You are previewing Implementing IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments.
O'Reilly logo
Implementing IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication shows how to integrate IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments (IBM SDN VE) seamlessly within a new or existing data center.

This book is aimed at pre- and post-sales support, targeting network administrators and other technical professionals that want to get an overview of this new and exciting technology, and see how it fits into the overall vision of a truly Software Defined Environment. It shows you all of the steps that are required to design, install, maintain, and troubleshoot the IBM SDN VE product. It also highlights specific, real-world examples that showcase the power and flexibility that IBM SDN VE has over traditional solutions with a legacy network infrastructure that is applied to virtual systems.

This book assumes that you have a general familiarity with networking and virtualization. It does not assume an in-depth understanding of KVM or VMware. It is written for administrators who want to get a quick start with IBM SDN VE in their respective virtualized infrastructure, and to get some virtual machines up and running by using the rich features of the product in a short amount of time (days, not week, or months).

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. Introducing Software Defined Environments and Software Defined Networking
    1. 1.1 Software Defined Environments
      1. 1.1.1 IBM SmartCloud Orchestrator
    2. 1.2 Introducing Software Defined Networking
      1. 1.2.1 Benefits of Software Defined Networking
    3. 1.3 The relationship between Software Defined Environments and Software Defined Networking
      1. 1.3.1 Overlay (DOVE)
      2. 1.3.2 OpenFlow
    4. 1.4 Points of concern and how Software Defined Networking helps
    5. 1.5 OpenDaylight project and IBM contributions
    6. 1.6 Conclusion
  5. Chapter 2. Introducing IBM System Networking Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments
    1. 2.1 Introduction to IBM SDN VE
      1. 2.1.1 Product versions
    2. 2.2 Elements of the IBM SDN VE solution
    3. 2.3 IBM SDN VE components
      1. 2.3.1 DOVE Management Console
      2. 2.3.2 Distributed Connectivity Service
      3. 2.3.3 DOVE Gateways
      4. 2.3.4 5000V Host Module
    4. 2.4 IBM SDN VE 5000V Distributed vSwitch for VMware vSphere
    5. 2.5 Prerequisites and system requirements
      1. 2.5.1 IBM SDN VE VMware Edition
      2. 2.5.2 IBM SDN VE KVM Edition
    6. 2.6 Supported component capacity limits for IBM SDN VE
    7. 2.7 IBM SDN VE solution advantages
    8. 2.8 Unified Controller
    9. 2.9 Introduction to overlay network protocols
      1. 2.9.1 Existing segmentation and associated challenges
    10. 2.10 VXLAN, NVGRE, and STT
      1. 2.10.1 Virtual Extensible Local Area Network
  6. Chapter 3. Introduction to IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments components
    1. 3.1 DOVE Management Console
      1. 3.1.1 Functions of the DMC
      2. 3.1.2 DMC architecture
      3. 3.1.3 CLI mode
      4. 3.1.4 Web administration
      5. 3.1.5 Northbound API
      6. 3.1.6 High availability
    2. 3.2 Distributed Services Appliance
    3. 3.3 Distributed Connectivity Service
      1. 3.3.1 Distributed Connectivity Service cluster formation
      2. 3.3.2 DCS replication factor
      3. 3.3.3 DCS node failure example
      4. 3.3.4 DCS Connectivity Services
      5. 3.3.5 DCS configured version
    4. 3.4 Distributed Gateway components
    5. 3.5 Distributed External Gateway
    6. 3.6 DGW as Distributed VLAN Gateway
      1. 3.6.1 Special gateway rules
    7. 3.7 IBM SDN VE vSwitch
      1. 3.7.1 IBM SDN VE vSwitch software
      2. 3.7.2 IBM SDN VE vSwitch kernel module
      3. 3.7.3 IBM SDN VE vSwitch user module
      4. 3.7.4 Encapsulation
      5. 3.7.5 Supported protocols
