You are previewing IMS Integration and Connectivity Across the Enterprise.
O'Reilly logo
IMS Integration and Connectivity Across the Enterprise

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication gives a broad understanding of IBM IMS™ integration and connectivity solutions to access applications and data stores across your enterprise architecture.

As an application developer, architect, systems integrator, or systems programmer, there is important information that is available in this book that pertains to your responsibilities to continue to include the proven performance, data integrity, and workload distribution that is available from IMS in to selected projects that are related to your entire enterprise.

This book updates and adds to the information in the following IBM Redbooks publications:

  • IMS e-business Connectors: A Guide to IMS Connectivity, SG24-6514

  • IMS Connectivity in an On Demand Environment: A Practical Guide to IMS Connectivity, SG24-6794

  • Powering SOA Solutions with IMS, SG24-7662

  • IBM IMS Version 12 Technical Overview, SG24-7972

  • IMS 12: The IMS Catalog, REDP-4812

  • Rethink Your Mainframe Applications: Reasons and Approaches for Extension, Transformation, and Growth, REDP-4938

Please note that the additional material referenced in the text is not available from IBM.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Figures
  3. Tables
  4. Examples
  5. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  6. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  7. Part 1 IBM IMS architecture and application technology fundamentals
  8. Chapter 1. IIBM IMS architectural overview
    1. 1.1 Choosing the best IMS connectivity solution set
      1. 1.1.1 Considerations that are related to your choice of service
  9. Chapter 2. IBM IMS Connect
    1. 2.1 IMS Connect overview
    2. 2.2 Commit processing message flows
      1. 2.2.1 Commit-then-send (commit mode 0) flow
      2. 2.2.2 Send-then-commit message (commit mode 1) flows
      3. 2.2.3 Send-then-commit (sync level=none)
      4. 2.2.4 Send-then-commit (sync level=confirm)
      5. 2.2.5 Send-then-commit (sync level=sync point)
      6. 2.2.6 Persistent sockets
    3. 2.3 Installing IMS Connect
    4. 2.4 IMS Connect implementation and configuration process
      1. 2.4.1 Creating an IMS Connect start procedure
      2. 2.4.2 Authorizing IMS Connect and BPE to the APF
      3. 2.4.3 Updating the program properties table
      4. 2.4.4 Enabling Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPV6) for IMS Connect
      5. 2.4.5 Defining the IMS Connect Base Primitive Environment configuration
      6. 2.4.6 Base IMS Connect configuration statement parameters
      7. 2.4.7 Defining a single IMS Connect configuration member
      8. 2.4.8 Defining multiple IMS Connect configuration members
      9. 2.4.9 IMS Connect configuration statement for IMS DB support
      10. 2.4.10 Defining IMS Connect security
      11. 2.4.11 Installing the default user exits into an IMS Connect resource library
    5. 2.5 IMS Connect configuration enhancements
      1. 2.5.1 IMS Version 10: ACEE aging value support
      2. 2.5.2 IMS Version 10: Send-then-commit (CM1) ACK timeout control
      3. 2.5.3 IMS Version 10: Message flood control
      4. 2.5.4 IMS Version 10: Resume Tpipe port affinity
      5. 2.5.5 IMS Version 11: CM0 ACK timeout support
      6. 2.5.6 IMS Version 11: Super member support at a data store level
      7. 2.5.7 IMS Version 13: Configuring the TCP/IP maximum backlog queue size
    6. 2.6 IMS Connect user exits
    7. 2.7 IMS Connect user exit enhancements
      1. 2.7.1 IMS Version 11: User message exit cleanup
      2. 2.7.2 IMS Version 11: Modifying formats of incoming and outgoing messages
      3. 2.7.3 IMS Version 11: HWSEXPRM parameter list expansion
      4. 2.7.4 IMS Version 12: Load modules packaging for exits
