You are previewing IBM WebSphere® Application Server for Distributed Platforms and z/OS®: An Administrator’s Guide.
O'Reilly logo
IBM WebSphere® Application Server for Distributed Platforms and z/OS®: An Administrator’s Guide

Book Description

In this book, IBM's own enterprise WebSphere experts offer authoritative, comprehensive guidance for deploying and managing WebSphere on z/OS for mainframes, UNIX®/Linux®-based distributed systems, and Windows® servers. Drawing on their extensive experience supporting enterprise customers and developing new WebSphere technologies, the authors address the entire management lifecycle: planning, installation, configuration, administration, application deployment, tuning, and troubleshooting.

This book thoroughly covers WebSphere Application Server Version 5.0 and 5.1: both IBM Base WebSphere Application Server offerings and the advanced scalability and failover capabilities built into the popular IBM Network Deployment Edition. It has been designed to serve both as a comprehensive learning tool and as a rapid reference for working professionals.

Coverage includes

  • The WebSphere Application Server architecture: a detailed introduction for working administrators

  • Installation and configuration on both distributed and z/OS platforms, from planning through security

  • Assembling, deploying, and securing applications with the Application Assembly Tool and Assembly Toolkit

  • Managing WebSphere Application Server, including clustering and workload management

  • Automating administrative tasks using the powerful WebSphere scripting tools

  • Performance monitoring/tuning using both WebSphere- and system-level tools, including real-world tuning scenarios

  • A start-to-finish methodology for WebSphere troubleshooting

  • Covering z/OS, UNIX, Linux, and Windows platforms

  • Learn all you need to know from IBM's own WebSphere development and advanced deployment teams

