You are previewing INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition.

INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition

Cover of INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition by Yvonne Rogers... Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. What's Inside
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. About the Authors
  8. Chapter 1: WHAT IS INTERACTION DESIGN?
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Good and Poor Design
    3. 1.3 What Is Interaction Design?
    4. 1.4 The User Experience
    5. 1.5 The Process of Interaction Design
    6. 1.6 Interaction Design and the User Experience
    7. Further Reading
  9. Chapter 2: UNDERSTANDING AND CONCEPTUALIZING INTERACTION
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Understanding the Problem Space and Conceptualizing Design
    3. 2.3 Conceptual Models
    4. 2.4 Interface Metaphors
    5. 2.5 Interaction Types
    6. 2.6 Paradigms, Theories, Models, and Frameworks
    7. Further Reading
  10. Chapter 3: COGNITIVE ASPECTS
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 What Is Cognition?
    3. 3.3 Cognitive Frameworks
    4. Further Reading
  11. Chapter 4: SOCIAL INTERACTION
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Being Social
    3. 4.3 Face-to-Face Conversations
    4. 4.4 Remote Conversations
    5. 4.5 Telepresence
    6. 4.6 Co-presence
    7. 4.7 Emergent Social Phenomena
    8. Further Reading
  12. Chapter 5: EMOTIONAL INTERACTION
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Emotions and the User Experience
    3. 5.3 Expressive Interfaces
    4. 5.4 Frustrating Interfaces
    5. 5.5 Persuasive Technologies and Behavioral Change
    6. 5.6 Anthropomorphism and Zoomorphism
    7. 5.7 Models of Emotion
    8. Further Reading
  13. Chapter 6: INTERFACES
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Interface Types
    3. 6.3 Natural User Interfaces
    4. 6.4 Which Interface?
    5. Further Reading
  14. Chapter 7: DATA GATHERING
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Five Key Issues
    3. 7.4 Interviews
    4. 7.5 Questionnaires
    5. 7.6 Observation
    6. 7.7 Choosing and Combining Techniques
    7. Further Reading
  15. Chapter 8: DATA ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND PRESENTATION
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Qualitative and Quantitative
    3. 8.3 Simple Quantitative Analysis
    4. 8.4 Simple Qualitative Analysis
    5. 8.5 Tools to Support Data Analysis
    6. 8.6 Using Theoretical Frameworks
    7. 8.7 Presenting the Findings
    8. Further Reading
  16. Chapter 9: THE PROCESS OF INTERACTION DESIGN
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 What Is Involved in Interaction Design?
    3. 9.3 Some Practical Issues
    4. Further Reading
  17. Chapter 10: ESTABLISHING REQUIREMENTS
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 What, How, and Why?
    3. 10.3 What Are Requirements?
    4. 10.4 Data Gathering for Requirements
    5. 10.5 Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Presentation
    6. 10.6 Task Description
    7. 10.7 Task Analysis
    8. Further Reading
  18. Chapter 11: DESIGN, PROTOTYPING, AND CONSTRUCTION
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Prototyping and Construction
    3. 11.3 Conceptual Design: Moving from Requirements to First Design
    4. 11.4 Physical Design: Getting Concrete
    5. 11.5 Using Scenarios in Design
    6. 11.6 Using Prototypes in Design
    7. 11.7 Support for Design
    8. Further Reading
  19. Chapter 12: INTRODUCING EVALUATION
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 The Why, What, Where, and When of Evaluation
    3. 12.3 Types of Evaluation
    4. 12.4 Evaluation Case Studies
    5. 12.5 What Did We Learn from the Case Studies?
    6. Further Reading
  20. Chapter 13: AN EVALUATION FRAMEWORK
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 DECIDE: A Framework to Guide Evaluation
    3. Further Reading
  21. Chapter 14: EVALUATION STUDIES: FROM CONTROLLED TO NATURAL SETTINGS
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Usability Testing
    3. 14.3 Conducting Experiments
    4. 14.4 Field Studies
    5. Further Reading
  22. Chapter 15: EVALUATION: INSPECTIONS, ANALYTICS, AND MODELS
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 Inspections: Heuristic Evaluation and Walkthroughs
    3. 15.3 Analytics
    4. 15.4 Predictive Models
    5. Further Reading
  23. References
  24. Credits
  25. Index
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Chapter 14

EVALUATION STUDIES: FROM CONTROLLED TO NATURAL SETTINGS

  • 14.1 Introduction
  • 14.2 Usability Testing
  • 14.3 Conducting Experiments
  • 14.4 Field Studies

Objectives

The main aims of this chapter are to:

  • Explain how to do usability testing.
  • Outline the basics of experimental design.
  • Describe how to do field studies.

14.1 Introduction

Imagine you have designed a new shared web space intended for advertising second-hand goods. How would you find out whether householders would be able to use it to find what they wanted and whether it was a reliable and effective service? What evaluation methods would you employ?

In this chapter we describe evaluation studies that take place in a spectrum of settings, from controlled laboratories to natural settings. Within this spectrum we focus on usability testing which takes place in usability labs; experiments which take place in research labs; and field studies which take place in natural settings such as people's homes, work, and leisure environments.

14.2 Usability Testing

The usability of products has traditionally been tested in controlled laboratory settings. This approach emphasizes how usable a product is. It has been most commonly used to evaluate desktop applications, such as websites, word processors, and search tools. Doing usability testing in a laboratory, or a temporarily assigned controlled environment, enables evaluators to control what users do and to control environmental and social influences that might impact the users, ...

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