You are previewing INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition.

INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition

Cover of INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition by Yvonne Rogers... Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. What's Inside
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. About the Authors
  8. Chapter 1: WHAT IS INTERACTION DESIGN?
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Good and Poor Design
    3. 1.3 What Is Interaction Design?
    4. 1.4 The User Experience
    5. 1.5 The Process of Interaction Design
    6. 1.6 Interaction Design and the User Experience
    7. Further Reading
  9. Chapter 2: UNDERSTANDING AND CONCEPTUALIZING INTERACTION
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Understanding the Problem Space and Conceptualizing Design
    3. 2.3 Conceptual Models
    4. 2.4 Interface Metaphors
    5. 2.5 Interaction Types
    6. 2.6 Paradigms, Theories, Models, and Frameworks
    7. Further Reading
  10. Chapter 3: COGNITIVE ASPECTS
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 What Is Cognition?
    3. 3.3 Cognitive Frameworks
    4. Further Reading
  11. Chapter 4: SOCIAL INTERACTION
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Being Social
    3. 4.3 Face-to-Face Conversations
    4. 4.4 Remote Conversations
    5. 4.5 Telepresence
    6. 4.6 Co-presence
    7. 4.7 Emergent Social Phenomena
    8. Further Reading
  12. Chapter 5: EMOTIONAL INTERACTION
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Emotions and the User Experience
    3. 5.3 Expressive Interfaces
    4. 5.4 Frustrating Interfaces
    5. 5.5 Persuasive Technologies and Behavioral Change
    6. 5.6 Anthropomorphism and Zoomorphism
    7. 5.7 Models of Emotion
    8. Further Reading
  13. Chapter 6: INTERFACES
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Interface Types
    3. 6.3 Natural User Interfaces
    4. 6.4 Which Interface?
    5. Further Reading
  14. Chapter 7: DATA GATHERING
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Five Key Issues
    3. 7.4 Interviews
    4. 7.5 Questionnaires
    5. 7.6 Observation
    6. 7.7 Choosing and Combining Techniques
    7. Further Reading
  15. Chapter 8: DATA ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND PRESENTATION
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Qualitative and Quantitative
    3. 8.3 Simple Quantitative Analysis
    4. 8.4 Simple Qualitative Analysis
    5. 8.5 Tools to Support Data Analysis
    6. 8.6 Using Theoretical Frameworks
    7. 8.7 Presenting the Findings
    8. Further Reading
  16. Chapter 9: THE PROCESS OF INTERACTION DESIGN
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 What Is Involved in Interaction Design?
    3. 9.3 Some Practical Issues
    4. Further Reading
  17. Chapter 10: ESTABLISHING REQUIREMENTS
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 What, How, and Why?
    3. 10.3 What Are Requirements?
    4. 10.4 Data Gathering for Requirements
    5. 10.5 Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Presentation
    6. 10.6 Task Description
    7. 10.7 Task Analysis
    8. Further Reading
  18. Chapter 11: DESIGN, PROTOTYPING, AND CONSTRUCTION
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Prototyping and Construction
    3. 11.3 Conceptual Design: Moving from Requirements to First Design
    4. 11.4 Physical Design: Getting Concrete
    5. 11.5 Using Scenarios in Design
    6. 11.6 Using Prototypes in Design
    7. 11.7 Support for Design
    8. Further Reading
  19. Chapter 12: INTRODUCING EVALUATION
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 The Why, What, Where, and When of Evaluation
    3. 12.3 Types of Evaluation
    4. 12.4 Evaluation Case Studies
    5. 12.5 What Did We Learn from the Case Studies?
    6. Further Reading
  20. Chapter 13: AN EVALUATION FRAMEWORK
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 DECIDE: A Framework to Guide Evaluation
    3. Further Reading
  21. Chapter 14: EVALUATION STUDIES: FROM CONTROLLED TO NATURAL SETTINGS
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Usability Testing
    3. 14.3 Conducting Experiments
    4. 14.4 Field Studies
    5. Further Reading
  22. Chapter 15: EVALUATION: INSPECTIONS, ANALYTICS, AND MODELS
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 Inspections: Heuristic Evaluation and Walkthroughs
    3. 15.3 Analytics
    4. 15.4 Predictive Models
    5. Further Reading
  23. References
  24. Credits
  25. Index
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Chapter 7

DATA GATHERING

  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Five Key Issues
  • 7.3 Data Recording
  • 7.4 Interviews
  • 7.5 Questionnaires
  • 7.6 Observation
  • 7.7 Choosing and Combining Techniques

Objectives

The main aims of the chapter are to:

  • Discuss how to plan and run a successful data gathering program.
  • Enable you to plan and run an interview.
  • Enable you to design a simple questionnaire.
  • Enable you to plan and execute an observation.

7.1 Introduction

This chapter presents some techniques for data gathering which are commonly used in interaction design activities. In particular, data gathering is a central part of establishing requirements, and of evaluation. Within the requirements activity, the purpose of data gathering is to collect sufficient, accurate, and relevant data so that a set of stable requirements can be produced; within evaluation, data gathering is needed in order to capture users' reactions and performance with a system or prototype.

In this chapter we introduce three main techniques for gathering data: interviews, questionnaires, and observation. In the next chapter we discuss how to analyze and interpret the data collected. Interviews involve an interviewer asking one or more interviewees a set of questions which may be highly structured or unstructured; interviews are usually synchronous and are often face-to-face, but they don't have to be. Questionnaires are a series of questions designed to be answered asynchronously, i.e. without the presence of the investigator; these may ...

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