You are previewing Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Edition.
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Interaction Design: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Edition

Book Description

The classic text, Interaction Design by Sharp, Preece and Rogers is back in a fantastic new 2nd Edition!

New to this edition:

  • Completely updated to include new chapters on Interfaces, Data Gathering and Data Analysis and Interpretation, the latest information from recent research findings and new examples

  • Now in full colour

  • A lively and highly interactive Web site that will enable students to collaborate on experiments, compete in design competitions, collaborate on designs, find resources and communicate with others

  • A new practical and process-oriented approach showing not just what principals ought to apply, but crucially how they can be applied

"The best basis around for user-centered interaction design, both as a primer for students as an introduction to the field, and as a resource for research practitioners to fall back on. It should be labelled 'start here'."

—Pieter Jan Stappers, ID-StudioLab, Delft University of Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Contents
  5. Foreword
  6. Preface
    1. Changes from the first edition
    2. Special features
    3. Readership
    4. How to use this book
    5. Plan your own path
    6. Acknowledgements
    7. About the authors
  7. 1: What is interaction design?
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Good and Poor Design
    3. 1.3 What is interaction design?
    4. 1.4 The User Experience
    5. 1.5 The Process of Interaction Design
    6. 1.6 Interaction Design and the User Experience
    7. Assignment
    8. Summary
    9. Further Reading
    10. INTERVIEW: with Gitta Salomon
  8. 2: Understanding and conceptualizing interaction
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Understanding the Problem Space
    3. 2.3 Conceptualizing the Design Space
    4. 2.4 Theories, Models, and Frameworks
    5. Assignment
    6. Summary
    7. Further Reading
    8. INTERVIEW: with Terry Winograd
  9. 3: Understanding users
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 What is Cognition?
    3. 3.3 Cognitive Frameworks
    4. Assignment
    5. Summary
    6. Further Reading
  10. 4: Designing for collaboration and communication
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Social Mechanisms in Communication and Collaboration
    3. 4.3 Technology-mediated Social Phenomena
    4. Assignment
    5. Summary
    6. Further Reading
    7. INTERVIEW: with Abigail Sellen
  11. 5: Affective aspects
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 What are Affective Aspects?
    3. 5.3 Expressive Interfaces and Positive Emotions
    4. 5.4 Frustrating Interfaces and Negative Emotions
    5. 5.5 Persuasive Technologies
    6. 5.6 Anthropomorphism in Interaction Design
    7. 5.7 Interface Agents, Virtual Pets, and Interactive Toys
    8. 5.8 Models of Affective Aspects
    9. Assignment
    10. Summary
    11. Further Reading
  12. 6: Interfaces and interactions
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Paradigms
    3. 6.3 Interface Types
    4. 6.4 Which Interface?
    5. Assignment
    6. Summary
    7. Further Reading
  13. 7: Data gathering
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Four Key Issues
    3. 7.3 Data Recording
    4. 7.4 Interviews
    5. 7.5 Questionnaires
    6. 7.6 Observation
    7. 7.7 Choosing and combining techniques
    8. Assignment
    9. Summary
    10. Further Reading
    11. INTERVIEW: with Sara Bly
  14. 8: Data analysis, interpretation, and presentation
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Qualitative and Quantitative
    3. 8.3 Simple Quantitative Analysis
    4. 8.4 Simple Qualitative Analysis
    5. 8.5 Tools to Support Data Analysis
    6. 8.6 Using Theoretical Frameworks
    7. 8.7 Presenting the Findings
    8. Assignment
    9. Summary
    10. Further Reading
  15. 9: The process of interaction design
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 What is Involved in Interaction Design?
    3. 9.3 Some Practical Issues
    4. 9.4 Lifecycle Models: Showing how the Activities are Related
    5. Assignment
    6. Summary
    7. Further Reading
    8. INTERVIEW: with Gillian Crampton Smith
  16. 10: Identifying needs and establishing requirements
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 What, How, and Why?
    3. 10.3 What are Requirements?
    4. 10.4 Data Gathering for Requirements
    5. 10.5 Data Analysis, Interpretation, and Presentation
    6. 10.6 Task Description
    7. 10.7 Task Analysis
    8. Assignment
    9. Summary
    10. Further Reading
    11. INTERVIEW: with Suzanne Robertson
  17. 11: Design, prototyping, and construction
    1. 11.1 Introduction
    2. 11.2 Prototyping and Construction
    3. 11.3 Conceptual Design: Moving from Requirements to First Design
    4. 11.4 Physical Design: Getting Concrete
    5. 11.5 Using Scenarios in Design
    6. 11.6 Using Prototypes in Design
    7. 11.7 Tool Support
    8. Assignment
    9. Summary
    10. Further Reading
    11. INTERVIEW: with Karen Holtzblatt
  18. 12: Introducing evaluation
    1. 12.1 Introduction
    2. 12.2 The Why, What, Where, and When of Evaluation
    3. 12.3 Evaluation Approaches and Methods
    4. 12.4 Evaluation Case Studies
    5. 12.5 What did we Learn from the Case Studies?
    6. Assignment
    7. Summary
    8. Further Reading
  19. 13: An evaluation framework
    1. 13.1 Introduction
    2. 13.2 DECIDE: A Framework to Guide Evaluation
    3. Assignment
    4. Summary
    5. Further Reading
  20. 14: Usability testing and field studies
    1. 14.1 Introduction
    2. 14.2 Usability Testing
    3. 14.3 Field Studies
    4. Assignment
    5. Summary
    6. Further Reading
    7. INTERVIEW: with Ben Shneiderman
  21. 15: Analytical evaluation
    1. 15.1 Introduction
    2. 15.2 Inspections: Heuristic Evaluation
    3. 15.3 Inspections: Walkthroughs
    4. 15.4 Predictive Models
    5. Assignment
    6. Summary
    7. Further Reading
    8. INTERVIEW: with Jakob Nielsen
  22. References
  23. Credits
  24. Index