  • Includes the latest most thorough coverage WebSphere V5.0/5.1

  • © Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

    Table of Contents

    1. Copyright
      1. Dedications
    2. IBM Press
      1. WebSphere Books
      2. On Demand Computing Books
      3. More Books from IBM Press
      4. DB2 Books
    3. Foreword
    4. Acknowledgments
    5. 1. WebSphere Environment Overview
      1. 1. Introduction
        1. 1.1. About This Book
        2. 1.2. Conventions Used In This Book
      2. 2. Compare and Contrast: WebSphere on z/OS and the Distributed Platforms
        1. Objectives
        2. 2.1. Supported Platforms
        3. 2.2. Differences Between z/OS and the Distributed Operating Systems
        4. 2.3. z/OS Quality of Service Features
        5. 2.4. WebSphere on the Distributed Platforms and z/OS
        6. 2.5. Summary
      3. 3. WebSphere Architecture and Design
        1. Objectives
        2. 3.1. Introduction
        3. 3.2. Product Packaging
        4. 3.3. Network Deployment (ND) Architecture
          1. 3.3.1. Network Deployment and Base Core Concepts
          2. 3.3.2. Server Process
          3. 3.3.3. Node and Node Agent
          4. 3.3.4. Cell and Deployment Manager
        5. 3.4. WebSphere Components
          1. 3.4.1. Web Container
          2. 3.4.2. EJB Container
          3. 3.4.3. JCA Service
          4. 3.4.4. JTA/JTS Service
          5. 3.4.5. JDBC and Connection Pooling
          6. 3.4.6. JMS Service
          7. 3.4.7. Naming Service
          8. 3.4.8. Security Service
          9. 3.4.9. Administrative Service
          10. 3.4.10. Configuration Repository
          11. 3.4.11. Administrative Tools
          12. 3.4.12. Enterprise Applications
          13. 3.4.13. Web Services
          14. 3.4.14. JavaMail Service
          15. 3.4.15. Application Client Container
          16. 3.4.16. HTTP Server Plug-in
          17. 3.4.17. Distributed Management Model
          18. 3.4.18. Clustering
        6. 3.5. ND Architectural Considerations for z/OS Platform
          1. 3.5.1. The Address Space
          2. 3.5.2. The Minimum
          3. 3.5.3. The Server
          4. 3.5.4. The Node
          5. 3.5.5. The Cell
          6. 3.5.6. The Cluster
        7. 3.6. Summary
      4. 4. WebSphere Topology: Distributed and z/OS
        1. Objectives
        2. 4.1. Overview
        3. 4.2. Choosing a Topology
          1. 4.2.1. Topology Planning Considerations
            1. 4.2.1.1. Security
            2. 4.2.1.2. Cost
            3. 4.2.1.3. Administration
            4. 4.2.1.4. Performance
            5. 4.2.1.5. Availability
            6. 4.2.1.6. Scalability
            7. 4.2.1.7. Session State
            8. 4.2.1.8. Planning Considerations Summary
        4. 4.3. Topology Examples
          1. 4.3.1. Single Server Topology
        5. 4.4. Three-Tier Topology
        6. 4.5. MultiTier and MultiCell Topology (Gold Standard—99.999%)
        7. 4.6. Mixed Server Topology
        8. 4.7. Topology Planning for z/OS
          1. 4.7.1. The Configurations on z/OS
          2. 4.7.2. Monoplex
          3. 4.7.3. Single System with Every Tester Having Their Own Base Cell, Node, and Application Server
          4. 4.7.4. Single System, Single Base Cell, Single Node with Multiple Application Servers
          5. 4.7.5. Single System, Deployment Manager Cell, Any Combination of Node, Server, Cluster
          6. 4.7.6. The Deployment Manager Node (Also Called a Network Deployment Installation)
          7. 4.7.7. The Node Agent
          8. 4.7.8. Sysplex
          9. 4.7.9. Other Topology Considerations—Coexisting Installations
        9. 4.8. Summary
      5. 5. WebSphere Installation—Distributed
        1. Objectives
        2. 5.1. Overview
        3. 5.2. Installation Considerations
          1. 5.2.1. Administration
          2. 5.2.2. Security
          3. 5.2.3. Performance
          4. 5.2.4. Software Prerequisites
          5. 5.2.5. Hardware Prerequisites
        4. 5.3. Migrating to WebSphere V5.0
          1. 5.3.1. A Big Jump from WebSphere V3.5 to WebSphere V5.0
          2. 5.3.2. A Small Hop from WebSphere V4.0 to WebSphere V5
        5. 5.4. Installation of WebSphere Application Server V5
          1. 5.4.1. Installation with the Graphical Installer
          2. 5.4.2. Installation with the Silent Installer
        6. 5.5. WebSphere Installation on Linux Example
          1. 5.5.1. WebSphere Application Server Base Edition Installation
          2. 5.5.2. WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment Edition Installation
          3. 5.5.3. Additional Recommended Steps
          4. 5.5.4. Installing an Interim Fix and Fix Pack on WebSphere
        7. 5.6. Summary
      6. 6. WebSphere Installation—z/OS
        1. Objectives
        2. 6.1. Preinstallation Considerations
