You are previewing International Handbook of Work and Health Psychology, 3rd Edition.
O'Reilly logo
International Handbook of Work and Health Psychology, 3rd Edition

Book Description

Now in its third edition, this authoritative handbook offers a comprehensive and up-to-date survey of work and health psychology.

  • Updated edition of a highly successful handbook

  • Focuses on the applied aspects of work and health psychology

  • New chapters cover emerging themes in this rapidly growing field

  • Prestigious team of editors and contributors

  • Table of Contents

    1. Cover
    2. Title page
    3. About the Editors
    4. List of Contributors
    5. CHAPTER 1: Introduction
      1. 1.1 THE THIRD EDITION
      2. 1.2 THE CONTEXT OF WORK AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
      3. 1.3 THE OUTLINE
      4. REFERENCES
    6. PART I: The Context of Work and Health Today
      1. CHAPTER 2: Health and Well-Being: The Role of the Psychological Contract
        1. 2.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 2.2 WHAT IS THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT AND WHY IS IT RELEVANT TO THE STUDY OF EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND WELL-BEING?
        3. 2.3 RESEARCHING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT AND OUTCOMES
        4. 2.4 STUDIES OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT AND WELL-BEING
        5. 2.5 POLICIES AND PRACTICES TO PROMOTE THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CONTRACT
        6. 2.6 CONCLUSIONS
        7. REFERENCES
      2. CHAPTER 3: The Social Context of Work Life: Implications for Burnout and Work Engagement
        1. 3.1 DEFINITIONS AND BACKGROUND
        2. 3.2 PREDICTORS: DEMANDS, RESOURCES AND VALUES
        3. 3.3 THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT OF WORK
        4. 3.4 INCLUDING SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT INTO RESEARCH MODELS OF BURNOUT AND ENGAGEMENT
        5. 3.5 PROPOSED MODEL AND RESEARCH QUESTIONS
        6. REFERENCES
      3. CHAPTER 4: The Effects of Job Strain on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease
        1. 4.1 THE OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE OF THE REVIEW
        2. 4.2 A GENERAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE STUDY OF THE HEALTH CONSEQUENCES OF STRESS AT WORK
        3. 4.3 MODELS EXPLAINING THE EFFECTS OF WORK STRESS ON PHYSIOLOGICAL RISK FACTORS
        4. 4.4 THE JDC-S MODEL AND BLOOD LIPIDS
        5. 4.5 THE JDC-S MODEL AND BLOOD PRESSURE
        6. 4.6 THE JDC-S MODEL AND MICRO-INFLAMMATION BIOMARKERS
        7. 4.7 THE JDC-S MODEL AND SLEEP PROBLEMS
        8. 4.8 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
        9. REFERENCES
      4. CHAPTER 5: Sickness Presenteeism and Attendance Pressure Factors: Implications for Practice
        1. 5.1 DEFINING SICKNESS PRESENTEEISM
        2. 5.2 CONSEQUENCES OF PRESENTEEISM AND ABSENTEEISM
        3. 5.3 PREDICTORS OF SICKNESS PRESENTEEISM
        4. 5.4 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
        5. REFERENCES
    7. PART II: Individual Differences and Health
      1. CHAPTER 6: Individual Differences, Work Stress and Health
        1. 6.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 6.2 INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AND STRESS EXPERIENCES: BASIC MECHANISMS
        3. 6.3 WHAT MAKES STRESSORS STRESSFUL? THE ROLE OF GOALS AND ASPIRATIONS IN THE STRESS PROCESS