    8. 2.8 IMS Connect high availability facilities
      1. 2.8.1 IMS Connect workload balancing and failover
    9. 2.9 IMS Connect high availability enhancements
      1. 2.9.1 IMS Version 11: TCP/IP auto reconnect
      2. 2.9.2 IMS Version 13: Reporting IMS Connect health to the Workload Manager
    10. 2.10 IMS Connect operations and command support
      1. 2.10.1 IMS Connect support for IMSplex and the IMS Control Center
      2. 2.10.2 IMS Connect REPLY commands
      3. 2.10.3 IMS Connect MODIFY commands
      4. 2.10.4 IMS command support for IMS Connect and OTMA
    11. 2.11 IMS Connect operations and command enhancements
      1. 2.11.1 IMS Version 11: Enhanced IMS Connect commands
      2. 2.11.2 IMS Version 11: Enforcement of the single port requirement for SSL sockets
      3. 2.11.3 IMS Version 12: IMS Connect type-2 SPOC commands
      4. 2.11.4 IMS Version 12: Partial read status display and control
      5. 2.11.5 IMS Version 13: IMS Connect command enhancements
      6. 2.11.6 IMS Version 13: Increasing the maximum number of XML converters
      7. 2.11.7 IMS Version 13: Auto-restarting the Language Environment
    12. 2.12 Accessibility through IMS Connect
    13. 2.13 IMS Connect accessibility enhancements
      1. 2.13.1 IMS Version 11: Integrated IMS Connect enhancements for IMS DB
      2. 2.13.2 IMS to IMS TCP/IP connectivity
      3. 2.13.3 IMS Version 12: Multiple Systems Coupling using TCP/IP
      4. 2.13.4 IMS Version 13: ISC using TCP/IP protocols
    14. 2.14 IMS Connect client programming interfaces
    15. 2.15 IMS Connect Client programming interface enhancements
      1. 2.15.1 IMS Version 10: Alternative client ID support
      2. 2.15.2 IMS Version 10: Send-only with acknowledgement protocol
      3. 2.15.3 Cancel Client ID support
    16. 2.16 IMS Connect security
      1. 2.16.1 IMS Connect secure access to IMS
      2. 2.16.2 Connecting IMS Connect to OTMA
      3. 2.16.3 User verification
      4. 2.16.4 IMS Connect SSL connections
    17. 2.17 IMS Connect security enhancements
      1. 2.17.1 IMS Version 10: Client password change request
      2. 2.17.2 IMS Version 12: RACF return codes passed back to client
      3. 2.17.3 IMS Version 12 / 13: RACF ENF support for cached RACF user IDs
    18. 2.18 IMS Connect scalability and performance
      1. 2.18.1 IMS Connect performance parameters
      2. 2.18.2 TCP/IP performance parameters
    19. 2.19 IMS Connect scalability and performance enhancements
      1. 2.19.1 IMS Version 10: The NODELAY parameter
      2. 2.19.2 IMS Version 11: IMS Connect performance enhancement
      3. 2.19.3 IMS Version 12: RACF user ID caching
      4. 2.19.4 IMS Version 13: Usage of the internal CPOOL storage macro
    20. 2.20 IMS Connect diagnostic tests
    21. 2.21 IMS Connect diagnostic enhancements
      1. 2.21.1 IMS Version 10 and 11: HWSTECL0 event record enhancements
      2. 2.21.2 IMS Version 11: Usage of the BPE External Trace facility
      3. 2.21.3 IMS Version 11: Additional information in message HWSP1410W
      4. 2.21.4 IMS Version 11: Warning messages and early detection of maximum sockets
      5. 2.21.5 IMS Version 12: IMS Connect Recorder Trace
      6. 2.21.6 IMS Version 13: Expanded Recorder trace records
  10. Chapter 3. IBM IMS Connect Extensions for z/OS
    1. 3.1 Overview
      1. 3.1.1 Event collection
      2. 3.1.2 Routing
      3. 3.1.3 Operational controls
    2. 3.2 Scenarios
      1. 3.2.1 Incorrect message length
      2. 3.2.2 Identifying IMS problems with TCP/IP information
      3. 3.2.3 Client fails to ACK
      4. 3.2.4 OTMA timeouts
      5. 3.2.5 Duplicate clients
      6. 3.2.6 Open database issues
      7. 3.2.7 Synchronous callout issues
      8. 3.2.8 OTMA flood condition
    3. 3.3 Scheduled and unscheduled outages
      1. 3.3.1 Minimizing disruptions from outages
      2. 3.3.2 Session rebalancing