          1. 6.1.1. Administration
          2. 6.1.2. Security
          3. 6.1.3. Performance
          4. 6.1.4. Software Prerequisites
          5. 6.1.5. Hardware Prerequisites
          6. 6.1.6. Migrating to WebSphere 5.0
          7. 6.1.7. A Big Jump from WebSphere V3.5 to WebSphere V5.0
          8. 6.1.8. A Small Hop from WebSphere V4.01 to WebSphere V5.0
        3. 6.2. Installation
          1. 6.2.1. SMP/e Overview
            1. 6.2.1.1. HFS
            2. 6.2.1.2. Link Editing Review
            3. 6.2.1.3. SMP/e
        4. 6.3. The Customization Process
          1. 6.3.1. The ISPF Panels
            1. 6.3.1.1. Invoke the Panels from ISPF Option 6
            2. 6.3.1.2. Navigate Past the Splash Screen and License Information
            3. 6.3.1.3. Choose Which of the Four Configuration Options You Want to Setup
            4. 6.3.1.4. Configure Base Application Server Node
            5. 6.3.1.5. A Base Configuration
          2. 6.3.2. Allocate Target Data Sets
          3. 6.3.3. Define WebSphere Variables
          4. 6.3.4. Generate Customization Jobs
          5. 6.3.5. Download the Directions to Your Workstation
          6. 6.3.6. Save Variables
            1. 6.3.6.1. Download the Generated Directions and follow them to create a WebSphere V5.0 Base
          7. 6.3.7. Directions to Create a WebSphere V5.0 Base
          8. 6.3.8. Manual System Changes
          9. 6.3.9. Starting the Base Environment
            1. 6.3.9.1. The Initial Verification Test
        5. 6.4. Logging into the Base Administration Console
        6. 6.5. Deployment Manager Node
          1. 6.5.1. A Network Deployment Configuration
          2. 6.5.2. Allocate Target Data Sets for the Deployment Manager Node
            1. 6.5.2.1. Define Variables for the Deployment Manager Node
            2. 6.5.2.2. Download the Generated Directions and Follow Them to Create a WebSphere Deployment Manager
            3. 6.5.2.3. Manual System Changes
          3. 6.5.3. Jobs and Started Procedures That Make Configuration Changes
            1. 6.5.3.1. Update the Application Server’s WLM Application Environment
          4. 6.5.4. Start the Node Agent Server
          5. 6.5.5. Start the Application Server
          6. 6.5.6. Logging into the Network Deployment Administrative Console
        7. 6.6. Summary
      7. 7. Getting Started with WebSphere—An Overview
        1. Objectives
        2. 7.1. A Basic WebSphere System
          1. 7.1.1. First Steps
        3. 7.2. The WebSphere Administrative Console
        4. 7.3. WebSphere Directory Structure on Distributed
        5. 7.4. WebSphere Directory Structure on z/OS
          1. 7.4.1. WebSphere Directory Structure in USS
            1. 7.4.1.1. The WebSphere read/write configuration directory in USS
            2. 7.4.1.2. The WebSphere read/only product directory in USS
          2. 7.4.2. WebSphere Directory Structure in MVS
        6. 7.5. Starting and Stopping WebSphere
        7. 7.6. Tools Installed with WebSphere
          1. 7.6.1. Tools for Installing and Upgrading
            1. 7.6.1.1. ClientUpgrade DistributedOnly
            2. 7.6.1.2. WasPreUpgrade DistributedOnly
            3. 7.6.1.3. WasPostUpgrade DistributedOnly
          2. 7.6.2. Tools for Assembling and Deploying Applications
            1. 7.6.2.1. Application Assembly Tool (AAT)
            2. 7.6.2.2. Assembly Toolkit (ATK)
            3. 7.6.2.3. Ejbdeploy Tool
            4. 7.6.2.4. Application Client Resource Configuration Tool
          3. 7.6.3. Administration Tools
            1. 7.6.3.1. BackupConfig Tool
            2. 7.6.3.2. RestoreConfig Tool
            3. 7.6.3.3. VersionInfo
            4. 7.6.3.4. Administrative Scripting Tool
            5. 7.6.3.5. XML-SOAP Administrative Tool
            6. 7.6.3.6. UDDI User Console
            7. 7.6.3.7. dumpNameSpace Tool
          4. 7.6.4. Tools for Monitoring and Tuning
            1. 7.6.4.1. Monitoring through the WebSphere Administrative Console
            2. 7.6.4.2. Tivoli Performance Viewer
          5. 7.6.5. Tools for Problem Determination
            1. 7.6.5.1. Log Analyzer
            2. 7.6.5.2. Collector Tool DistributedOnly
            3. 7.6.5.3. Showlog Tool DistributedOnly
        8. 7.7. Summary
    6. 2. WebSphere Configuration
      1. 8. Configuring WebSphere Application Server
        1. Objectives
        2. 8.1. Creating and Configuring Application Servers
          1. 8.1.1. Creating an Application Server
          2. 8.1.2. Templates
          3. 8.1.3. Configuring Application Servers
            1. 8.1.3.1. Web Container Configuration
              1. General Properties
              2. Additional Properties
                1. HTTP Transports
                2. Thread Pool
              3. Custom Properties
              4. EJB Container
          4. 8.1.4. ORB Service Configuration
