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Industrial Process Automation Systems

Book Description

An applied guide to the design and implementation of process automation systems, written by an experienced practitioner from a leading technology company.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. Chapter 1: Industrial automation
    1. Abstract
    2. 1.1. Introduction
    3. 1.2. Innovators
    4. 1.3. Industrial revolutions
    5. 1.4. Evolution of automation from needs perspectives
    6. 1.5. Evolution of automation from technology perspectives
    7. 1.6. Challenges three decades back
    8. 1.7. Current challenges
    9. 1.8. Technology trends
    10. 1.9. Device connectivity
    11. 1.10. Automation system controllers
    12. 1.11. The generic duties of an automation system in hierarchical form
    13. 1.12. Functional requirements of an integrated information and automation systems: A generic list
    14. 1.13. Conceptual/functional topology of an automation system
  6. Chapter 2: The programmable logic controller
    1. Abstract
    2. 2.1. Introduction to the programmable logic controller
    3. 2.2. Hardware
    4. 2.3. Internal architecture
    5. 2.4. I/O devices
    6. 2.5. I/O processing
    7. 2.6. Ladder and function block programming
    8. 2.7. Function blocks
    9. 2.8. IL, SFC, and ST programming methods
  7. Chapter 3: Distributed control system
    1. Abstract
    2. 3.1. Introduction
    3. 3.2. Evolution of traditional control systems
    4. 3.3. Distributed control systems
    5. 3.4. Functional components of DCS
    6. 3.5. Diagnostics in IOs
    7. 3.6. Controllers
    8. 3.7. Workstations
    9. 3.8. Functional Features of DCS
  8. Chapter 4: Batch automation systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 4.1. Introduction
  9. Chapter 5: Functional safety and safety instrumented systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 5.1. Functional safety: an introduction
    3. 5.2. What is functional safety?
    4. 5.3. Safety functions and safety-related systems
    5. 5.4. Example of functional safety
    6. 5.5. Legislation and standards
    7. 5.6. IEC 61508/IEC 61511: an introduction
    8. 5.7. Scope of the standard
    9. 5.8. The overall safety life cycle (SLS)
    10. 5.9. Risk and its analysis and reduction
    11. 5.10. Safety requirements and safety functions
    12. 5.11. Safety integrity levels (SIL)
    13. 5.12. Functional safety management
    14. 5.13. Layers of protection
    15. 5.14. Risk analysis techniques
    16. 5.15. Safety requirement specifications
    17. 5.16. General requirements
    18. 5.17. Response time
    19. 5.18. SIF specification
    20. 5.19. Operator interfaces (HMI)
    21. 5.20. Safety instrumented systems
    22. 5.21. Reliability and diagnostics
    23. 5.22. SIS voting principles and methods
    24. 5.23. SIS SIL level calculation tools
    25. 5.24. SIS communication protocols and field-buses
    26. 5.25. FF-SIS: foundation Fieldbus for safety instrumented systems
    27. 5.26. PROFISafe
    28. 5.27. PROFIsafe protocol
    29. 5.28. Black Channel principle
    30. 5.29. Integrated Safety data communications
    31. 5.30. Selection of safety instrumented system
  10. Chapter 6: Fire and gas detection system
    1. Abstract
    2. 6.1. Introduction to the fire and gas (F&G) detection system
    3. 6.2. Understanding industry safety performance standards
    4. 6.3. Critical components
    5. 6.4. F&G detectors
    6. 6.5. F&G network architecture
    7. 6.6. Integrated approach for F&G
    8. 6.7. Conclusion
  11. Chapter 7: SCADA systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 7.1. Overview of SCADA systems
    3. 7.2. Minicomputers and microprocessors
    4. 7.3. Remote terminal units
    5. 7.4. Communication technologies
    6. 7.5. Program development tools
    7. 7.6. Operator interface
  12. Chapter 8: Programmable automation controller
    1. Abstract
    2. 8.1. Modern industrial application
  13. Chapter 9: Serial communications
    1. Abstract
    2. 9.1. RS232 overview
    3. 9.2. RS232 signal information
    4. 9.3. Limitations of RS232 applications
    5. 9.4. Overview of EIA-485
    6. 9.5. The difference between RS232/RS485/RS422
    7. 9.6. Modbus serial communications
    8. 9.7. Modbus map
    9. 9.8. Error checking methods
    10. 9.9. Modbus exception codes
  14. Chapter 10: Industrial networks
    1. Abstract
    2. 10.1. Introduction to industrial networks
    3. 10.2. The OSI network model
    4. 10.3. TCP/IP
  15. Chapter 11: HART communication
    1. Abstract
    2. 11.1. Introduction