        4. 6.4 VULNERABLE VS. RESILIENT PERSONS
        5. 6.5 RESPONSE TENDENCIES AND COPING
        6. 6.6 FINAL COMMENTS
        7. REFERENCES
      2. CHAPTER 7: Gender and Work Stress: Unique Stressors, Unique Responses
        1. 7.1 UNIQUE STRESSORS FOR WORKING WOMEN
        2. 7.2 RESPONSES TO WORKPLACE STRESSORS
        3. 7.3 <i xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:ibooks="http://vocabulary.itunes.apple.com/rdf/ibooks/vocabulary-extensions-1.0">WITHIN</i>-GROUP GENDER STRESSORS?-GROUP GENDER STRESSORS?
        4. 7.4 SUMMARY
        5. REFERENCES
      3. CHAPTER 8: Work Experiences, Stress and Health among Managerial Women: Research and Practice
        1. 8.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 8.2 WORK EXPERIENCES OF MANAGERIAL WOMEN AND MEN
        3. 8.3 OCCUPATIONAL STRESS AND HEALTH
        4. 8.4 RESEARCH AND PRACTICE
        5. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
        6. REFERENCES
    8. PART III: The Role of Workplace Factors on Health
      1. CHAPTER 9: The Role of Job Control in Employee Health and Well-Being
        1. 9.1 CONTROL AND STRESS IN THE WORKPLACE
        2. 9.2 MODELS OF CONTROL AND STRESS
        3. 9.3 CONTROL PREDISPOSITIONS
        4. 9.4 MOVING FORWARD
        5. REFERENCES
      2. CHAPTER 10: Stress and Careers
        1. 10.1 PERSONAL DIFFERENCES
        2. 10.2 WHAT IS THE ‘RIGHT’ LEVEL OF STRESS?
        3. 10.3 STRESS MANAGEMENT – ORGANIZATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
        4. 10.4 A PORTFOLIO OF STRESS-RELATED CAREER MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
        5. 10.5 INDIVIDUAL IMPLICATIONS
        6. 10.6 MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS
        7. 10.7 WHOSE JOB IT IS?
        8. REFERENCES
      3. CHAPTER 11: New Technologies and Stress
        1. 11.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 11.2 THE IMPACT OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES ON STRESS
        3. 11.3 RESEARCH INTO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES
        4. 11.4 PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS
        5. 11.5 CONCLUSION
        6. REFERENCES
      4. CHAPTER 12: Flexibility at Work in Relation to Employee Health
        1. 12.1 PHYSIOLOGICAL FLEXIBILITY
        2. 12.2 PSYCHOLOGICAL FLEXIBILITY
        3. 12.3 ORGANIZATIONAL FLEXIBILITY
        4. 12.4 PHYSIOLOGICAL COUNTERPARTS OF THE DEMAND-CONTROL-SUPPORT MODEL
        5. 12.5 COMBINING THE INDIVIDUAL’S NEED FOR FLEXIBILITY WITH THAT OF THE WORK ORGANIZATION
        6. 12.6 PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVES
        7. REFERENCES
      5. CHAPTER 13: Acute Stress at Work
        1. 13.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 13.2 WHAT IS ACUTE STRESS?
        3. 13.3 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND
        4. 13.4 THE PROCESS OF COPING
        5. 13.5 LONG-TERM DISTURBANCES
        6. 13.6 RISK FACTORS
        7. 13.7 INTERVENTION
        8. 13.8 CONCLUSIONS
        9. REFERENCES
    9. PART IV: Supporting Individuals at Work
      1. CHAPTER 14: Management Development for Well-Being and Survival: Developing the Whole Person
        1. 14.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 14.2 MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT WITHIN ORGANIZATIONS AS COMPLEX OPEN SYSTEMS
        3. 14.3 THE MANAGER’S WHOLE-LIFE MODEL: FIVE ARENAS OF LIFE
        4. 14.4 DEVELOPMENT IN THE PERSONAL ARENA