          5. 8.1.5. Transaction Service
        3. 8.2. Creating and Configuring WebSphere Data Sources and JDBC Providers
          1. 8.2.1. WebSphere Data Sources (Version 4)
          2. 8.2.2. WebSphere Data Sources
          3. 8.2.3. Creating the Trade 3 JDBC Provider and Data Source
            1. 8.2.3.1. Creating the Trade 3 DB2 JDBC Provider
            2. 8.2.3.2. Creating the Trade 3 Data Source
        4. 8.3. Configuring the WebSphere Environment
          1. 8.3.1. Configuring Virtual Hosts
          2. 8.3.2. Managing WebSphere Variables
        5. 8.4. Creating WebSphere Variables
        6. 8.5. Session Management
          1. 8.5.1. General Properties
          2. 8.5.2. Session Affinity
          3. 8.5.3. Session Persistence
            1. 8.5.3.1. Session Persistence via Database
              1. Enabling Session Persistence via Database
            2. 8.5.3.2. Session Persistence Using Memory-to-Memory Replication
              1. Client/Server Mode
              2. Peer to Peer Mode
              3. Enabling Session Persistence Using Memory-to-Memory Replication Domains
                1. Creating Replication Domains
                2. Enabling Memory-to-Memory Persistence
          4. 8.5.4. Database versus Memory-to-Memory Replication
            1. 8.5.4.1. Distributed Sessions Tuning Parameters
        7. 8.6. Summary
      2. 9. The WebSphere Naming Service
        1. Objectives
        2. 9.1. Naming Service Architecture
          1. 9.1.1. Namespace Partitions
          2. 9.1.2. Bootstrap Ports
          3. 9.1.3. Bindings in the Distributed Namespace
        3. 9.2. Interoperability
          1. 9.2.1. Clients Running on Previous Versions of WebSphere
          2. 9.2.2. Non-WebSphere Clients
          3. 9.2.3. Accessing Older WebSphere Servers from Version 5 Clients
        4. 9.3. Administratively Configured Bindings
        5. 9.4. The dumpNameSpace Tool
          1. 9.4.1. Syntax
            1. 9.4.1.1. Options
            2. 9.4.1.2. Example
        6. 9.5. Summary
      3. 10. The Web Server Plug-in
        1. Objectives
        2. 10.1. An Overview of the Web Server Plug-in
        3. 10.2. Installing the Web Server Plug-in
          1. 10.2.1. Preinstall Preparation
          2. 10.2.2. Installation Steps
          3. 10.2.3. Verifying the Installation
        4. 10.3. Basic Plug-in Configuration
          1. 10.3.1. The Plug-in Configuration File
            1. 10.3.1.1. Updating the Configuration File
            2. 10.3.1.2. Where to Put the Configuration File
          2. 10.3.2. Servers and Clusters
          3. 10.3.3. Configuring Virtual Hosts
          4. 10.3.4. Configuring URIs
        5. 10.4. Advanced Plug-in Configuration
          1. 10.4.1. Editing the Configuration File
          2. 10.4.2. Understanding Routes
          3. 10.4.3. Customizing Load Balancing Settings
            1. 10.4.3.1. The LoadBalance Attribute
            2. 10.4.3.2. Session Affinity
            3. 10.4.3.3. The LoadBalanceWeight Attribute
            4. 10.4.3.4. The MaxConnections Attribute
            5. 10.4.3.5. Primary and Backup Servers
        6. 10.5. Securing Communication Between the Plug-in and the Application Server
          1. 10.5.1. Creating Security Certificates with ikeyman
          2. 10.5.2. Creating a Secure Transport for the Web Container
          3. 10.5.3. Configuring the Plug-in to Use a Secure Transport
        7. 10.6. Tuning Plug-in Failover for Your Environment
          1. 10.6.1. About Plug-in Failover
            1. 10.6.1.1. RetryInterval
            2. 10.6.1.2. ConnectTimeout
            3. 10.6.1.3. MaxConnectBacklog
          2. 10.6.2. Considerations for Multiprocessed Web Servers
        8. 10.7. Web Server Plug-in Logging and Tracing
          1. 10.7.1. The Plug-in Log File
            1. 10.7.1.1. The Plug-in Log Format
        9. 10.8. Summary
      4. 11. The Java Message Service
        1. Objectives
        2. 11.1. Java Message Service
          1. 11.1.1. Queues
          2. 11.1.2. Topics
        3. 11.2. Overview WebSphere Application Server JMS Providers
          1. 11.2.1. The WebSphere JMS Provider
          2. 11.2.2. The WebSphere MQ JMS Provider
          3. 11.2.3. The Generic JMS Provider
          4. 11.2.4. JMS Web Services Support
        4. 11.3. JMS Topology—Base Installation versus Network Deployment
        5. 11.4. Managing a JMS Server
          1. 11.4.1. Configuring the Internal JMS Server
          2. 11.4.2. Configuring the Message Listener Service
          3. 11.4.3. Configuring Listener Ports
          4. 11.4.4. Configuring the Message Listener Service Thread Pool
          5. 11.4.5. Configuring a JMS Provider
            1. 11.4.5.1. JMS Provider Basics—Trade3 Example
            2. 11.4.5.2. WebSphere JMS Provider
