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Information Theory

Book Description

During the last decade we have witnessed rapid developments of computer networks and Internet technologies along with dramatic improvements in the processing power of personal computers. These developments make Interactive Distance Education a reality. By designing and deploying distributed and collaborative applications running on computers disseminated over the Internet, distance educators can reach remote learners, overcoming the time and distance constraints. Besides the necessary theoretical base provided by lectures and written materials, hands-on experience provided by physical laboratories is a vital part for engineering education. It helps engineering students become effective professionals. Such instruction not only provides the students with the knowledge of the physical equipment but also adds the important dimension of group work and collaboration. However, laboratories are expensive to setup, to maintain and provide long hours of daily staffing. Due to budget limitations, many universities and colleges can provide only limited access to such physical equipment. Therefore, it is imperative to enable remote access to a physical laboratory, either as part of an on-site or distance learning course.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Halftitle
  3. Title
  4. Copyright
  5. Series Page
  6. ABSTRACT
  7. CONTENTS
  8. LIST OF FIGURES
  9. LIST OF TABLES
  10. PREFACE
  11. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  12. 1. INFORMATION THEORY
    1. 1.1 Information Measurement
    2. 1.2 Requirements for an Information Metric
  13. 2. SOURCES OF INFORMATION
    1. 2.1 Source Coding
    2. 2.2 Extension of a Memoryless Discrete Source
    3. 2.3 Prefix Codes
    4. 2.4 The Information Unit
  14. 3. SOURCE CODING
    1. 3.1 Types of Source Codes
    2. 3.2 Construction of Instantaneous Codes
    3. 3.3 Kraft Inequality
    4. 3.4 Huffman Code
  15. 4. INFORMATION TRANSMISSION
    1. 4.1 The Concept of Information Theory
    2. 4.2 Joint Information Measurement
    3. 4.3 Conditional Entropy
    4. 4.4 Model for a Communication Channel
    5. 4.5 Noiseless Channel
    6. 4.6 Channel with Independent Output and Input
    7. 4.7 Relations Between the Entropies
    8. 4.8 Mutual Information
    9. 4.9 Channel Capacity
  16. 5. MULTIPLE ACCESS SYSTEMS
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 The Gaussian Multiple Access Channel
    3. 5.3 The Gaussian Channel with Rayleigh Fading
    4. 5.4 The Noncooperative Multiple Access Channel
    5. 5.5 Multiple Access in a Dynamic Environment
    6. 5.6 Analysis of the capacity for a Markovian Multiple Access Channel
  17. 6. CODE DIVISION MULTIPLE ACCESS
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Fundamentals of Spread Spectrum Signals
    3. 6.3 Performance Analysis of CDMA Systems
    4. 6.4 Sequence Design
  18. 7. THE CAPACITY OF A CDMA SYSTEM
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 Analysis of a CDMA System with a Fixed Number of Users and Small SNR
    3. 7.3 CDMA System with a Fixed Number of Users and High
    4. 7.4 A Tight Bound on the Capacity of a CDMA System
  19. 8. THEORETICAL CRYPTOGRAPHY
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Cryptographic Aspects of Computer Networks
    3. 8.3 Principles of Cryptography
    4. 8.4 Information Theoretical Aspects of Cryptography
    5. 8.5 Mutual Information for Cryptosystems
  20. APPENDIX A PROBABILITY THEORY
    1. A.1 Set Theory and Measure
    2. A.2 Basic Probability Theory
    3. A.3 Random Variables
  21. REFERENCES
  22. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
  23. INDEX
  24. ADPAGE
  25. BACKCOVER