      3. 3.3.3 Centrally managing client options
    4. 3.4 Application development considerations
  11. Chapter 4. Open Transaction Manager Access
    1. 4.1 OTMA clients
      1. 4.1.1 IMS Connect is an OTMA Client for TCP/IP
      2. 4.1.2 IBM WebSphere MQ on z/OS as an IMS OTMA Client
      3. 4.1.3 DB2 stored procedures include an OTMA Client: DSNAIMS
      4. 4.1.4 OTMA callable interface
    2. 4.2 OTMA activation, operations, and command support
    3. 4.3 OTMA activation, operations, and command support enhancements
      1. 4.3.1 IMS Version 10: Message flood condition notification
      2. 4.3.2 IMS Version 10: OTMA processing during IMS restart
      3. 4.3.3 IMS Version 10: /DIS TMEMBER Tpipe command enhanced
      4. 4.3.4 IMS Version 10: CM1 timeout controls
      5. 4.3.5 IMS Version 11: Timeout capability for commit-then-send messages
      6. 4.3.6 IMS Version 11: Enhanced resource monitoring
      7. 4.3.7 IMS Version 11: OTMA type-2 commands
      8. 4.3.8 IMS Version 13: /DISPLAY TMEMBER Tpipe command enhanced
      9. 4.3.9 IMS Version 13: OTMA global flood control enhancement
      10. 4.3.10 OTMA global flood control demonstration
      11. 4.3.11 IMS Version 13: OTMA MAXTP enhancements
      12. 4.3.12 IMS Version 13: MAXTP enhancement for the SQ environment
      13. 4.3.13 IMS Version 13: Enhancements to MAXTP support
      14. 4.3.14 IMS Version 13: OTMA messages sent to both the MTO and WTO
    4. 4.4 OTMA programming interfaces
    5. 4.5 OTMA programming enhancements
      1. 4.5.1 IMS Version 11: SQ ALTPCB back-end support
      2. 4.5.2 IMS Version 11: Input message transaction expiration timeout
      3. 4.5.3 IMS Version 12: Message DFS2082I for CM0
      4. 4.5.4 IMS Version 13: Synchronous Callout SendOnly Ack
      5. 4.5.5 IMS Version 13: OTMA CI enhanced async support
    6. 4.6 OTMA security
      1. 4.6.1 Client bids to connect
      2. 4.6.2 Processing an input message from the client
      3. 4.6.3 Resuming transaction pipe security
      4. 4.6.4 OTMA callable interface security
      5. 4.6.5 IMS OTMA callout security
    7. 4.7 OTMA security enhancements
      1. 4.7.1 IMS Version 10: RESUME Tpipe security
      2. 4.7.2 IMS Version 10: OTMA instance-specific security levels
      3. 4.7.3 IMS Version 12: OTMA ACEE reduction for multiple OTMA clients
    8. 4.8 OTMA exit and descriptor usage
      1. 4.8.1 OTMA Destination Resolution user exit (OTMAYPRX)
      2. 4.8.2 OTMA Input/Output Edit user exit (OTMAIOED)
      3. 4.8.3 OTMA User Data Formatting exit routine (DFSYDRU0)
      4. 4.8.4 OTMA Resume Tpipe Security user exit (OTMARTUX)
      5. 4.8.5 OTMA descriptors
    9. 4.9 OTMA exit and descriptor enhancements
      1. 4.9.1 IMS Version 10: OTMA Destination Routing Descriptors
      2. 4.9.2 IMS Version 13: DFSYPRX0 and DFSYDRU0 exits override the OTMA destination descriptor
      3. 4.9.3 IMS Version 13: WebSphere MQ descriptors
    10. 4.10 OTMA scalability and performance
      1. 4.10.1 Other general OTMA performance items
    11. 4.11 OTMA scalability and performance enhancements
      1. 4.11.1 IMS Version 10: Automatic removal of Tpipes
      2. 4.11.2 IMS Version 10: Dependent region release after ACK or NAK timeout
      3. 4.11.3 IMS Version 12: OTMA SQ enhancement
      4. 4.11.4 IMS Version 12: Reduced path length for OTMA transaction processing
      5. 4.11.5 IMS Version 13: OTMA transaction expiration at GU time
      6. 4.11.6 IMS Version 13: OTMA ALT-PCB output for shared queues
      7. 4.11.7 Version 13: OTMA early termination notification
      8. 4.11.8 IMS Version 13: MIPS reduction enhancement for YTIB hashing
      9. 4.11.9 OTMA client type notification
    12. 4.12 Diagnostic tests that are related to OTMA
    13. 4.13 OTMA diagnostic enhancements
      1. 4.13.1 IMS Version 11: SQ BE transaction abend error message support
  12. Chapter 5. SOAP application technology