            3. 11.4.5.3. Configuring Queues
            4. 11.4.5.4. Configuring Queue Connection Factories
            5. 11.4.5.5. Configuring Queue Destination
            6. 11.4.5.6. Configuring the Internal JMS Server Queues
            7. 11.4.5.7. Configuring Topics
            8. 11.4.5.8. Configuring Topic Connection Factories
            9. 11.4.5.9. Configuring Topic Destinations
          6. 11.4.6. Configuring WebSphere MQ JMS Provider
            1. 11.4.6.1. Configuring WebSphere MQ JMS Queues
            2. 11.4.6.2. Configuring WebSphere MQ Queue Connection Factories
            3. 11.4.6.3. Configuring WebSphere MQ Queue Destination
            4. 11.4.6.4. Configuring WebSphere MQ JMS Topics
            5. 11.4.6.5. Configuring WebSphere MQ Topic Connection Factories
            6. 11.4.6.6. Configuring WebSphere MQ Topic Destinations
          7. 11.4.7. Generic JMS Provider
            1. 11.4.7.1. Configuring Generic JMS Queues
            2. 11.4.7.2. Configuring Generic JMS Topics
            3. 11.4.7.3. Configuring Generic JMS Destinations
            4. 11.4.7.4. Configuring Generic JMS Connection Factories
        6. 11.5. JMS Provider Security
          1. 11.5.1. JMS Security Overview
            1. 11.5.1.1. WebSphere JMS Provider Authentication and Authorization
            2. 11.5.1.2. WebSphere MQ JMS Provider Authentication and Authorization
            3. 11.5.1.3. Generic JMS Provider Authentication and Authorization
        7. 11.6. Installing WebSphere MQ
        8. 11.7. Migrating from WebSphere Embedded Messaging to WebSphere MQ
        9. 11.8. Tuning JMS
        10. 11.9. WebSphere MQ Connection Pooling
        11. 11.10. Troubleshooting Tips for JMS
          1. 11.10.1. Tools for Troubleshooting
            1. 11.10.1.1. Internal JMS Server Tools
        12. 11.11. Configuring JMS on z/OS
          1. 11.11.1. The ISPF Panels
            1. 11.11.1.1. Invoke the Panels from ISPF Option 6
            2. 11.11.1.2. Navigate Past the Splash Screen and License Information
            3. 11.11.1.3. Choose Which of the Four Configuration Possibilities You Want to Setup
            4. 11.11.1.4. Allocate Target Data Sets
            5. 11.11.1.5. Allocate Target Data Sets
            6. 11.11.1.6. Define WebSphere Variables for the Integral JMS Provider
            7. 11.11.1.7. Download the Directions to Your Workstation
            8. 11.11.1.8. Save Variables
            9. 11.11.1.9. Download the Generated Directions and Follow Them to Create a WebSphere Base
              1. Manual System Changes
            10. 11.11.1.10. Stop the Application Server
            11. 11.11.1.11. Start the Application Server with Your Configured IJP
        13. 11.12. Summary
      5. 12. Web Services—An Overview
        1. Objectives
        2. 12.1. Web Services Overview
        3. 12.2. Support for Web Services in WebSphere V5
        4. 12.3. Web Services Implementation in WebSphere
        5. 12.4. Installing Web Services Components in WebSphere
          1. 12.4.1. Install WebSphere Network Deployment with Web Services Option
          2. 12.4.2. Setup Access to UDDI Registry
          3. 12.4.3. Install Web Services Gateway
        6. 12.5. Installing a Web Services Application
          1. 12.5.1. Making the Application SOAP Enabled
          2. 12.5.2. Installing a SOAPenabled EAR file
          3. 12.5.3. Configuring Namespace URI and WSDL URI
          4. 12.5.4. Deploying Channels
          5. 12.5.5. Deploying Filters
          6. 12.5.6. Deploying UDDI References
          7. 12.5.7. Deploying Services to the Gateway
        7. 12.6. The Customization Process for the Web Services Technology on z/OS
          1. 12.6.1. The Web Services Gateway (V5.0.2 or Newer on z/OS)
            1. 12.6.1.1. The ISPF Panels
            2. 12.6.1.2. Download the Web Services Development Kit and Install on Your Workstation
        8. 12.7. Summary
      6. 13. WebSphere Security on the Distributed Platforms
        1. Objectives
        2. 13.1. Securing Your WebSphere Environment
        3. 13.2. WebSphere Global Security Components Overview
        4. 13.3. WebSphere Security Administration
          1. 13.3.1. Global Security
          2. 13.3.2. Configuring a User Registry
            1. 13.3.2.1. Local OS
            2. 13.3.2.2. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)
            3. 13.3.2.3. Custom User Registry
          3. 13.3.3. Configuring Authentication Mechanisms
            1. 13.3.3.1. SWAM
            2. 13.3.3.2. LTPA
              1. Trust Association
              2. Single Signon (SSO)
          4. 13.3.4. Enabling Global Security
          5. 13.3.5. Configuring Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
          6. 13.3.6. Configure the Authentication Protocol
          7. 13.3.7. Configuring Java Authentication and Authorization Service
