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IBM zEnterprise System Technical Introduction

Book Description

Recently, the IT industry has seen an explosion in applications, architectures, and platforms. With the generalized availability of the internet and the appearance of commodity hardware and software, several patterns have emerged that have gained center stage. Workloads have changed. Many applications, including mission-critical ones, are deployed in heterogeneous infrastructures. System z® design has adapted to this change. IBM® has a holistic approach to System z design, which includes hardware, software, and procedures. It takes into account a wide range of factors, including compatibility and investment protection, which ensures a tighter fit with IT requirements of an enterprise.

This IBM Redbooks® publication introduces the revolutionary scalable IBM zEnterprise System, which consists of the IBM zEnterprise 196 (z196) or the IBM zEnterprise 114 (z114), the IBM zEnterprise BladeCenter® Extension (zBX), and the IBM zEnterprise Unified Resource Manager.
IBM is taking a bold step by integrating heterogeneous platforms under the proven System z hardware management capabilities, while extending System z qualities of service to those platforms.

The z196 and z114 are general-purpose servers that are equally at ease with compute-intensive workloads and with I/O-intensive workloads.
The integration of heterogeneous platforms is based on IBM BladeCenter technology, allowing improvements in price and performance for key workloads, while enabling a new range of heterogeneous platform solutions.

The z196 and z114 are at the core of the enhanced System z platforms, which are designed to deliver technologies that businesses need today along with a foundation to drive future business growth.

The changes to this edition are based on the System z hardware announcement dated July 12, 2011.

