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IBM z/OS V2R2 Communications Server TCP/IP Implementation: Volume 2 Standard Applications

Book Description

For more than 50 years, IBM® mainframes have supported an extraordinary portion of the world's computing work, providing centralized corporate databases and mission-critical enterprise-wide applications. IBM System z®, the latest generation of the IBM distinguished family of mainframe systems, has come a long way from its IBM System/360 heritage. Likewise, its IBM z/OS® operating system is far superior to its predecessors in providing, among many other capabilities, world-class and state-of-the-art support for the TCP/IP Internet Protocol suite.

TCP/IP is a large and evolving collection of communication protocols that are managed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), an open, volunteer organization. Because of its openness, the TCP/IP protocol suite has become the foundation for the set of technologies that form the basis of the Internet. The convergence of IBM mainframe capabilities with Internet technology, connectivity, and standards (particularly TCP/IP) is dramatically changing the face of information technology and driving requirements for even more secure, scalable, and highly available mainframe TCP/IP implementations.

The IBM z/OS Communications Server TCP/IP Implementation series provides understandable, step-by-step guidance for enabling the most commonly used and important functions of z/OS Communications Server TCP/IP.

This IBM Redbooks® publication provides useful implementation scenarios and configuration recommendations for many of the TCP/IP standard applications that z/OS Communications Server supports.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. IBM Redbooks promotions
  4. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  5. Chapter 1. The syslog daemon
    1. 1.1 Conceptual overview of syslogd
      1. 1.1.1 What is syslogd
      2. 1.1.2 How syslogd works
      3. 1.1.3 How can syslogd be deployed
    2. 1.2 Log messages to different files and to a single file
      1. 1.2.1 Description of logging to multiple files and to a single file
      2. 1.2.2 Configuration of multiple files and a single file
      3. 1.2.3 Verification of multiple files and a single file
    3. 1.3 Starting two syslogd instances
      1. 1.3.1 Description of two syslogd instances
      2. 1.3.2 Configuring two syslogd instances
      3. 1.3.3 Verification for running two syslogd instances
    4. 1.4 The syslogd functions
      1. 1.4.1 The syslogd operator commands
      2. 1.4.2 Description of syslogd automatic archival
      3. 1.4.3 The syslogd browser and search facility
    5. 1.5 Problem determination for syslogd logging
    6. 1.6 Additional information sources for syslogd
  6. Chapter 2. TN3270E Telnet server
    1. 2.1 Conceptual overview of the TN3270E server
      1. 2.1.1 What is the TN3270E server
      2. 2.1.2 How does the TN3270E server work
      3. 2.1.3 Possible uses for the TN3270E server
    2. 2.2 TN3270E server in a single image
      1. 2.2.1 Description of the exampleTN3270E server scenario
      2. 2.2.2 Configuration of the TN3270E server
      3. 2.2.3 Activation of the TN3270E server
      4. 2.2.4 Verification of the TN3270E server
      5. 2.2.5 Administration and management of the TN3270E server
    3. 2.3 Multiple TN3270E servers in a multiple image environment
      1. 2.3.1 Multiple TN3270E servers within the sysplex
      2. 2.3.2 Configuration of multiple TN3270E servers within the sysplex
      3. 2.3.3 Activation and verification of multiple TN3270E servers in the sysplex
    4. 2.4 Multiple TN3270E servers using LU name server and LU name requester
      1. 2.4.1 Description of TN3270E servers using LU name server and requester
      2. 2.4.2 Configuration of TN3270E servers within sysplex using LU name server and requester
      3. 2.4.3 Activation and verification of LU name server and requester within sysplex
      4. 2.4.4 Scenario: LU name server automated takeover when active name server fails
    5. 2.5 TN3270E server in a single image using SHAREACB
      1. 2.5.1 Overview of SHAREACB utilization
      2. 2.5.2 Configuration of the TN3270E server with SHAREACB option
      3. 2.5.3 Activation of the TN3270E server
      4. 2.5.4 Verification of the TN3270E server with SHAREACB defined
    6. 2.6 TN3270 support of TSO logon reconnect
    7. 2.7 Problem determination for the TN3270E servers
      1. 2.7.1 Review the definition statements within the profile
      2. 2.7.2 Use TCP/IP and Telnet commands
      3. 2.7.3 Use the MSG07 statement in the TN3270 profile
      4. 2.7.4 Use SMF records to capture TN3270 connection activity
      5. 2.7.5 Use trace data
      6. 2.7.6 Tips for multiple TN3270E servers in a Parallel Sysplex environment