      6. 3.7.6 Communication with other modules
    8. 3.8 IBM Distributed Virtual Switch 5000V for VMware vSphere and 5000V Host Module
    9. 3.9 KVM SDN VE vSwitch and the DOVE agent
  7. Chapter 4. Installing and configuring IBM Software Defined Networking for Virtual Environments VMware Edition
    1. 4.1 Obtaining the IBM SDN VE VMware Edition software
      1. 4.1.1 Passport Advantage software download
      2. 4.1.2 PartnerWorld Access for trials and evaluations
    2. 4.2 Understanding the different layers
      1. 4.2.1 Management network
      2. 4.2.2 Tunnel endpoint network
      3. 4.2.3 Overlay network
    3. 4.3 Hardware components
    4. 4.4 Installation of IBM SDN VE for VMware
      1. 4.4.1 Summary of the installation procedures
      2. 4.4.2 IBM SDN VE VMware Edition IP checklist
      3. 4.4.3 Deploying the DOVE Management Console
      4. 4.4.4 Deploying the Distributed Services Appliance and pointing it to the DMC cluster IP address
      5. 4.4.5 Deploying the 5000V Distributed Overlay Virtual Ethernet vSwitch
      6. 4.4.6 DOVE Management Console
      7. 4.4.7 5000V Host Module installation
      8. 4.4.8 Attaching hosts to the vDS uplinks
      9. 4.4.9 Defining the underlay networks
      10. 4.4.10 Attaching VMs to the overlay networks and port groups
      11. 4.4.11 Defining a Distributed VLAN Gateway
      12. 4.4.12 Redundant VGW
      13. 4.4.13 Defining an EGW
      14. 4.4.14 Redundant IP external gateway
  8. Chapter 5. Installing IBM Software Defined Networking for Virtual Environments in a KVM environment
    1. 5.1 Virtualization on KVM
      1. 5.1.1 Software and hardware requirements
      2. 5.1.2 Installing KVM on the host system
    2. 5.2 Recommended network configuration for IBM SDN VE
      1. 5.2.1 Management network
      2. 5.2.2 Data network
      3. 5.2.3 EXT network
    3. 5.3 Installation of the Unified Controller
      1. 5.3.1 Images for the Unified Controller
      2. 5.3.2 Configuration file that is used to create a virtual machine
      3. 5.3.3 Defining the controller by using virsh
      4. 5.3.4 Starting the Unified Controller
      5. 5.3.5 Configuration
    4. 5.4 License
      1. 5.4.1 License mechanism
      2. 5.4.2 Installing the license
    5. 5.5 Installation of Distributed Services Appliances
      1. 5.5.1 Images for the Distributed Services Appliance
      2. 5.5.2 Configuration files
      3. 5.5.3 Defining the domain using virsh
      4. 5.5.4 Starting the IBM DSA
      5. 5.5.5 Configuration
    6. 5.6 Installation of the Dove Agent
      1. 5.6.1 Starting the agent on the host
    7. 5.7 Exporting the network from the DMC
    8. 5.8 Creating the guest VM and assigning it to the correct network
    9. 5.9 Example of a Distributed VLAN Gateway and Distributed External Gateway
  9. Chapter 6. IBM Software Defined Networking for Virtual Environments architecture and design
    1. 6.1 IBM SDN VE architecture introduction
      1. 6.1.1 Availability
      2. 6.1.2 Capacity estimates and planning
      3. 6.1.3 Performance
      4. 6.1.4 Scalability
      5. 6.1.5 Reliability
      6. 6.1.6 Service-level agreement
      7. 6.1.7 System management
      8. 6.1.8 Security
      9. 6.1.9 Standards
      10. 6.1.10 Serviceability
      11. 6.1.11 Backup and recovery
      12. 6.1.12 External regulations
    2. 6.2 System context
      1. 6.2.1 Underlay switching infrastructure
      2. 6.2.2 Underlay IP infrastructure
      3. 6.2.3 Storage infrastructure
      4. 6.2.4 Network services
      5. 6.2.5 Business continuity services
      6. 6.2.6 Backup and restore services
      7. 6.2.7 Authentication services
      8. 6.2.8 Management services
      9. 6.2.9 Usage and accounting services
    3. 6.3 Architectural decisions
    4. 6.4 Solution design
      1. 6.4.1 Initial considerations
      2. 6.4.2 The path to design the solution
      3. 6.4.3 Functional and non-functional requirements
