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Integrating Cognitive Architectures into Virtual Character Design

Book Description

Cognitive architectures represent an umbrella term to describe ways in which the flow of thought can be engineered towards cerebral and behavioral outcomes. Cognitive Architectures are meant to provide top-down guidance, a knowledge base, interactive heuristics and concrete or fuzzy policies for which the virtual character can utilize for intelligent interaction with his/her/its situated virtual environment. Integrating Cognitive Architectures into Virtual Character Design presents emerging research on virtual character artificial intelligence systems and procedures and the integration of cognitive architectures. Emphasizing innovative methodologies for intelligent virtual character integration and design, this publication is an ideal reference source for graduate-level students, researchers, and professionals in the fields of artificial intelligence, gaming, and computer science.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Book Series
    1. Mission
    2. Coverage
  5. Editorial Advisory Board
  6. List of Reviewers
  7. Foreword
  8. Preface
    1. INTRODUCTION TO THE SUBJECT AREA
    2. SYNOPSIS
    3. OVERALL OBJECTIVES AND MISSION OF THIS BOOK
    4. INTENDED AUDIENCE
    5. CHAPTER RECOMMENDATIONS
    6. REFERENCES
  9. Acknowledgment
  10. Chapter 1: On Vision-Based Human-Centric Virtual Character Design
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. VISION BASED EVOLUTION OF A VIRTUAL CHARACTER
    5. SOLUTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
    6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
  11. Chapter 2: Integrating ACT-R Cognitive Models with the Unity Game Engine
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. THE ACT-R COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE
    4. UNITY GAME ENGINE
    5. INTEGRATING ACT-R WITH UNITY
    6. CASE STUDY: MAZE NAVIGATION USING A VIRTUAL ROBOT
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    9. REFERENCES
    10. ENDNOTES
  12. Chapter 3: A Graphical Tool for the Creation of Behaviors in Virtual Worlds
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND AND RELATED WORK
    4. THE AUTHORING PROCESS AS A MENTAL ACTIVITY
    5. SECOND MIND: A SYSTEM FOR BEHAVIOR AUTHORING
    6. CONCLUSION AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
  13. Chapter 4: Learned Behavior
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. DESIGNING FOR BELIEVABILITY
    5. A PROTOTYPE SYSTEM
    6. CASE STUDIES
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  14. Chapter 5: Personality-Based Cognitive Design of Characters in Virtual Environments
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. 1 INTRODUCTION
    3. 2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND ON PERSONALITY
    4. 3 COMPUTATIONAL BACKGROUND ON COGNITION AND PERSONALITY-EXPRESSIVE BEHAVIOUR
    5. 4 THE PROPOSED PERSONALITY-BASED COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE
    6. 5 FUTURE WORK AND CONCLUSION
    7. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    8. REFERENCES
  15. Chapter 6: The Contemporary Craft of Creating Characters Meets Today's Cognitive Architectures
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. WHAT IS EXPRESSIVITY?
    4. DOUBLE-MINDED MAN, AND EXPRESSIVITY CHALLENGES THEREFROM
    5. BASIC DEMANDS OF MOVIE OUTLINE 3
    6. HARRIET, JOSEPH, AND A PAIR OF EXPRESSIVITY CHALLENGES
    7. THE “NO WAY” CATEGORY AND THE EXPRESSIVITY CHALLENGES
    8. THE “MAYBE” CATEGORY, ACT-R, AND THE EXPRESSIVITY CHALLENGES
    9. CLARION AND THE EXPRESSIVITY CHALLENGES
    10. NACS: THE NON-ACTION-CENTERED SUBSYSTEM
    11. THE EXPRESSIVITY OF CLARION
    12. FOL-LEVEL EXPRESSIVITY IN CLARION
    13. CHALLENGES (1) AND (2) MET
    14. CONCERNS AND OBJECTIONS; REPLIES
    15. CONCLUSION
    16. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    17. REFERENCES
    18. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    19. ENDNOTES
  16. Chapter 7: Virtual Soar-Agent Implementations
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. CAVEAT: VIRTUAL AGENTS MIGHT NOT EVEN REQUIRE COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURES
    4. COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURES
    5. CONCLUSION
    6. REFERENCES
    7. ADDITIONAL READING
    8. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
    9. ENDNOTES
  17. Chapter 8: Towards Truly Autonomous Synthetic Characters with the Sigma Cognitive Architecture
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. 1. INTRODUCTION
    3. 2. TRULY AUTONOMOUS CHARACTERS
    4. 3. SIGMA
    5. 4. THE IMMERSIVE NAVAL OFFICER TRAINING SYSTEM (INOTS)
    6. 5. PHYSICAL SECURITY SYSTEM
    7. 6. CONCLUSION
    8. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
    9. REFERENCES
    10. ENDNOTE
  18. Chapter 9: A Universal Architecture for Migrating Cognitive Agents
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. UNIVERSAL MIGRATING COGNITIVE AGENT
    5. EVALUATION AND EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS
    6. FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  19. Chapter 10: Game AGI beyond Characters
    1. ABSTRACT
    2. INTRODUCTION
    3. BACKGROUND
    4. PLAYER EXPERIENCE MODELING AND MANAGEMENT
    5. AI-BASED GAMES
    6. GAME CREATION
    7. CONCLUSION
    8. REFERENCES
    9. KEY TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
  20. Conclusion
    1. OVERVIEW
    2. COGNITION WITHOUT ARCHITECTURES: THE SEMANTIC AMBIGUITY BETWEEN COGNITIVE MODELS AND ARCHITECTURES
    3. ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURES
    4. CHALLENGES WITH INTEGRATING ESTABLISHED ARCHITECTURES
    5. META AND HYBRID COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURES
    6. REFERENCES
  21. Compilation of References
  22. About the Contributors