      7. 2.7.7 Tips for LU name server and LU name requester diagnosis
    8. 2.8 Additional information sources for the TN3270E server
  7. Chapter 3. File Transfer Protocol
    1. 3.1 Conceptual overview of FTP
      1. 3.1.1 What FTP is
      2. 3.1.2 How FTP works
      3. 3.1.3 How FTP can be used
    2. 3.2 Basic FTP without security
      1. 3.2.1 Description of basic FTP without security
      2. 3.2.2 Planning for the basic FTP environment without security
      3. 3.2.3 Configuration of basic FTP without security
      4. 3.2.4 Activation and verification for basic FTP without security
    3. 3.3 Multiple FTP servers in a sysplex
      1. 3.3.1 Description of multiple FTP servers in a sysplex
      2. 3.3.2 Configuration for multiple FTP servers in the sysplex
      3. 3.3.3 Activation and verification of FTP servers within sysplex
    4. 3.4 FTP client using batch
      1. 3.4.1 Description of FTP client using batch
      2. 3.4.2 Configuration of FTP client using batch
      3. 3.4.3 Activation and verification of FTP client batch job
    5. 3.5 FTP client application programming interface
      1. 3.5.1 FTP client API for REXX
      2. 3.5.2 FTP client API for Java
    6. 3.6 FTP access to UNIX named pipes
      1. 3.6.1 What are UNIX named pipes
      2. 3.6.2 Description of FTP access to UNIX named pipes
      3. 3.6.3 FTP configuration options
      4. 3.6.4 Use the z/OS FTP client to create a named pipe in the z/OS FTP server
      5. 3.6.5 Supported z/OS FTP subcommands
      6. 3.6.6 Storing into a named pipe
    7. 3.7 FTP large data set access
      1. 3.7.1 The extended address volume
      2. 3.7.2 FTP support for large format data set
      3. 3.7.3 Example of EAS-eligible data set allocation for FTP transfer
    8. 3.8 Miscellaneous configuration settings of FTP
      1. 3.8.1 A single generic FTP server in a multiple stack z/OS image
      2. 3.8.2 FTP network management interface with SMF
    9. 3.9 Problem determination for FTP
    10. 3.10 Additional information sources for FTP
  8. Chapter 4. Simple Network Management Protocol
    1. 4.1 Conceptual overview of SNMP
      1. 4.1.1 What SNMP is
      2. 4.1.2 How SNMP works
      3. 4.1.3 How SNMP can be applied
    2. 4.2 z/OS SNMP agent
      1. 4.2.1 Description of the z/OS SNMP agent
      2. 4.2.2 Configuration of the z/OS SNMP agent
      3. 4.2.3 Activation and verification of the z/OS SNMP agents
    3. 4.3 z/OS SNMP subagents
      1. 4.3.1 Description of SNMP subagents
      2. 4.3.2 Configuration of SNMP subagents
      3. 4.3.3 Activation and Verification of SNMP subagents
    4. 4.4 z/OS SNMP client command
      1. 4.4.1 Description of the SNMP client commands
      2. 4.4.2 Configuration tasks for the SNMP client commands
      3. 4.4.3 Using the osnmp/snmp z/OS UNIX command
    5. 4.5 Problem determination for the SNMP facilities
    6. 4.6 Additional information sources for SNMP
  9. Chapter 5. IP printing
    1. 5.1 Conceptual overview of IP printing
      1. 5.1.1 What IP printing is
      2. 5.1.2 How IP printing works
      3. 5.1.3 How IP printing can be applied
    2. 5.2 LPR/LPD
      1. 5.2.1 Description of LPR/LPD
      2. 5.2.2 Configuration tasks for LPR/LPD
      3. 5.2.3 Activation and verification of LPR/LPD
    3. 5.3 Infoprint Server
      1. 5.3.1 Description of the Infoprint Server
      2. 5.3.2 Configuration of Infoprint Server
    4. 5.4 Problem determination for LPR/LPD
    5. 5.5 Additional information sources for IP printing
  10. Chapter 6. INETD
    1. 6.1 Conceptual overview of INETD
      1. 6.1.1 What INETD is
      2. 6.1.2 How INETD works
      3. 6.1.3 How INETD can be applied
    2. 6.2 A single INETD setup
      1. 6.2.1 Description of the INETD setup
      2. 6.2.2 Configuration tasks for INETD setup
      3. 6.2.3 Activation and verification of INETD
    3. 6.3 Problem determination for INETD
    4. 6.4 Additional information sources for INETD
  11. Chapter 7. z/OS mail servers
    1. 7.1 Conceptual overview of z/OS mail applications
      1. 7.1.1 z/OS mail services
      2. 7.1.2 How z/OS mail services work
      3. 7.1.3 How z/OS mail services are applied
    2. 7.2 z/OS CSSMTP, a mail forwarding SMTP client
      1. 7.2.1 Advantages of using z/OS CSSMTP client
      2. 7.2.2 Configuration tasks for the z/OS CSSMTP client
      3. 7.2.3 Verification of the z/OS CSSMTP client
    3. 7.3 z/OS SMTP as a mail server
      1. 7.3.1 Description of z/OS SMTP server
      2. 7.3.2 Configuration tasks for the z/OS SMTP server
      3. 7.3.3 Verification of the z/OS SMTP server
    4. 7.4 Using sendmail and popper as mail servers
      1. 7.4.1 Description of sendmail and popper
      2. 7.4.2 Configuration tasks for sendmail and popper
      3. 7.4.3 Verification of sendmail and popper setup