    1. 5.1 IMS Enterprise Suite SOAP Gateway
    2. 5.2 IMS SOAP Gateway overview
    3. 5.3 IMS SOAP Gateway and your IMS applications
      1. 5.3.1 XML-to-bytes and bytes-to-XML
    4. 5.4 What is new in IMS SOAP Gateway V2.2
      1. 5.4.1 Advanced installation support
      2. 5.4.2 The new installation architecture in IMS Enterprise Suite V2.2
      3. 5.4.3 Installing multiple copies of SOAP Gateway
      4. 5.4.4 Monitoring, tracking, and logging
      5. 5.4.5 SOAP Gateway message processing events
      6. 5.4.6 COBOL top down and multiple hosts
      7. 5.4.7 SOAP Gateway support for multiple hosts for callout
      8. 5.4.8 WS-Security for synchronous callout and migration
      9. 5.4.9 IMS Enterprise Suite V3.1 features
    5. 5.5 Asynchronous callout with SOAP Gateway
      1. 5.5.1 Starting the web service operation
      2. 5.5.2 Returning the callout response message to IMS
      3. 5.5.3 Web services callout scenarios for Asynchronous Callout
    6. 5.6 Synchronous callout with IMS SOAP Gateway
      1. 5.6.1 Synchronous callout support with IMS SOAP Gateway
      2. 5.6.2 Synchronous callout user scenarios
    7. 5.7 Multisegment support
    8. 5.8 Security enhancements
    9. 5.9 IMS SOAP Gateway features and compatibilities
  13. Chapter 6. Java Platform, Enterprise Edition application technology
    1. 6.1 Java Platform, Enterprise Edition
      1. 6.1.1 Developing Java applications
      2. 6.1.2 IBM Rational Developer for System z
      3. 6.1.3 The IBM IMS TM Resource Adapter
    2. 6.2 Key features of the IMS TM Resource Adapter
      1. 6.2.1 Features that are introduced in IMS TM Resource Adapter Version 10.2
      2. 6.2.2 Features that are introduced in IMS TM Resource Adapter Version 11
      3. 6.2.3 New features in IMS TM Resource Adapter Version 12
    3. 6.3 Installing the IMS TM Resource Adapter
    4. 6.4 Callin request support
    5. 6.5 Callout request support
      1. 6.5.1 Destinations for callouts through IMS TM Resource Adapter
      2. 6.5.2 Asynchronous callout requests
      3. 6.5.3 Synchronous callout requests
      4. 6.5.4 Issuing synchronous callout requests from a Java dependent region
      5. 6.5.5 IMS Enterprise Suite Connect APIs
      6. 6.5.6 IBM IMS DB Resource Adapter (DB Universal Driver)
      7. 6.5.7 IMS Universal drivers: Configuring connections to IMS
  14. Part 2 Extended architecture and application technology of IBM IMS
  15. Chapter 7. COBOL dynamic SQL access to IBM IMS databases
    1. 7.1 Overview
    2. 7.2 SQL statements that are supported by IMS
    3. 7.3 Sample IMS COBOL SQL program
  16. Chapter 8. The IBM IMS catalog
    1. 8.1 Overview and objectives of the catalog
    2. 8.2 Physical structure of the catalog database
      1. 8.2.1 Segments of the catalog database
    3. 8.3 IMS catalog database installation and management
      1. 8.3.1 Installation
      2. 8.3.2 IMS catalog initial data population
      3. 8.3.3 ACB generation and changes
      4. 8.3.4 IMS Catalog Copy utility
      5. 8.3.5 Keeping multiple versions of metadata in the catalog
      6. 8.3.6 IMS Catalog Record Purge utility
      7. 8.3.7 Automatically creating the IMS catalog database data sets
      8. 8.3.8 Using the IMS catalog without DBRC
      9. 8.3.9 Aliases and sharing
      10. 8.3.10 Definitions that are needed for the IMS catalog
    4. 8.4 Application usage of the catalog
      1. 8.4.1 DBD and PSB source changes
      2. 8.4.2 Get Unique Record DL/I call
      3. 8.4.3 IMS catalog access
      4. 8.4.4 SSA enhancements
    5. 8.5 The role of the IMS Enterprise Suite Explorer for Development
      1. 8.5.1 Extending IMS database definitions with the IMS Explorer
    6. 8.6 Using IMS Explorer to capture IMS metadata
    7. 8.7 Enhancements to the IMS Universal drivers
      1. 8.7.1 Access to the IMS databases from Java