      4. 6.4.4 Logical design
      5. 6.4.5 Detailed design
      6. 6.4.6 Implementation
  10. Chapter 7. Use case 1: VM mobility and relocation
    1. 7.1 Description and synopsis
      1. 7.1.1 Points to consider for VM mobility
    2. 7.2 Advantages of an IBM SDN VE environment
    3. 7.3 Lab environment overview
      1. 7.3.1 Environment components and diagram
    4. 7.4 Setup and configuration
      1. 7.4.1 VM output
      2. 7.4.2 VMware vCenter output
      3. 7.4.3 DOVE Management Console output
      4. 7.4.4 IBM SDN VE 5000V output
      5. 7.4.5 Communication output
      6. 7.4.6 Physical data center network output
    5. 7.5 Use case post-implementation evidence
      1. 7.5.1 Lab environment diagram
      2. 7.5.2 DMC output
      3. 7.5.3 VMware vCenter output
      4. 7.5.4 IBM SDN VE 5000V output
      5. 7.5.5 Communication output
      6. 7.5.6 Physical data center network output
    6. 7.6 Conclusion
  11. Chapter 8. Use case 2: Data center virtualization to virtualization
    1. 8.1 IBM SDN VE simultaneous integration
      1. 8.1.1 Important advantage
      2. 8.1.2 Combined solution
      3. 8.1.3 Separated solution
  12. Chapter 9. Use case 3: Firewall and DNS in multidomains
    1. 9.1 Description and synopsis
    2. 9.2 Considerations before integration
      1. 9.2.1 Prerequisites
    3. 9.3 An IBM SDN VE environment with a EGW as the routing point
    4. 9.4 Data flow in IBM SDN VE gateways per tenant
    5. 9.5 Data flow in IBM SDN VE gateways and firewalls for each tenant
    6. 9.6 Multidomain IP communication on the same IP subnet
      1. 9.6.1 Same IP subnet communication
  13. Chapter 10. Use case 4: Multitenancy
    1. 10.1 Multitenancy for software defined networking
      1. 10.1.1 Multitenancy within the same domain
      2. 10.1.2 Multitenancy within different domains
      3. 10.1.3 Multitenancy and shared resources
  14. Chapter 11. Advanced features
    1. 11.1 Capacity management
      1. 11.1.1 Factors that affect network performance
      2. 11.1.2 Network performance management tasks
      3. 11.1.3 Conclusion
    2. 11.2 IBM SDN VE Northbound API
      1. 11.2.1 Introduction
      2. 11.2.2 Encryption
      3. 11.2.3 Request/Response types
      4. 11.2.4 Filtering and column selection
      5. 11.2.5 Examples
    3. 11.3 IBM SDN VE and OpenStack
    4. 11.4 IBM SDN VE and IBM SmartCloud Orchestrator integration
      1. 11.4.1 Creating a self-service offering in SmartCloud Orchestrator
      2. 11.4.2 Shared overlay appliances and security
  15. Chapter 12. Troubleshooting and maintenance
    1. 12.1 Troubleshooting an IBM SDN VE VMware Edition installation during the installation process
      1. 12.1.1 Identifying a problem
      2. 12.1.2 Troubleshooting the underlay network
      3. 12.1.3 Troubleshooting the overlay network
    2. 12.2 Troubleshooting an IBM SDN VE VMware Edition installation postinstallation
      1. 12.2.1 Removing a network and port group from the Networks tab
      2. 12.2.2 Show command examples
    3. 12.3 Limitations
    4. 12.4 Upgrading components in a running VMware vSphere 5.0 or 5.1 environment
      1. 12.4.1 Understanding what must be updated
      2. 12.4.2 Upgrading the Distributed Management Console
      3. 12.4.3 Upgrading the Distributed Connectivity Service
      4. 12.4.4 Upgrading the Distributed Gateway
      5. 12.4.5 Upgrading the Distributed Overlay Virtual Ethernet vSwitch
      6. 12.4.6 Updating the IBM SDN VE 5000V Host Module
    5. 12.5 Components requiring updates after upgrading to VMware vSphere 5.5
      1. 12.5.1 Updating the IBM SDN VE 5000V Host Module
  16. Appendix A. Overlay protocols in depth
    1. Stateless Transport Tunnels
    2. Network Virtualization using Generic Routing Encapsulation
  17. Related publications
    1. Online resources
    2. Help from IBM
  18. Back cover
  19. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  20. Notices
    1. Trademarks