You are previewing INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition.

INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition

Cover of INTERACTION DESIGN: beyond human-computer interaction, 3rd Edition by Yvonne Rogers... Published by John Wiley & Sons
  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. What's Inside
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. About the Authors
  8. Chapter 1: WHAT IS INTERACTION DESIGN?
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Good and Poor Design
    3. 1.3 What Is Interaction Design?
    4. 1.4 The User Experience
    5. 1.5 The Process of Interaction Design
    6. 1.6 Interaction Design and the User Experience
    7. Further Reading
  9. Chapter 2: UNDERSTANDING AND CONCEPTUALIZING INTERACTION
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Understanding the Problem Space and Conceptualizing Design
    3. 2.3 Conceptual Models
    4. 2.4 Interface Metaphors
    5. 2.5 Interaction Types
    6. 2.6 Paradigms, Theories, Models, and Frameworks
    7. Further Reading
  10. Chapter 3: COGNITIVE ASPECTS
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 What Is Cognition?
    3. 3.3 Cognitive Frameworks
    4. Further Reading
  11. Chapter 4: SOCIAL INTERACTION
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Being Social
    3. 4.3 Face-to-Face Conversations
    4. 4.4 Remote Conversations
    5. 4.5 Telepresence
    6. 4.6 Co-presence
    7. 4.7 Emergent Social Phenomena
    8. Further Reading
  12. Chapter 5: EMOTIONAL INTERACTION
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Emotions and the User Experience
    3. 5.3 Expressive Interfaces
    4. 5.4 Frustrating Interfaces
    5. 5.5 Persuasive Technologies and Behavioral Change
    6. 5.6 Anthropomorphism and Zoomorphism
    7. 5.7 Models of Emotion
    8. Further Reading
  13. Chapter 6: INTERFACES
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Interface Types
    3. 6.3 Natural User Interfaces
    4. 6.4 Which Interface?
    5. Further Reading
  14. Chapter 7: DATA GATHERING
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Five Key Issues
    3. 7.4 Interviews
    4. 7.5 Questionnaires
    5. 7.6 Observation
    6. 7.7 Choosing and Combining Techniques
    7. Further Reading
  15. Chapter 8: DATA ANALYSIS, INTERPRETATION, AND PRESENTATION
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Qualitative and Quantitative
    3. 8.3 Simple Quantitative Analysis
    4. 8.4 Simple Qualitative Analysis
    5. 8.5 Tools to Support Data Analysis
    6. 8.6 Using Theoretical Frameworks
    7. 8.7 Presenting the Findings
    8. Further Reading
  16. Chapter 9: THE PROCESS OF INTERACTION DESIGN
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 What Is Involved in Interaction Design?
    3. 9.3 Some Practical Issues
    4. Further Reading
  17. Chapter 10: ESTABLISHING REQUIREMENTS
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 What, How, and Why?
    3. 10.3 What Are Requirements?
    4. 10.4 Data Gathering for Requirements
    5. 10.5 Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Presentation
    6. 10.6 Task Description
    7. 10.7 Task Analysis
    8. Further Reading
  18. Chapter 11: DESIGN, PROTOTYPING, AND CONSTRUCTION
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Prototyping and Construction
    3. 11.3 Conceptual Design: Moving from Requirements to First Design
    4. 11.4 Physical Design: Getting Concrete
    5. 11.5 Using Scenarios in Design
    6. 11.6 Using Prototypes in Design
    7. 11.7 Support for Design
    8. Further Reading
  19. Chapter 12: INTRODUCING EVALUATION
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 The Why, What, Where, and When of Evaluation
    3. 12.3 Types of Evaluation
    4. 12.4 Evaluation Case Studies
    5. 12.5 What Did We Learn from the Case Studies?
    6. Further Reading
  20. Chapter 13: AN EVALUATION FRAMEWORK
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 DECIDE: A Framework to Guide Evaluation
    3. Further Reading
  21. Chapter 14: EVALUATION STUDIES: FROM CONTROLLED TO NATURAL SETTINGS
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Usability Testing
    3. 14.3 Conducting Experiments
    4. 14.4 Field Studies
    5. Further Reading
  22. Chapter 15: EVALUATION: INSPECTIONS, ANALYTICS, AND MODELS
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 Inspections: Heuristic Evaluation and Walkthroughs
    3. 15.3 Analytics
    4. 15.4 Predictive Models
    5. Further Reading
  23. References
  24. Credits
  25. Index
O'Reilly logo

What's Inside

Welcome to the third edition of Interaction Design: Beyond Human–Computer Interaction, and our interactive website at www.id-book.com. Building on the success of the previous editions, we have substantially updated and streamlined the material to provide a comprehensive introduction to the fast-growing and multidisciplinary field of interaction design. But rather than let the book continue to expand, this time we made a conscious effort to reduce its size – with a little help from our publisher. It now weighs less than the previous edition and is considerably thinner!

Our textbook is aimed primarily at undergraduate, masters, and doctoral students from a range of backgrounds studying introductory classes in human–computer interaction, interaction design, web design, software engineering, digital media, information systems, and information studies. It will also appeal to a wide range of professionals and technology users who can dip into it and learn about a specific approach, interface, or topic.

It is called Interaction Design: Beyond Human–Computer Interaction because interaction design is concerned with a broader scope of issues, topics, and methods than traditionally was the scope of human–computer interaction (HCI), with a focus on the diversity of design and evaluation processes involved. We define interaction design as

designing interactive products to support the way people communicate and interact in their everyday and working lives.

This relies on an understanding ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.