      2. 8.7.2 Using the metadata information in the DL/I access
  17. Chapter 9. IBM IMS Explorer and Open Database connectivity
    1. 9.1 IMS Explorer for Developers
    2. 9.2 How IMS Enterprise Suite extends access to IMS
      1. 9.2.1 IMS Explorer demonstration
      2. 9.2.2 Creating or modifying full-function or Fast Path database PCBs
      3. 9.2.3 Connecting to an IMS database for SQL access
      4. 9.2.4 Establishing the host connection with IMS Explorer for Developer
      5. 9.2.5 Creating and running SQL queries against an IMS database
  18. Chapter 10. IBM IMS Data Provider for Microsoft .NET
    1. 10.1 Overview of the IBM IMS Data Provider for Microsoft .NET
      1. 10.1.1 ADO.NET application development
      2. 10.1.2 IMS Data Provider prerequisites and system requirements
      3. 10.1.3 IMS Data Provider architecture
    2. 10.2 Programming applications with IBM IMS Data Provider for Microsoft .NET
      1. 10.2.1 Generic coding with the ADO.NET common base classes
      2. 10.2.2 Connecting to IMS from an application
      3. 10.2.3 Connection pooling with the IMS Data Provider
      4. 10.2.4 SQL data type representation in ADO.NET database applications
      5. 10.2.5 Running SQL statements
      6. 10.2.6 Reading result sets
      7. 10.2.7 Connected versus Disconnected Modes
      8. 10.2.8 Choosing between DataReader and DataSet
      9. 10.2.9 Using IMSDataAdapter and DataSet for Disconnected data processing
      10. 10.2.10 Processing metadata with IMS Data Provider
      11. 10.2.11 Tracing IMS Data Provider
  19. Chapter 11. IBM IMS mobile enablement solutions
    1. 11.1 IMS mobile enablement
    2. 11.2 IBM Worklight
      1. 11.2.1 Accessing IMS transactions through Worklight HTTP Adapter
      2. 11.2.2 Accessing IMS data through the Worklight SQL adapter
      3. 11.2.3 Using a custom Java application in Worklight to connect to IMS
    3. 11.3 IBM WebSphere DataPower
      1. 11.3.1 RESTful service facade
      2. 11.3.2 DMZ Proxy to secure a mobile network
      3. 11.3.3 Seamless enterprise integration for IBM Worklight
  20. Chapter 12. IBM WebSphere DataPower and IBM IMS integration
    1. 12.1 WebSphere DataPower SOA Appliances introduction
    2. 12.2 WebSphere DataPower capabilities
      1. 12.2.1 Any-to-any transformation engine
      2. 12.2.2 Control
      3. 12.2.3 Domains
      4. 12.2.4 Firewall
      5. 12.2.5 Firmware updates
      6. 12.2.6 Interfaces
      7. 12.2.7 Logging
      8. 12.2.8 Optimization
      9. 12.2.9 Monitoring
      10. 12.2.10 Multi-Protocol Gateway
      11. 12.2.11 WS-Proxy
      12. 12.2.12 XML management interface
      13. 12.2.13 XML manager
      14. 12.2.14 XML processing
      15. 12.2.15 XSL co-processor
    3. 12.3 WebSphere DataPower and IMS integration solutions
      1. 12.3.1 Requirements for inbound access to IMS transactions
      2. 12.3.2 Requirements for IMS Synchronous Callout support
      3. 12.3.3 Requirements for access to the IMS database
      4. 12.3.4 Inbound access to IMS transactions from an external client
      5. 12.3.5 Outbound support from IMS synchronous callout to an external client
      6. 12.3.6 Access to IMS databases
  21. Part 3 Appendixes
  22. Appendix A. Sample code
    1. A.1 ICAL Synchronous Program Switch COBOL program
    2. A.2 Asynchronous callout to a StateLess Session bean
    3. A.3 Asynchronous callout to a Message Driven bean
    4. A.4 Synchronous callout to a StateLess Session bean
    5. A.5 Synchronous callout to a Message Driven bean
    6. A.6 Feed from an IMS application in MashupHub
    7. A.7 WSDL files for a DLIModel generated web service
    8. A.8 XSD files for a DLIModel generated web service
    9. A.9 Enhanced Provider MPP template sample
  23. Appendix B. Additional material
    1. Locating the web material
    2. Using the web material
  24. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  25. Back cover