of systems ideas within society and less on literature reviews, although some instances may occur where such papers are accepted. The journal encourages field research and research into real situations. All papers undergo a double blind peer review process and the difference in style of practitioner papers from academic is acknowledged. In the long tradition of the Systemist, opinion papers are considered for publication at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief.

This issue contains the following articles:

  • An Enterprise Complexity Model: Variety Engineering and Dynamic Capabilities
  • Classical Dressage: A Systemic Analysis
  • Paradigm Change From the Systemic View to Systems Science
  • Complex Processes and Social Systems: A Synergy of Perspectives
  • Applying a New Sub-Systems Model to Analyze Economic Policy and the Question of Systemic Persistence
  • An Extended Case Study Exploring the Effects of a Whole School Staff Pilot Wellbeing Programme on Eight Local Authority Primary Schools

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Masthead
  3. Call For Articles
  4. MembershipPage
  5. Editorial Preface
  6. An Enterprise Complexity Model:
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE VIPLAN METHOD AND THE NETWORK ECONOMY
    4. THE VIPLAN METHODOLOGY AND ENTERPRISES’ PROBLEM SOLVING
    5. THE SYSTEM IN FOCUS: ENTERPRISE, INSTITUTION AND ORGANISATIONAL SYSTEMS
    6. MODELING COMPLEXITY
    7. THE VIPLAN METHODOLOGY AND ENTERPRISE COMPLEXITY MODELS
    8. TRANSFORMATION, TECHNOLOGICAL, AND STRUCTURAL MODELS
    9. FOCUS ON RECONFIGURING RESOURCES AND RELATIONSHIPS
    10. ECMS AND PERFORMANCE
    11. CODA
    12. REFERENCES
    13. ENDNOTES
  7. Classical Dressage:
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND AND PROCESS
    4. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
    5. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    6. REFERENCES
  8. Paradigm Change From the Systemic View to Systems Science
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. 1. INTRODUCTION
    3. 2. VIEWING THINGS THROUGH PERCEPTION AS WHOLES
    4. 3. VIEWING THINGS THROUGH THE SUBJECT-PREDICATE CONSTRUCTION
    5. 4. VIEWING THINGS THROUGH THEIR STRUCTURE OR THE SYSTEMIC VIEW
    6. 5. CONCLUSION
    7. REFERENCES
  9. Complex Processes and Social Systems:
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. EPISTEMOLOGY, INTERACTIONS AND SYSTEMS
    4. COMPLEX RESPONSIVE PROCESSES
    5. COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS
    6. FEEDBACK LOOPS, SELF-ORGANISATION AND ATTRACTORS
    7. TOWARDS A SYNERGY OF PERSPECTIVES
    8. SUMMARY: YOU CAN STOP WHAT YOU’RE DOING, BUT YOU CAN’T STOP TIME
    9. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    10. REFERENCES
  10. Applying a New Sub-Systems Model to Analyze Economic Policy and the Question of Systemic Persistence
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. SYSTEMS THEORY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
    3. CRITIQUES OF EASTON
    4. A MODIFIED ‘SUBSYSTEMIC’ APPROACH TO POLITICS
    5. DEFINING THE BOUNDARIES OF THE SUBSYSTEM
    6. INPUTS INTO THE SUBSYSTEM
    7. OUTPUTS FROM THE SUBSYSTEM
    8. APPLYING THE SUBSYSTEMIC MODEL TO THE KOREAN CASE
    9. VARIATION IN THE SIZE OF THE INPUT GENERATING GROUP
    10. KOREA'S DEMOCRATIZATION
    11. VARIATION IN POLICY OUTPUT
    12. DIRECTLY MEASURING CHANGES IN POLICY OUTPUT
    13. PRIVATE GOODS WITH A SMALL RULING COALITION
    14. PUBLIC GOODS WITH A LARGER RULING COALITION
    15. THE NEXT STEP: EXPLORING THE COLLAPSE OF DOMESTIC POLITICAL SYSTEMS
    16. CONCLUSION
    17. REFERENCES
    18. ENDNOTES
  11. An Extended Case Study Exploring the Effects of a Whole School Staff Pilot Wellbeing Programme on Eight Local Authority Primary Schools
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. AUTHOR CONTEXT AND METHODOLOGY
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. THE PILOT WELLBEING PROGRAMME (PWP)
    5. AIMS
    6. IMPLEMENTATION AND METHODOLOGY
    7. HOW THE PWP DIFFERED FROM WHAT HAD GONE BEFORE
    8. EVALUATION
    9. CONCLUSION
    10. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    11. REFERENCES
  12. The Systems View of Life: A Unifying Vision
    1. SUMMARISING THE CONTENT
    2. WHAT DOES IT TELL US ABOUT SYSTEMS?
    3. SUMMARY
  13. Call For Articles