This book provides basic information about z196, z114, zBX, and Unified Resource Manager capabilities, hardware functions and features, and associated software support. It is intended for IT managers, architects, consultants, and anyone else who wants to understand the elements of the zEnterprise System. For this introduction to the zEnterprise System, readers are not expected to be familiar with current IBM System z technology and terminology.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. The team who wrote this book
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. Proposing an IT infrastructure (r)evolution
    1. 1.1 IT infrastructures today
    2. 1.2 Future infrastructures
    3. 1.3 Introducing the zEnterprise System
    4. 1.4 Fixing the IT infrastructure
      1. 1.4.1 zEnterprise ensemble management
      2. 1.4.2 z196 and z114 virtualized environments
      3. 1.4.3 zBX virtualized environments
      4. 1.4.4 Flexibility and security
      5. 1.4.5 A cornerstone of a smart IT infrastructure
    5. 1.5 zEnterprise CPCs technical description
      1. 1.5.1 IBM zEnterprise 196
      2. 1.5.2 IBM zEnterprise 114
      3. 1.5.3 Processor cages and drawers
      4. 1.5.4 I/O subsystem
      5. 1.5.5 I/O connectivity
      6. 1.5.6 zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension
      7. 1.5.7 Unified Resource Manager
    6. 1.6 Capacity On Demand
    7. 1.7 Software
  5. Chapter 2. Achieving a (r)evolutionary IT infrastructure
    1. 2.1 zEnterprise ensembles and virtualization
    2. 2.2 Unified Resource Manager
    3. 2.3 Virtualization management
      1. 2.3.1 Hypervisor management
      2. 2.3.2 Virtual server management
      3. 2.3.3 Virtual network management
      4. 2.3.4 Virtual storage management
    4. 2.4 Performance management
    5. 2.5 Energy monitoring
    6. 2.6 Physical resources management
      1. 2.6.1 Role of the HMC in an ensemble
      2. 2.6.2 Management examples
      3. 2.6.3 Serviceability
    7. 2.7 Benefiting from a (r)evolutionay infrastructure
      1. 2.7.1 Workloads
      2. 2.7.2 Cloud computing
  6. Chapter 3. zEnterprise System hardware overview
    1. 3.1 zEnterprise CPC highlights, models, and upgrades
      1. 3.1.1 z196 highlights
      2. 3.1.2 z196 models
      3. 3.1.3 z114 highlights
      4. 3.1.4 z114 models
    2. 3.2 The frames
      1. 3.2.1 z196 frames
      2. 3.2.2 z114 frame
    3. 3.3 z196 processor cage, books, and MCM
    4. 3.4 z114 processor drawer and SCM
    5. 3.5 Processor chip
    6. 3.6 Processor unit
    7. 3.7 Memory
      1. 3.7.1 Concurrent memory upgrade
      2. 3.7.2 Redundant array of independent memory
      3. 3.7.3 Hardware system area
    8. 3.8 I/O system structure
    9. 3.9 I/O features
      1. 3.9.1 ESCON
      2. 3.9.2 FICON Express8S
      3. 3.9.3 FICON Express8
      4. 3.9.4 FICON Express4
      5. 3.9.5 OSA-Express4S
      6. 3.9.6 OSA-Express3
      7. 3.9.7 OSA-Express2
      8. 3.9.8 Coupling links
    10. 3.10 Cryptographic functions
      1. 3.10.1 CP Assist for Cryptographic Function
      2. 3.10.2 Crypto Express3 feature
      3. 3.10.3 Trusted key entry workstation
    11. 3.11 Coupling and clustering
      1. 3.11.1 ISC-3
      2. 3.11.2 Internal Coupling (IC)
      3. 3.11.3 InfiniBand coupling links
      4. 3.11.4 Coupling Facility Control Code (CFCC) Level 17
    12. 3.12 Time functions
      1. 3.12.1 Pulse Per Second
      2. 3.12.2 Server Time Protocol (STP)
      3. 3.12.3 Network Time Protocol (NTP) support
      4. 3.12.4 Time coordination for zBX components
    13. 3.13 HMC and SE
    14. 3.14 Power and cooling
    15. 3.15 zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension
  7. Chapter 4. Key functions and capabilities of the zEnterprise System
    1. 4.1 Virtualization
      1. 4.1.1 zEnterprise CPCs hardware virtualization
      2. 4.1.2 zEnterprise CPCs software virtualization
    2. 4.2 zEnterprise CPC technology improvements
      1. 4.2.1 Microprocessor
      2. 4.2.2 Capacity settings
      3. 4.2.3 Memory
      4. 4.2.4 I/O capabilities
    3. 4.3 Hardware Management Console functions
      1. 4.3.1 HMC enhancements
      2. 4.3.2 Considerations for multiple HMCs
    4. 4.4 zEnterprise CPC common time functions
      1. 4.4.1 Server time protocol (STP)
      2. 4.4.2 Network time protocol (NTP) client support
    5. 4.5 zEnterprise CPC Power functions
      1. 4.5.1 High voltage DC power
      2. 4.5.2 Internal Battery Feature (IBF)
      3. 4.5.3 Power capping and power saving
      4. 4.5.4 Power estimation tool
      5. 4.5.5 z196 Hybrid cooling system
      6. 4.5.6 z196 Water cooling
      7. 4.5.7 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
    6. 4.6 zEnterprise CPC Capacity on Demand (CoD)
      1. 4.6.1 Permanent upgrades
      2. 4.6.2 Temporary upgrades
      3. 4.6.3 z/OS capacity provisioning
    7. 4.7 Throughput optimization with zEnterprise CPC
    8. 4.8 zEnterprise CPC performance
    9. 4.9 zEnterprise BladeCenter Extension
      1. 4.9.1 IBM blades
      2. 4.9.2 IBM Smart Analytics Optimizer solution
    10. 4.10 Reliability, availability, and serviceability (RAS)
      1. 4.10.1 RAS capability for the HMC
      2. 4.10.2 RAS capability for zBX
    11. 4.11 High availability technology for zEnterprise
      1. 4.11.1 High availability for zEnterprise CPC with Parallel Sysplex
      2. 4.11.2 PowerHA in zBX environment
  8. Appendix A. Operating systems support and considerations
    1. Software support summary
    2. Support by operating system
    3. Software support for zBX
    4. References
    5. z/OS considerations
    6. Coupling Facility and CFCC considerations
    7. IOCP considerations
    8. ICKDSF considerations
  9. Appendix B. Software licensing
    1. Software licensing considerations
  10. Appendix C. Channel options
  11. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications
    2. Online resources
    3. Other publications
    4. How to get IBM Redbooks publications
    5. Help from IBM
  12. Back cover