You are previewing INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition.

INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition

Cover of INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition by Yvonne Rogers... Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. What's Inside
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. About the Authors
  8. Chapter 1: WHAT IS INTERACTION DESIGN?
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Good and Poor Design
    3. 1.3 What Is Interaction Design?
    4. 1.4 The User Experience
    5. 1.5 The Process of Interaction Design
    6. 1.6 Interaction Design and the User Experience
    7. Further Reading
  9. Chapter 2: UNDERSTANDING AND CONCEPTUALIZING INTERACTION
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Understanding the Problem Space and Conceptualizing Design
    3. 2.3 Conceptual Models
    4. 2.4 Interface Metaphors
    5. 2.5 Interaction Types
    6. 2.6 Paradigms, Theories, Models, and Frameworks
    7. Further Reading
  10. Chapter 3: COGNITIVE ASPECTS
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 What Is Cognition?
    3. 3.3 Cognitive Frameworks
    4. Further Reading
  11. Chapter 4: SOCIAL INTERACTION
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Being Social
    3. 4.3 Face-to-Face Conversations
    4. 4.4 Remote Conversations
    5. 4.5 Telepresence
    6. 4.6 Co-presence
    7. 4.7 Emergent Social Phenomena
    8. Further Reading
  12. Chapter 5: EMOTIONAL INTERACTION
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Emotions and the User Experience
    3. 5.3 Expressive Interfaces
    4. 5.4 Frustrating Interfaces
    5. 5.5 Persuasive Technologies and Behavioral Change
    6. 5.6 Anthropomorphism and Zoomorphism
    7. 5.7 Models of Emotion
    8. Further Reading
  13. Chapter 6: INTERFACES
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Interface Types
    3. 6.3 Natural User Interfaces
    4. 6.4 Which Interface?
    5. Further Reading
  14. Chapter 7: DATA GATHERING
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Five Key Issues
    3. 7.4 Interviews
    4. 7.5 Questionnaires
    5. 7.6 Observation
    6. 7.7 Choosing and Combining Techniques
    7. Further Reading
  15. Chapter 8: DATA ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND PRESENTATION
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Qualitative and Quantitative
    3. 8.3 Simple Quantitative Analysis
    4. 8.4 Simple Qualitative Analysis
    5. 8.5 Tools to Support Data Analysis
    6. 8.6 Using Theoretical Frameworks
    7. 8.7 Presenting the Findings
    8. Further Reading
  16. Chapter 9: THE PROCESS OF INTERACTION DESIGN
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 What Is Involved in Interaction Design?
    3. 9.3 Some Practical Issues
    4. Further Reading
  17. Chapter 10: ESTABLISHING REQUIREMENTS
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 What, How, and Why?
    3. 10.3 What Are Requirements?
    4. 10.4 Data Gathering for Requirements
    5. 10.5 Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Presentation
    6. 10.6 Task Description
    7. 10.7 Task Analysis
    8. Further Reading
  18. Chapter 11: DESIGN, PROTOTYPING, AND CONSTRUCTION
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Prototyping and Construction
    3. 11.3 Conceptual Design: Moving from Requirements to First Design
    4. 11.4 Physical Design: Getting Concrete
    5. 11.5 Using Scenarios in Design
    6. 11.6 Using Prototypes in Design
    7. 11.7 Support for Design
    8. Further Reading
  19. Chapter 12: INTRODUCING EVALUATION
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 The Why, What, Where, and When of Evaluation
    3. 12.3 Types of Evaluation
    4. 12.4 Evaluation Case Studies
    5. 12.5 What Did We Learn from the Case Studies?
    6. Further Reading
  20. Chapter 13: AN EVALUATION FRAMEWORK
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 DECIDE: A Framework to Guide Evaluation
    3. Further Reading
  21. Chapter 14: EVALUATION STUDIES: FROM CONTROLLED TO NATURAL SETTINGS
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Usability Testing
    3. 14.3 Conducting Experiments
    4. 14.4 Field Studies
    5. Further Reading
  22. Chapter 15: EVALUATION: INSPECTIONS, ANALYTICS, AND MODELS
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 Inspections: Heuristic Evaluation and Walkthroughs
    3. 15.3 Analytics
    4. 15.4 Predictive Models
    5. Further Reading
  23. References
  24. Credits
  25. Index
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Chapter 4

SOCIAL INTERACTION

  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Being Social
  • 4.3 Face-to-Face Conversations
  • 4.4 Remote Conversations
  • 4.5 Telepresence
  • 4.6 Co-presence
  • 4.7 Emergent Social Phenomena

Objectives

The main aims of this chapter are to:

  • Explain what is meant by social interaction.
  • Describe the social mechanisms that are used by people when communicating and collaborating.
  • Discuss how social media have changed the ways in which we keep in touch, make contact, and manage our social and work lives.
  • Explain what is meant by telepresence.
  • Give an overview of shareable technologies and some of the studies showing how they can facilitate collaboration and group participation.
  • Describe some of the new forms of social behavior that have emerged as a result of using new social media and communication technologies.

4.1 Introduction

Imagine not having access to your cell phone or the Internet for a week. How would you cope? Would you get bored, start twitching, or even go stir crazy? Would you feel isolated and be constantly wondering what is happening in your online social network? Many people now cannot go for very long without checking the latest postings, emails, etc. on their Black-Berries, iPhones, or computers – even when on vacation. It has become a daily routine and an integral part of their social lives. This is not surprising given that humans are inherently social: they live together, work together, learn together, play together, interact and talk with each other, and socialize. ...

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