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Integration of Passive RF Front-End Components in SoCs

Book Description

Examining the most important developments in highly integrated wireless RF front-ends, this book describes and evaluates both active and passive solutions for on-chip high-Q filtering, and explores M-phase filters in depth. An accessible step-by-step approach is used to introduce everything an RF designer needs to know about these filters, including their various forms, principles of operation, and their performance against implementation-related imperfections. Real-world examples are described in depth, and detailed mathematical analyses demonstrate the practical quantification of pertinent circuit parameters.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title
  4. Copyright
  5. Table of Contents
  6. Notation
  7. Preface
  8. 1 Introduction to Highly Integrated and Tunable RF Receiver Front Ends
    1. 1.1 Introduction
    2. 1.2 Front-end integration challenges and system requirements
    3. 1.3 2G receiver SAW elimination
      1. 1.3.1 Mixer-first receivers
      2. 1.3.2 Active blocker cancellation
      3. 1.3.3 N-phase filtering
        1. Prototype RX measured results
      4. 1.3.4 SAW-less receivers with linear LNA
    4. 1.4 3G receiver SAW elimination
    5. 1.5 Summary and conclusions
  9. 2 Active Blocker-Cancellation Techniques in Receivers
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 Concept of receiver translational loop
    3. 2.3 Nonideal effects
      1. 2.3.1 LNA noise figure degradation
      2. 2.3.2 Gain mismatch
      3. 2.3.3 Phase mismatch
      4. 2.3.4 Impact of quadrature phase and gain errors in the feedforward path
      5. 2.3.5 Linearity requirements of the feedforward path
      6. 2.3.6 RX-LO feedthrough
      7. 2.3.7 LO phase noise
    4. 2.4 Circuit implementations
      1. 2.4.1 Low noise amplifier
      2. 2.4.2 Mixers of the feedforward path
    5. 2.5 Measurement results
    6. 2.6 Feedback blocker-cancellation techniques
    7. 2.7 Summary and conclusions
  10. 3 Impedance Transformation: Introduction to the Simplest On-Chip SAW Filter
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Impedance transformation by a 50% passive mixer
    3. 3.3 Application as on-chip SAW filter
    4. 3.4 Impact of harmonics on the sharpness of the proposed filter
    5. 3.5 Differential implementation
    6. 3.6 Summary and conclusions
  11. 4 Four-Phase High-Q Bandpass Filters
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Impedance transformation by a four-phase filter
    3. 4.3 Differential implementation of four-phase high-Q bandpass filter
    4. 4.4 Application as an on-chip SAW filter
    5. 4.5 Impact of harmonics on the sharpness of the proposed filter
    6. 4.6 Four-phase high-Q bandpass filter with a complex baseband impedance
    7. 4.7 Four-phase high-Q bandpass filter with quadrature RF inputs
    8. 4.8 Harmonic upconversion and downconversion
    9. 4.9 A SAW-less receiver with on-chip four-phase high-Q bandpass filters
    10. 4.10 Summary and conclusions
  12. 5 M-Phase High-Q Bandpass Filters
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Impedance transformation by M-phase filters
    3. 5.3 Differential implementation of M-phase high-Q filter
    4. 5.4 Application as an on-chip SAW filter
    5. 5.5 Impact of harmonics on the sharpness of the M-phase bandpass filter
    6. 5.6 M-phase high-Q filter with complex baseband impedances
    7. 5.7 M-phase high-Q bandpass filter with quadrature RF inputs
    8. 5.8 M-phase high-Q bandpass filter with N-phase complex bandpass filters
    9. 5.9 Harmonic upconversion
    10. 5.10 Summary and conclusions
  13. 6 Design of a Superheterodyne Receiver Using M-Phase Filters
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Proposed superheterodyne receiver architecture
      1. 6.2.1 Conventional M-phase high-Q bandpass filter
      2. 6.2.2 M-phase bandpass filter with complex impedance
      3. 6.2.3 Realization of complex impedance with switches and capacitors
    3. 6.3 Design and implementation of the receiver chain
      1. 6.3.1 Four/16-phase high-Q bandpass filter centered at fRF = fLO+fIF
      2. 6.3.2 Front-end circuits
    4. 6.4 Measurement results
    5. 6.5 Summary and conclusions
  14. 7 Impact of Imperfections on the Performance of M-phase Filters
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Mathematical background
    3. 7.3 LO phase noise
    4. 7.4 Second-order nonlinearity in the switches of the bandpass filter
    5. 7.5 Quadrature error in the original 50% duty-cycle clock phases
    6. 7.6 Harmonic downconversion
    7. 7.7 Thermal noise of switches
    8. 7.8 Parasitic capacitors of switches
    9. 7.9 Switch charge injection
    10. 7.10 Mismatches
    11. 7.11 Summary and conclusions
  15. 8 M-phase Filtering and Duality
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Dual of an electrical circuit
      1. 8.2.1 Dual of a switch
    3. 8.3 Dual of M-phase filter
      1. 8.3.1 Differential implementation of M-phase filter and its dual
    4. 8.4 Dual of M-phase high-Q filter with complex baseband impedances
    5. 8.5 Summary and conclusions
  16. Appendix A
  17. References
  18. Index