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IBM z/OS V2R1 Communications Server TCP/IP Implementation Volume 3: High Availability, Scalability, and Performance

Book Description

For more than 40 years, IBM® mainframes have supported an extraordinary portion of the world's computing work, providing centralized corporate databases and mission-critical enterprise-wide applications. IBM System z®, the latest generation of the IBM distinguished family of mainframe systems, has come a long way from its IBM System/360 heritage. Likewise, its IBM z/OS® operating system is far superior to its predecessors in providing, among many other capabilities, world-class and state-of-the-art support for the TCP/IP Internet protocol suite.

TCP/IP is a large and evolving collection of communication protocols managed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), an open, volunteer organization. Because of its openness, the TCP/IP protocol suite has become the foundation for the set of technologies that form the basis of the Internet. The convergence of IBM mainframe capabilities with Internet technology, connectivity, and standards (particularly TCP/IP) is dramatically changing information technology and driving requirements for even more secure, scalable, and highly available mainframe TCP/IP implementations.

The IBM z/OS Communications Server TCP/IP Implementation series provides understandable, step-by-step guidance for enabling the most commonly used and important functions of z/OS Communications Server TCP/IP.

This IBM Redbooks® publication is for people who install and support z/OS Communications Server. It starts by describing virtual IP addressing (VIPA) for high-availability, with and without a dynamic routing protocol. It describes several workload balancing approaches with the z/OS Communications Server. It also explains optimized sysplex distributor intra-sysplex load balancing. This function represents improved application support using optimized local connections together with weight values from extended Workload Manager (WLM) interfaces. Finally, this book highlights important tuning parameters and suggests parameter values to maximize performance in many client installations.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. An introduction to IBM z/OS Communications Server high availability technologies
    1. 1.1 Overview of high availability
    2. 1.2 Fundamental technologies for z/OS TCP/IP availability
      1. 1.2.1 Single z/OS system availability
      2. 1.2.2 z/OS Parallel Sysplex availability
      3. 1.2.3 Virtual IP addressing
      4. 1.2.4 z/OS network connectivity and dynamic routing
      5. 1.2.5 Single-instance and multiple-instance applications
      6. 1.2.6 Balancing workload across multiple application instances
    3. 1.3 Quick-start table
  5. Chapter 2. Virtual IP addressing
    1. 2.1 Basic concepts of virtual IP addressing
      1. 2.1.1 Static VIPA
      2. 2.1.2 Dynamic VIPA
    2. 2.2 Importance of VIPA
    3. 2.3 Types of DVIPA
      1. 2.3.1 Stack-managed DVIPA
      2. 2.3.2 Event-activated DVIPA
      3. 2.3.3 Distributed DVIPA (sysplex distributor)
    4. 2.4 Static VIPA example
    5. 2.5 Dynamic VIPA example
      1. 2.5.1 Stack-managed DVIPA
      2. 2.5.2 Event-activated DVIPA example
      3. 2.5.3 Distributed DVIPA (sysplex distributor) example
    6. 2.6 Sysplex problem detection and recovery
      1. 2.6.1 Problem detection
      2. 2.6.2 Automatic control of leaving/joining the sysplex group
      3. 2.6.3 Automatic control of the DVIPA activation timing
      4. 2.6.4 Monitoring the network reachability
    7. 2.7 Controlling DVIPA with commands
      1. 2.7.1 LEAVEGROUP and JOINGROUP
      2. 2.7.2 DEACTIVATE and REACTIVATE
      3. 2.7.3 QUIESCE and RESUME
  6. Chapter 3. VIPA without dynamic routing
    1. 3.1 Basic concepts
    2. 3.2 High availability using ARP takeover in one TCP/IP stack
      1. 3.2.1 Implementation
      2. 3.2.2 Verification
    3. 3.3 High availability across multiple TCP/IP stacks using DVIPA
      1. 3.3.1 Implementation
      2. 3.3.2 Verification
    4. 3.4 Debugging tips
  7. Chapter 4. VIPA with dynamic routing
    1. 4.1 Basic concepts of high availability using dynamic routing
      1. 4.1.1 Dynamic routing and OMPROUTE
      2. 4.1.2 Advertisement of VIPA addresses
      3. 4.1.3 Multiple links between IP nodes and LPARs
    2. 4.2 Design example of DVIPA with dynamic routing
      1. 4.2.1 Overview
      2. 4.2.2 Implementation tasks