            1. 13.3.7.1. Configuring Application Logins
            2. 13.3.7.2. Configuring J2C Authentication Data
          8. 13.3.8. Override Global Security Configurations at the Server Level
          9. 13.3.9. Performance Considerations
          10. 13.3.10. Security-Related Configuration Files
        5. 13.4. Operational Considerations
          1. 13.4.1. Run WebSphere Using a Non-root User on UNIX Systems
          2. 13.4.2. File Permissions
          3. 13.4.3. Administrative Roles
          4. 13.4.4. Naming and Security
        6. 13.5. Trace Specifications for Security
          1. 13.5.1. Enabling Server Trace
          2. 13.5.2. Enabling Client Trace
        7. 13.6. Summary
      7. 14. WebSphere Security on the z/OS Platform
        1. Objectives
        2. 14.1. Configure z/OS Security for WebSphere
        3. 14.2. z/OS Security Concepts
          1. 14.2.1. System Authorization Facility (SAF)
          2. 14.2.2. Resource Access Control Facility (RACF)
          3. 14.2.3. z/OS UNIX Security
          4. 14.2.4. Started Tasks and User ID
        4. 14.3. Walkthrough of a Sample RACF Job for Configuring Security for WebSphere
          1. 14.3.1. Users/groups and Started Tasks
          2. 14.3.2. Profiles to Protect WebSphere on z/OS Infrastructure
          3. 14.3.3. Additional Permissions Required by WebSphere on z/OS
          4. 14.3.4. Consolidate Users and Profiles
          5. 14.3.5. SSL Setup
          6. 14.3.6. WebSphere 5.0.2
        5. 14.4. WebSphere on z/OS Security Administration
          1. 14.4.1. Local OS User Registry
          2. 14.4.2. Thread Identity and Synchronize to OS Thread
          3. 14.4.3. Use EJBROLE for Authorization
          4. 14.4.4. Use ICSF as Authentication Mechanism
          5. 14.4.5. Configure System SSL Repertoire
          6. 14.4.6. zSAS
        6. 14.5. Summary
    7. 3. Assembling and Deploying Applications in WebSphere
      1. 15. Assembling Applications in WebSphere
        1. Objectives
        2. 15.1. Introduction
        3. 15.2. J2EE Development Roles
          1. 15.2.1. J2EE Product Provider
          2. 15.2.2. Tool Provider
          3. 15.2.3. Application Component Provider
          4. 15.2.4. Application Assembler
          5. 15.2.5. Application Deployer
          6. 15.2.6. System Administrator
        4. 15.3. Application Assembly Considerations
        5. 15.4. What Is an EAR File?
        6. 15.5. Assembly Options
          1. 15.5.1. Application Assembly Tool
          2. 15.5.2. WebSphere Studio
          3. 15.5.3. Application Server Toolkit
          4. 15.5.4. Apache Ant
        7. 15.6. Packaging Considerations
          1. 15.6.1. Separating Static and Dynamic Web Content
          2. 15.6.2. IBM Extensions
            1. 15.6.2.1. Dynamic Caching
            2. 15.6.2.2. Servlet Reloading
            3. 15.6.2.3. EJB Caching
              1. Option A—Activate at “Once”, Load at “Activation”
              2. Option B—Activate at “Once”, Load at “Transaction”
              3. Option C—Activate at “Transaction”, Load at “Transaction”
            4. 15.6.2.4. Access Intent
            5. 15.6.2.5. JSP Precompilation
          3. 15.6.3. J2EE References
          4. 15.6.4. Deploying Common Code
            1. 15.6.4.1. Sharing Common Code at Run Time
            2. 15.6.4.2. Understanding Classloader and Module Visibility
              1. Classloader Isolation Policies
              2. Classloader Example
              3. Option 1
              4. Option 2
              5. Option 3
              6. Option 4
              7. Setting the Application Classloader Policy
              8. Setting the Web Application Classloader Policy
              9. Classloader Modes
              10. WebSphere Classloader Viewer
        8. 15.7. Configuring Application Security
        9. 15.8. J2EE 1.3 Application Assembly
          1. 15.8.1. Assembling an Application
          2. 15.8.2. Assembling Application Client Modules
          3. 15.8.3. Assembling Web Modules
          4. 15.8.4. Assembling EJB Modules
          5. 15.8.5. Putting It All Together—Assembling the Enterprise Archive (EAR)
        10. 15.9. Summary
      2. 16. Securing Applications in WebSphere
        1. Objectives
        2. 16.1. Securing Your Application
          1. 16.1.1. Declarative Security
          2. 16.1.2. Programmatic Security
          3. 16.1.3. Security and the Application Deployment Descriptor
          4. 16.1.4. Security Roles Used in This Chapter
        3. 16.2. Securing Web Applications
          1. 16.2.1. Configuring Web Module Security
            1. 16.2.1.1. Create Security Roles
            2. 16.2.1.2. Create Security Constraints
            3. 16.2.1.3. Security Role References
            4. 16.2.1.4. Run-As Role for Web Components