        5. 14.5 DEVELOPMENT IN THE WORK ARENA
        6. 14.6 STAYING ALIVE
        7. 14.7 CONCLUSION
        8. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
        9. REFERENCES
      2. CHAPTER 15: Coaching in Organizations
        1. 15.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 15.2 THE PURPOSE OF COACHING IN ORGANIZATIONS
        3. 15.3 THE COACHING PROCESS
        4. 15.4 APPLICATIONS
        5. 15.5 CASE EXAMPLES
        6. 15.6 FUTURE OF COACHING IN ORGANIZATIONS
        7. REFERENCES
      3. CHAPTER 16: Women’s Coping: Communal Versus Individualistic Orientation
        1. 16.1 STRESSORS IN THE WORKPLACE
        2. 16.2 EXAMINING THE MODEL OF RUGGED INDIVIDUALISM
        3. 16.3 THE STRESS OF WORK AND ITS INFLUENCE ON WOMEN
        4. 16.4 JOB-RELATED STRESSORS UNIQUE TO WOMEN
        5. 16.5 WORKPLACE SUPPORT
        6. 16.6 EMPHASIS ON INDIVIDUALISTIC ORIENTATION IN THE WORKPLACE
        7. 16.7 STRESS AT HOME
        8. 16.8 WORK–FAMILY ROLE CONFLICT
        9. 16.9 HOME-BASED SUPPORT
        10. 16.10 COMMUNAL ORIENTATION: DEVELOPING A COLLECTIVIST PERSPECTIVE
        11. 16.11 THE MULTIAXIAL MODEL OF COPING
        12. 16.12 HOW THE MULTIAXIAL MODEL OF COPING CHANGES COMMON COPING ASSUMPTIONS
        13. 16.13 IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERVENTION
        14. 16.14 CONCLUSIONS
        15. REFERENCES
      4. CHAPTER 17: Employee Assistance Programs: A Research-Based Primer
        1. 17.1 INTRODUCTION
        2. 17.2 WORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTIONS
        3. 17.3 PROFILE OF EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
        4. 17.4 EAP OUTCOMES AND BUSINESS VALUE
        5. 17.5 FUTURE TRENDS IN EAP
        6. 17.6 CONCLUSION
        7. REFERENCES
    10. PART V: Organizational Approaches to Health and Well-Being
      1. CHAPTER 18: Organizational Culture, Leadership, Change and Stress
        1. 18.1 LEADERSHIP AND STRESS
        2. 18.2 ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT
        3. 18.3 TRANSFORMATIONAL PROCESSES
        4. 18.4 CONCLUSIONS
        5. REFERENCES
      2. CHAPTER 19: Building Interventions to Improve Staff Well-Being
        1. 19.1 BUILDING THE BUSINESS CASE
        2. 19.2 MEASURING WELL-BEING AND ENGAGEMENT LEVELS
        3. 19.3 A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO TAKING ACTION TO IMPROVE WORKING LIVES
        4. 19.4 SUMMARY
        5. REFERENCES
      3. CHAPTER 20: Stress and Effectiveness: An Approach for Changing Organizational Culture<sup xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xmlns:epub="http://www.idpf.org/2007/ops" xmlns:m="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:svg="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:ibooks="http://vocabulary.itunes.apple.com/rdf/ibooks/vocabulary-extensions-1.0">1</sup>
        1. 20.1 INTRODUCTION: ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, EVERYDAY REALITY AND STRESS
        2. 20.2 EVERYDAY WORK: STABILITY AND CHANGE
        3. 20.3 THE WORK ITSELF
        4. 20.4 THE WORK ENVIRONMENT: ORDERLINESS
        5. 20.5 THE WORK ENVIRONMENT: SOCIAL EMBEDDING
        6. 20.6 THE WORK ENVIRONMENT: COMPATIBILITY OF CONVICTIONS, VALUES AND GOALS
        7. 20.7 INTERVENTIONS
        8. REFERENCES
      4. CHAPTER 21: Epilogue
        1. 21.1 A MORE POSITIVE FUTURE
        2. 21.2 PSYCHOLOGICALLY HEALTHY WORKPLACES
        3. 21.3 INTERVENTIONS
        4. REFERENCES
    11. Index
    12. End User License Agreement