    3. 11.2. Technology
    4. 11.3. HART technology
    5. 11.4. Application environment
  16. Chapter 12: PROFIBUS communication
    1. Abstract
    2. 12.1. Overview
    3. 12.2. Supported topology
    4. 12.3. Data exchange
    5. 12.4. Fail-safe operation
    6. Acknowledgments
  17. Chapter 13: Foundation fieldbus communication
    1. Abstract
    2. 13.1. Fieldbus technology
  18. Chapter 14: Wireless communication
    1. Abstract
    2. 14.1. Introduction
    3. 14.2. Basic concepts of industrial wireless communication
    4. 14.3. ISA100 standard
    5. 14.4. Networks
    6. 14.5. Network configurations
    7. 14.6. Gateway, system manager, and security manager
    8. 14.7. Applications of wireless instrumentation
    9. 14.8. Designing and engineering a wireless system
  19. Chapter 15: OPC communications
    1. Abstract
    2. 15.1. Introduction
  20. Chapter 16: Asset management systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 16.1. Definition of an asset
    3. 16.2. Asset management system
    4. 16.3. Key goal of asset management system
    5. 16.4. Fault models
    6. 16.5. Calculation model
    7. 16.6. Maintaining work processes
    8. 16.7. Unneeded trips to the field – avoided through remote diagnostics
    9. 16.8. Life cycle work processes
    10. 16.9. Intelligent field devices – data flow
    11. 16.10. Integrated asset management
    12. 16.11. Use of the tools
    13. 16.12. Instrument asset management systems – architecture/subsystems
    14. 16.13. Smart field devices
    15. 16.14. Asset management system: role-based diagnostics
    16. 16.15. Device rendering technologies
    17. 16.16. Limitations of DD technology
    18. 16.17. Enhanced device description language
    19. 16.18. FDT/DTM
    20. 16.19. The DTM
    21. 16.20. Key benefits to the users
  21. Chapter 17: Calibration management systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 17.1. Introduction
    3. 17.2. Need for calibration
    4. 17.3. Traceability
    5. 17.4. Calibration standards
    6. 17.5. Calibration concepts
    7. 17.6. Documentation
    8. 17.7. Calibration of transmitters
    9. 17.8. Calibrating a conventional instrument
    10. 17.9. Calibrating a HART instrument
    11. 17.10. Calibrating fieldbus transmitters
    12. 17.11. Calibration Management System
    13. 17.12. Calibration Software
    14. 17.13. Benefits of using calibration management system
    15. 17.14. Business benefits
  22. Chapter 18: System maintenance
    1. Abstract
    2. 18.1. Overview
    3. 18.2. Distributed control system maintenance
    4. 18.3. Maintenance software
    5. 18.4. Maintenance program implementation and management
    6. 18.5. Software and network maintenance
    7. 18.6. Computer operating environment
    8. 18.7. Network maintenance
  23. Chapter 19: Advanced process control systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 19.1. Introduction and need for advanced process control (APC)
    3. 19.2. History of process control
    4. 19.3. Advanced process control
    5. 19.4. Advantages of APC
    6. 19.5. Architecture and technologies
  24. Chapter 20: Training system
    1. Abstract
    2. 20.1. Introduction to process modeling
    3. 20.2. Training Systems
    4. 20.3. Components of training simulators system
    5. 20.4. Architecture of a Typical training simulators
  25. Chapter 21: Alarm management systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 21.1. Introduction
    3. 21.2. Conventional and advanced alarm systems
  26. Chapter 22: Database systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 22.1. Historian database
  27. Chapter 23: Manufacturing execution systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 23.1. Introduction
  28. Chapter 24: Cyber security in industrial automation
    1. Abstract
    2. 24.1. Plant Control Network
    3. 24.2. Cyber attacks
    4. 24.3. Understanding common PCS vulnerabilities
    5. 24.4. Common PCS software security weaknesses
    6. 24.5. Standards
  29. Chapter 25: Mobile and video systems
    1. Abstract
    2. 25.1. Introduction
    3. 25.2. Mobile process monitoring console
    4. 25.3. Key benefits of wireless process mobile console
    5. 25.4. Handheld mobile device solutions
    6. 25.5. Some of the major benefits of field-based mobility solutions
    7. 25.6. Mobile device based solutions
    8. 25.7. Video system analytics
    9. 25.8. Regions of interest
    10. 25.9. Minimum object size
    11. 25.10. Video system camera server
    12. 25.11. DCS
    13. 25.12. Operator console
    14. 25.13. Video system client
  30. Index