          2. 16.2.2. Securing EJB Applications
            1. 16.2.2.1. Introduction
            2. 16.2.2.2. Security Roles
            3. 16.2.2.3. Method Permissions
            4. 16.2.2.4. Security Role References
            5. 16.2.2.5. Run-As Role for EJB Components
            6. 16.2.2.6. EJB Type Level
            7. 16.2.2.7. Individual EJB Level
            8. 16.2.2.8. EJB Method Level
            9. 16.2.2.9. Defining Run-As Roles in the ATK
            10. 16.2.2.10. Bean Level
            11. 16.2.2.11. Method Level
            12. 16.2.2.12. Excludes List
          3. 16.2.3. Finalizing Your Application Security Configuration
            1. 16.2.3.1. Configuring Policy Files
            2. 16.2.3.2. Mapping Users and Groups to Roles
            3. 16.2.3.3. Mapping Users to Run-As Roles
          4. 16.2.4. Performance Considerations for Application Security
        4. 16.3. Summary
      3. 17. Deploying Applications in WebSphere
        1. Objectives
        2. 17.1. Planning for Application Deployment
          1. 17.1.1. Deployment Architecture
            1. 17.1.1.1. Single/Multiple Applications per Application Server
            2. 17.1.1.2. WebSphere Classloaders
            3. 17.1.1.3. Shared Sessions
            4. 17.1.1.4. Deploying Common Utility Jars
              1. Sharing Common Code at Runtime
            5. 17.1.1.5. Separating Web and EJB Modules to Different Application Servers
            6. 17.1.1.6. Deploying in a Clustered Environment
              1. Replication in a Clustered Environment
              2. Upgrades and Rollbacks in a Clustered Environment
          2. 17.1.2. Checklist Before Deploying Your Application
        3. 17.2. Deployment Tools
          1. 17.2.1. WebSphere Administrative Console
          2. 17.2.2. wsadmin
          3. 17.2.3. WebSphere Studio Application Developer
        4. 17.3. Installing an Application on WebSphere
          1. 17.3.1. Choosing a Module to Install
          2. 17.3.2. Generating Default Bindings
            1. 17.3.2.1. Prefixes
            2. 17.3.2.2. Override
            3. 17.3.2.3. EJB 1.1 CMP Bindings
            4. 17.3.2.4. Connection Factory Bindings
            5. 17.3.2.5. Virtual Host
            6. 17.3.2.6. Specific Bindings File
            7. 17.3.2.7. Steps for Trade3
          3. 17.3.3. Install New Application
            1. 17.3.3.1. Installation Step: Application Deployment Options
              1. Precompile JSPs
              2. Directory to Install Application
              3. Distribute Application
              4. Use Binary Configuration
              5. Deploy EJBs
              6. Create MBeans for Resources
              7. Enable Class Reloading
              8. Reload Interval in Seconds
              9. Deploy Web Services
              10. Steps for Trade3
            2. 17.3.3.2. Installation Step: EJBDeploy Options
              1. Steps for Trade3
            3. 17.3.3.3. Installation Step: Provide Listener Ports for Messaging Beans
              1. Steps for Trade3
            4. 17.3.3.4. Installation Step: Provide JNDI Names for Beans
              1. Steps for Trade3
            5. 17.3.3.5. Installation Step: Default DataSource Mapping for CMP EJB 2.0
              1. Steps for Trade3
            6. 17.3.3.6. Installation Step: Map Data Sources for all 2.0 CMP beans
              1. Steps for Trade3
            7. 17.3.3.7. Installation Step: Provide Default Data Source Mapping for Modules Containing 1.x Entity Beans
              1. Steps for Trade3
            8. 17.3.3.8. Installation Step: Map Data Sources for All 1.x CMP
            9. 17.3.3.9. Installation Step: Map EJB References
              1. Steps for Trade3
            10. 17.3.3.10. Installation Step: Map Resource References to Resources
              1. Steps for Trade3
            11. 17.3.3.11. Installation Step: Map Resource Env References to Resources
              1. Steps for Trade3
            12. 17.3.3.12. Installation Step: Map Virtual Hosts for Web Modules
              1. Steps for Trade3
            13. 17.3.3.13. Installation Step: Map Modules to Application Servers
              1. Steps for Trade3
            14. 17.3.3.14. Installation Step: Map Security Roles to Users/Groups
              1. Steps for Trade3
            15. 17.3.3.15. Installation Step: Replacing RunAs System to RunAs Roles
              1. Steps for Trade3
            16. 17.3.3.16. Installation Step: Map RunAs Roles to Users
              1. Steps for Trade3
            17. 17.3.3.17. Installation Step: Ensure All Unprotected 1.x Methods Have the Correct Level of Protection
              1. Steps for Trade3
            18. 17.3.3.18. Installation Step: Ensure All Unprotected 2.0 Methods Have the Correct Level of Protection
              1. Steps for Trade3
            19. 17.3.3.19. Steps for Trade3