      3. 4.2.3 Verifying that the configuration works as planned
    3. 4.3 High availability scenarios
      1. 4.3.1 Adapter interface failure
      2. 4.3.2 Application movement using VIPADEFINE
      3. 4.3.3 Stack failure scenario using VIPADEFINE and VIPABACKUP
      4. 4.3.4 IPv6 stack failure scenario with VIPADEFINE and VIPABACKUP
    4. 4.4 Sysplex-Wide Security Associations
      1. 4.4.1 Enabling the SWSA in a stack with IPSec defined
      2. 4.4.2 Verifying the SWSA
      3. 4.4.3 Sysplex-Wide Security Associations for IPv6
  8. Chapter 5. Internal application workload balancing
    1. 5.1 Basic concepts of internal application workload balancing
    2. 5.2 Sysplex distributor
      1. 5.2.1 Sysplex distributor: Principles of operation
      2. 5.2.2 Sysplex distributor and quality of service policy
      3. 5.2.3 Monitoring the responsiveness of the target server
      4. 5.2.4 Workload distribution methods
      5. 5.2.5 Optimizing for sysplex distributor
      6. 5.2.6 Optimized routing
    3. 5.3 Sysplex distributor examples
      1. 5.3.1 Sysplex distributor using the server-specific WLM method
      2. 5.3.2 Sysplex distributor using the BASEWLM method
      3. 5.3.3 Sysplex distributor using the WEIGHTEDActive method
      4. 5.3.4 Sysplex distributor using the round-robin method
      5. 5.3.5 Sysplex distributor using the hot standby method
      6. 5.3.6 Sysplex distributor using the zIIP and zAAP specialty engines
    4. 5.4 Port sharing
      1. 5.4.1 SHAREPORT operation modes
      2. 5.4.2 Implementing port sharing using SHAREPORTWLM
    5. 5.5 Problem determination
  9. Chapter 6. External application workload balancing
    1. 6.1 Basic concepts of external load balancing
      1. 6.1.1 Understanding directed mode load balancing
      2. 6.1.2 z/OS Load Balancer Advisor
      3. 6.1.3 Server/Application State Protocol
      4. 6.1.4 External load balancer without LBA/SASP
      5. 6.1.5 External load balancer with LBA/SASP
      6. 6.1.6 Importance of external application workload balancing
    2. 6.2 Example of external load balancer without LBA/SASP
      1. 6.2.1 External load balancer without LBA/SASP implementation
    3. 6.3 Example of external load balancer with LBA/SASP
      1. 6.3.1 External load balancer with LBA/SASP implementation
      2. 6.3.2 TLS/SSL for z/OS Load Balancing Advisor
  10. Chapter 7. Intra-sysplex workload balancing
    1. 7.1 Optimizing sysplex distributor intra-sysplex load balancing
      1. 7.1.1 Current connections from WebSphere Application Server to EIS
      2. 7.1.2 Optimized multitier application workload balancing
    2. 7.2 Optimized multitier z/OS sysplex distributor load balancing
      1. 7.2.1 Tier 1 and tier 2 options
      2. 7.2.2 OPTLOCAL option
      3. 7.2.3 CPCSCOPE option parameter
      4. 7.2.4 IBM DataPower
      5. 7.2.5 Applied system configuration for optimized load balancing
      6. 7.2.6 OPTLOCAL test cases
    3. 7.3 WLM reporting abnormal conditions
      1. 7.3.1 Situation of current workload distribution decisions
      2. 7.3.2 Calculation of WLM weight and TSR
      3. 7.3.3 WLM interface for abnormal transactions and health status
  11. Chapter 8. Performance and tuning
    1. 8.1 General performance considerations
    2. 8.2 TCP/IP configuration files
      1. 8.2.1 MTU considerations
      2. 8.2.2 OSA-Express adapter interruption
      3. 8.2.3 Tracing
    3. 8.3 z/OS UNIX System Services tuning
    4. 8.4 Storage requirements
      1. 8.4.1 TCP and UDP buffer sizes
      2. 8.4.2 Communications Storage Manager use of storage
      3. 8.4.3 VTAM buffer settings
    5. 8.5 Application performance and capacity
      1. 8.5.1 Telnet (TN3270) capacity planning
      2. 8.5.2 FTP tuning
      3. 8.5.3 FTP capacity planning
    6. 8.6 z/OS Communications Server TCP/IP performance highlights
      1. 8.6.1 Detailed information about selected performance enhancements
    7. 8.7 TCP/IP performance quick checklist
    8. 8.8 IBM Health Checker for z/OS
      1. 8.8.1 What is a check
      2. 8.8.2 Checks owned by TCP/IP
      3. 8.8.3 Migration health check
      4. 8.8.4 Health Monitor checks with commands
      5. 8.8.5 Health Monitor checks with GUI
  12. Appendix A. HiperSockets Multiple Write
    1. A.1 The environment used for our tests
    2. A.2 Our test job streams
  13. Appendix B. Our implementation environment
    1. B.1 The environment used for all four books
    2. B.2 Our focus for this book
  14. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  15. Back cover