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Information Space

Book Description

In this book the author lays the foundations for a new political economy of information. The information space, or I-Space is the conceptual framework in which organizations, institutions and cultures are being transformed by new information and communication technologies. In the penultimate chapter, the I-Space’s usefulness as an explanatory framework is illustrated with an application: a case study of China’s modernization. Information Space proposes a radical shift in the way that we approach the emerging information age and the implications it holds for societies, organizations and individuals.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title Page
  4. Copyright Page
  5. Title Page
  6. Orginal Copyright Page
  7. Table of Contents
  8. List of figures
  9. List of tables
  10. Foreword
  11. Acknowledgements
  12. Introduction
    1. 0.1 The Market for Air
    2. 0.2 Key Issues Addressed
    3. 0.3 Plan of the Book
  13. 1 Orienting Thoughts on Information
    1. 1.1 The Indeterminate Nature of Information
    2. 1.2 Newtonian Economics
    3. 1.3 The Need for a Post-Newtonian Economics
    4. 1.4 In Quest of a ‘Gestalt Switch’
    5. 1.5 The Power of the Information Perspective
  14. 2 The Structuring of Information
    1. 2.1 Perceiving as Coding
    2. 2.2 Conceiving as Abstraction
    3. 2.3 The E-space
    4. 2.4 Moving in the E-Space: Learning
    5. 2.5 Mapping the Individual in the E-Space: Personality factors
    6. 2.6 Conclusion
  15. 3 The Sharing of Information
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Communicating
    3. 3.3 Communicating Meaningfully: the Sharing of Contexts
    4. 3.4 Scanning and Diffusion as Social Processes
    5. 3.5 The Reach of Abstraction
    6. 3.6 The Utility Space
    7. 3.7 Relativism
    8. 3.8 The Social Distribution of Power
    9. 3.9 Institutions
    10. 3.10 The Entropy of Social Processes
    11. 3.11 The C-Space
    12. 3.12 Information Strategies
    13. 3.13 Summary and Conclusion
  16. 4 Dynamic Behaviour: the Social Learning Cycle
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 Codification
    3. 4.3 Abstraction
    4. 4.4 Diffusion
    5. 4.5 Knowledge Cycles
    6. 4.6 Scanning
    7. 4.7 Problem-Solving
    8. 4.8 Abstraction
    9. 4.9 Diffusion
    10. 4.10 Absorption
    11. 4.11 Impacting
    12. 4.12 Driving the Cycle
    13. 4.13 Strategic Action in the Knowledge Cycle
    14. 4.14 Conclusion
  17. 5 Institutions
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Types of Transactions
    3. 5.3 Markets
    4. 5.4 Bureaucracies
    5. 5.5 Clans
    6. 5.6 Fiefs
    7. 5.7 Transactional Evolution
    8. 5.8 Institutionalization
    9. 5.9 Governance
    10. 5.10 Conclusion
  18. 6 Culture as Economizing
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Approaches to Culture
    3. 6.3 Culture and the Social Learning Cycle
    4. 6.4 Cultural Convergence: A Reinterpretation
    5. 6.5 Culture as Institutional Pattern
    6. 6.6 The Problem of Governance in Cultural Perspective
    7. 6.7 Conclusion
  19. 7 Case Study – Socialist Transformations
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 China’s Modernization
    3. 7.3 Interpretation
    4. 7.4 Japan’s Modernization
    5. 7.5 Interpretation
    6. 7.6 Post-communism in Eastern Europe
    7. 7.7 Eastern Europe: An Interpretation
    8. 7.8 Conclusion
  20. 8 Conclusion
    1. 8.1 The Limits to Neoclassical Growth
    2. 8.2 Recapitulation
    3. 8.3 N- and S-Learning
    4. 8.4 A Theory for the Age of Information
    5. 8.5 Extensions
  21. Notes
  22. Bibliography
  23. Index