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Integrating the IBM MQ Appliance into your IBM MQ Infrastructure

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication describes the IBM MQ Appliance M2000, an application connectivity option that combines secure, reliable IBM MQ messaging with the simplicity and low overall costs of a hardware appliance.

This book presents underlying concepts and practical advice for integrating the IBM MQ Appliance M2000 into an IBM MQ infrastructure. Therefore, it is aimed at enterprises that are considering a possible first use of IBM MQ and the IBM MQ Appliance M2000 and those that already identified the appliance as a logical addition to their messaging environment.

Details about new functionality and changes in approaches to application messaging are also described. The authors' goal is to help readers make informed design and implementation decisions so that the users can successfully integrate the IBM MQ Appliance M2000 into their environments.

A broad understanding of enterprise messaging is required to fully comprehend the details that are provided in this book. Readers are assumed to have at least some familiarity and experience with complimentary IBM messaging products.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. IBM Redbooks promotions
  4. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  5. Part 1 Overview
  6. Chapter 1. Introduction
    1. 1.1 IBM MQ Appliance M2000
      1. 1.1.1 Advantages of an appliance
      2. 1.1.2 Business use cases
    2. 1.2 Features and benefits
      1. 1.2.1 High availability
      2. 1.2.2 Easy administration
      3. 1.2.3 Appliance options and upgrades
      4. 1.2.4 Support for hardware and software
      5. 1.2.5 Security
    3. 1.3 About this book
      1. 1.3.1 Intended audience
      2. 1.3.2 Covered topics
      3. 1.3.3 Topics not covered
  7. Chapter 2. Business scenario overview
    1. 2.1 Current configuration
      1. 2.1.1 Queue manager cluster configuration
      2. 2.1.2 Application flow
    2. 2.2 Target configuration
      1. 2.2.1 New full repository queue managers
      2. 2.2.2 HA gateway
      3. 2.2.3 Central authentication and authorization
      4. 2.2.4 Adding non-HA queue managers to the cluster
      5. 2.2.5 Cluster configuration
      6. 2.2.6 Application flow
  8. Part 2 Using the IBM MQ Appliance
  9. Chapter 3. Planning
    1. 3.1 Number of appliances
    2. 3.2 Standards
      1. 3.2.1 Naming standards
      2. 3.2.2 Network interface standards
      3. 3.2.3 Interface name standards
      4. 3.2.4 Authentication and authorization standards
      5. 3.2.5 Logging standards
      6. 3.2.6 Coded Character Set ID standards
    3. 3.3 Location
    4. 3.4 Other equipment needed
      1. 3.4.1 Racks
      2. 3.4.2 Support servers
      3. 3.4.3 Cables
    5. 3.5 Installation prerequisites
    6. 3.6 Information needed before initializing the IBM MQ Appliance
    7. 3.7 Remote access to serial port
    8. 3.8 More information for complete initialization
  10. Chapter 4. Installing the IBM MQ Appliance
    1. 4.1 Rack choice
    2. 4.2 Power
    3. 4.3 Environment
  11. Chapter 5. Initial appliance configuration
    1. 5.1 Preparing a notebook to connect to the serial console port
    2. 5.2 Connecting the USB serial adapter cable
    3. 5.3 Running a terminal emulation application
      1. 5.3.1 Using a Windows system to connect
      2. 5.3.2 Using Mac OS X to connect
    4. 5.4 Logging in for the first time
    5. 5.5 Installation wizard
      1. 5.5.1 Running the installation wizard
      2. 5.5.2 Configuring the mgt0 network interface
      3. 5.5.3 Configuring Network Services
      4. 5.5.4 Configuring a unique system identifier
      5. 5.5.5 Configuring remote management access
      6. 5.5.6 Configuring a spare admin account
      7. 5.5.7 Saving the configuration
    6. 5.6 Accepting the appliance license terms and conditions
      1. 5.6.1 Connecting to the appliance web UI with a browser
      2. 5.6.2 Logging in and accepting the license agreement
    7. 5.7 Implementing IPMI
      1. 5.7.1 Creating IPMI objects
      2. 5.7.2 IPMI usage examples
    8. 5.8 Next steps
  12. Chapter 6. Appliance administration
    1. 6.1 IBM MQ Appliance user model