    5. 7.5 Using sendmail as a client
      1. 7.5.1 Description of the sendmail client
      2. 7.5.2 Configuration tasks for the sendmail client
      3. 7.5.3 Verification of the sendmail client
    6. 7.6 Migrating to CSSMTP
      1. 7.6.1 CSSMTP compatibility with SMTPD client
      2. 7.6.2 Configuration tasks for implementing CSSMTP compatibility test mode
      3. 7.6.3 Migrating from SMTPD to CSSMTP
    7. 7.7 Problem determination for the mail facilities
      1. 7.7.1 Problem determination tasks for the z/OS SMTP server
      2. 7.7.2 Problem determination for sendmail and popper
      3. 7.7.3 Problem determination for the sendmail client
    8. 7.8 Additional information sources for mail servers
  12. Chapter 8. z/OS UNIX Telnet server
    1. 8.1 Conceptual overview of otelnetd
      1. 8.1.1 What otelnetd is
      2. 8.1.2 How otelnetd works
      3. 8.1.3 How otelnetd can be applied
    2. 8.2 z/OS UNIX Telnet server implementation
      1. 8.2.1 Description of the otelnetd server
      2. 8.2.2 Configuration tasks for otelnetd
      3. 8.2.3 Activation and verification of otelnetd
    3. 8.3 Problem determination for otelnetd
    4. 8.4 Additional information sources for otelnetd
  13. Chapter 9. Remote execution
    1. 9.1 Conceptual overview of remote execution
      1. 9.1.1 What remote execution is
      2. 9.1.2 How remote execution works
      3. 9.1.3 How remote execution can be applied
    2. 9.2 TSO remote execution server
      1. 9.2.1 Description of TSO remote execution server
      2. 9.2.2 Configuration tasks for TSO remote execution server
      3. 9.2.3 Activation and verification of TSO remote execution server
    3. 9.3 z/OS UNIX remote execution server
      1. 9.3.1 Description of z/OS UNIX remote execution server
      2. 9.3.2 Configuration tasks for z/OS UNIX remote execution server
      3. 9.3.3 Activation and verification of z/OS UNIX remote execution server
    4. 9.4 REXEC TSO client command using user ID/password
      1. 9.4.1 Description of REXEC TSO with user ID and password
      2. 9.4.2 Configuration of REXEC TSO with user ID and password
      3. 9.4.3 Verification of REXEC TSO with user ID and password
    5. 9.5 REXEC TSO client command using the NETRC data set
      1. 9.5.1 Description of REXEC TSO client using NETRC
      2. 9.5.2 Configuration of REXEC TSO client using NETRC
      3. 9.5.3 Verification of REXEC TSO client using NETRC
    6. 9.6 REXEC UNIX client command
      1. 9.6.1 Description of the REXEC UNIX client command
      2. 9.6.2 Configuration of the REXEC UNIX client command
      3. 9.6.3 Verification of the REXEC UNIX client command
    7. 9.7 Problem determination for z/OS remote execution facilities
      1. 9.7.1 Problem determination for TSO remote execution
      2. 9.7.2 Problem determination for REXEC TSO with user ID and password
      3. 9.7.3 Problem determination of REXEC TSO using NETRC
      4. 9.7.4 Problem determination for the REXEC UNIX client command
      5. 9.7.5 Recovery for server job table full condition
      6. 9.7.6 Diagnostic messages for debugging
    8. 9.8 Additional information sources for remote execution and remote shell
  14. Appendix A. Environment variables
    1. A.1 Description of the environment variable information
    2. A.2 Native MVS API environment
    3. A.3 z/OS UNIX API environment
    4. A.4 z/OS UNIX System Services environment variables
    5. A.5 Language Environment variables
    6. A.6 Application-specific environment variables
    7. A.7 Setting environment variables
  15. Appendix B. Sample files provided with TCP/IP
    1. B.1 Sample files by component
  16. Appendix C. Configuration files: TN3270E stand-alone scenario
    1. C.1 SC31 TN3270B Server PROC for TN3270 stand-alone scenario
    2. C.2 SC31 TN3270B Server profile for TN3270 stand-alone scenario
    3. C.3 SC31 TCPIPB stack PROC for TN3270 stand-alone scenario
    4. C.4 SC31 TCPIPB stack PROFILE for TN3270 stand-alone scenario
    5. C.5 SC31 OMPROUTE PROC for TN3270 stand-alone scenario
    6. C.6 SC31 OMPROUTE STDENV file for TN3270 stand-alone task scenario
    7. C.7 SC31 OMPROUTE CONFIG for TN3270 stand-alone scenario
  17. Appendix D. Multiple TN3270E Telnet servers and sysplex distribution using the LUNS and LUNR scenario
    1. D.1 SC30 files for LUNS and LUNR scenario
    2. D.2 SC31 files for LUNS and LUNR scenario
  18. Appendix E. FTP and translation tables
    1. E.1 Conceptual overview of FTP translation
    2. E.2 Using the RFC2389 and RFC2640 FTP features
    3. E.3 Selecting translation tables
  19. Appendix F. The example implementation environment
    1. F.1 The environment used for all four books
    2. F.2 The focus for this book
  20. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  21. Back cover