      1. 6.1.1 Appliance administrators
      2. 6.1.2 IBM MQ users
    2. 6.2 CLI administration
    3. 6.3 IBM MQ Appliance Web UI administration
      1. 6.3.1 Securing the appliance web UI
      2. 6.3.2 Managing the IBM MQ Console
    4. 6.4 Network configuration
      1. 6.4.1 Configure network interfaces
      2. 6.4.2 Configuring names for interfaces
      3. 6.4.3 External services used by the IBM MQ Appliance
      4. 6.4.4 Appliance hosted Network Services
    5. 6.5 Appliance file system
    6. 6.6 Firmware upgrades
  13. Chapter 7. Creating queue managers
    1. 7.1 Preparing to create queue managers
      1. 7.1.1 User and group configuration
      2. 7.1.2 Log file size
      3. 7.1.3 Queue file size
      4. 7.1.4 File system size
    2. 7.2 Using the command line to create queue managers
      1. 7.2.1 Default values
    3. 7.3 Using the IBM MQ Console to create queue managers
    4. 7.4 Queue manager security
      1. 7.4.1 LDAP considerations
      2. 7.4.2 Connecting the queue manager to the LDAP
    5. 7.5 Customizing the queue manager
      1. 7.5.1 Limit max channels
      2. 7.5.2 Configuring the number of logs
      3. 7.5.3 Configuring channel behavior
      4. 7.5.4 Configuring TLS certificate checking
      5. 7.5.5 Binding the listener to the data interface
  14. Chapter 8. IBM MQ object security
    1. 8.1 Queue manager security
    2. 8.2 Object security
      1. 8.2.1 Enable remote administration
      2. 8.2.2 Connecting IBM MQ Explorer
      3. 8.2.3 Connecting runmqsc client
      4. 8.2.4 Enabling limited administration rights
      5. 8.2.5 Granting security rights to users
    3. 8.3 Summary
  15. Chapter 9. IBM MQ channel security
    1. 9.1 Security policy
    2. 9.2 SSL and TLS
    3. 9.3 Replacing exits
      1. 9.3.1 Security exits
      2. 9.3.2 Channel auto-definition exits
      3. 9.3.3 Other exits
    4. 9.4 User Identity changes
    5. 9.5 Purpose of MCAUSERs
    6. 9.6 Authenticating channel partners
      1. 9.6.1 Message channels
      2. 9.6.2 MQI channels
    7. 9.7 Assigning MCAUSERs on the IBM MQ Appliance
      1. 9.7.1 MCAUSER field on the channel definition
      2. 9.7.2 MCAUSER attribute of a channel authentication record
      3. 9.7.3 MCAUSER assigned by using ADOPTCTX
      4. 9.7.4 Granting rights to channel MCA users
      5. 9.7.5 Creating and managing MCA users
    8. 9.8 Summary
  16. Chapter 10. High availability
    1. 10.1 Disaster recovery and high availability
    2. 10.2 Historical IBM MQ HA
    3. 10.3 HA groups
    4. 10.4 Preparing for HA
    5. 10.5 Creating an HA group
    6. 10.6 Creating an HA queue manager
    7. 10.7 Setting the preferred appliance for a queue manager
    8. 10.8 Suspending and resuming an appliance
    9. 10.9 Applying a fix pack to an HA group
    10. 10.10 HA scenario
      1. 10.10.1 Defining a cluster receiver channel
      2. 10.10.2 Creating a host alias for a listener
      3. 10.10.3 Defining a listener
  17. Chapter 11. Application changes
    1. 11.1 Just another queue manager
    2. 11.2 Client scenarios
      1. 11.2.1 Synchronous requester application
      2. 11.2.2 Server application (query only)
      3. 11.2.3 Server application (reliable update)
    3. 11.3 Summary
  18. Chapter 12. Support for the IBM MQ Appliance
    1. 12.1 Scope of appliance support
      1. 12.1.1 Removing user exits
    2. 12.2 Fix process
      1. 12.2.1 Software problem
      2. 12.2.2 Hardware problem
    3. 12.3 Support for the IBM MQ installation on the appliance
      1. 12.3.1 New tools for basic troubleshooting
      2. 12.3.2 Differences in familiar commands and familiar file locations
      3. 12.3.3 Location and names of IBM MQ error logs on the IBM MQ Appliance
    4. 12.4 Appliance support
      1. 12.4.1 Appliance error logs
      2. 12.4.2 Copy command
    5. 12.5 Example support scenario
  19. Part 3 Appendixes
  20. Appendix A. IBM MQ cryptographic changes
    1. Comparison of commands
    2. Examples of using the new keystore commands
  21. Appendix B. Transcript of IBM MQ Appliance firmware upgrade
  22. Appendix C. Transcript of appliance initialization
  23. Appendix D. Commands to enable an LDAP authenticated administrator
  24. Related publications
  25. Back cover