            20. 17.3.3.20. Installation Step: Summary
              1. Steps for Trade3
        5. 17.4. Postinstallation Deployment Options
          1. 17.4.1. Postinstallation Application Environment Setup
            1. 17.4.1.1. Configuring Shared Libraries
              1. Scope of the Shared Library
            2. 17.4.1.2. Regenerating the Web Server Plug-in Configuration
            3. 17.4.1.3. Exporting the EAR and DDLs
            4. 17.4.1.4. Configuring Startup Behavior
              1. Disabling Automatic Application Startup
              2. Application and Application Module Starting Weights
          2. 17.4.2. Testing the Application After Installation
          3. 17.4.3. Updating an Application
            1. 17.4.3.1. Altering the Application Configuration After Installation
            2. 17.4.3.2. Updating (Reinstalling) the Application Binaries
            3. 17.4.3.3. Hot Deployment and Dynamic Reloading
          4. 17.4.4. Uninstalling an Application
        6. 17.5. Summary
    8. 4. WebSphere Management
      1. 18. Workload Management Overview: Distributed
        1. Objectives
        2. 18.1. Overview
        3. 18.2. Understanding Clusters and Workload Management
          1. 18.2.1. Types of Clusters
            1. 18.2.1.1. Vertical Clusters
            2. 18.2.1.2. Horizontal Clusters
          2. 18.2.2. Advantages of Using Clusters
          3. 18.2.3. Disadvantages of Using Clusters
          4. 18.2.4. Understanding WebSphere Workload Management
            1. 18.2.4.1. HTTP Client vs. EJB Client Workload Management
            2. 18.2.4.2. The EJB Lookup and Creation Process
            3. 18.2.4.3. The EJB Request Distribution Process
            4. 18.2.4.4. Overriding the Default EJB Request Distribution Process
            5. 18.2.4.5. From Understanding to Application
          5. 18.2.5. Cluster and Cluster Member Administration
          6. 18.2.6. Cluster and Cluster Member Creation
          7. 18.2.7. Cluster Configuration
          8. 18.2.8. Cluster Runtime Controls
          9. 18.2.9. Cluster Tuning
          10. 18.2.10. Cluster Troubleshooting
        4. 18.3. EJB Workload Management Administration
          1. 18.3.1. EJB Workload Management Configuration
          2. 18.3.2. EJB Workload Management Tuning
          3. 18.3.3. EJB Workload Management Troubleshooting
        5. 18.4. Summary
      2. 19. Workload Management Overview: z/OS
        1. Objectives
        2. 19.1. Introduction
        3. 19.2. The Purpose of Workload Management on z/OS
        4. 19.3. How WebSphere Affects Your WLM Strategy
        5. 19.4. The Elements of a WLM Policy
          1. 19.4.1. Service Definition
          2. 19.4.2. Service Policies
          3. 19.4.3. Workloads
            1. 19.4.3.1. Workloads Based on Subsystem
            2. 19.4.3.2. Workloads Based on Type of Business
            3. 19.4.3.3. User Defined Workloads
          4. 19.4.4. Service Classes
            1. 19.4.4.1. Base Goal within a Service Class
            2. 19.4.4.2. Average Response Time and Response Time with Percentile
            3. 19.4.4.3. Velocity Goals
            4. 19.4.4.4. Discretionary Goals
            5. 19.4.4.5. Duration, Importance, and Period Aging for Heterogeneous Work
          5. 19.4.5. Resource Groups
            1. 19.4.5.1. Classification Rules and Classification Groups
          6. 19.4.6. Application Environments
            1. 19.4.6.1. Report Classes
          7. 19.4.7. Coefficient
          8. 19.4.8. Bringing It All Together
            1. 19.4.8.1. Containers for the WLM Policy
            2. 19.4.8.2. Address Space and Application Environment Definitions
            3. 19.4.8.3. Segregated Reporting of Data
            4. 19.4.8.4. Other Items to Segregate
            5. 19.4.8.5. Service Classes
            6. 19.4.8.6. Coefficients
        6. 19.5. Summary
      3. 20. Automated WebSphere Administration
        1. Objectives
        2. 20.1. Overview
          1. 20.1.1. Why Should You Automate Your Environment?
          2. 20.1.2. Automation Capabilities of WebSphere V5
          3. 20.1.3. Installation Response Files
          4. 20.1.4. Creating an Installation Response File
          5. 20.1.5. Shell Scripts
          6. 20.1.6. Effectively Using Command Line Scripts
          7. 20.1.7. WebSphere Ant Tasks
          8. 20.1.8. Java Management eXtentions (JMX)
          9. 20.1.9. An Example JMX Client
          10. 20.1.10. Wsadmin
            1. 20.1.10.1. Using Wsadmin Interactively
          11. 20.1.11. Some Wsadmin and WebSphere Interaction Details
            1. 20.1.11.1. Debugging Wsadmin Scripts
        3. 20.2. Real World Solutions—Putting It All Together
        4. 20.3. Summary
    9. 5. WebSphere Performance
      1. 21. Monitoring WebSphere Performance
        1. Objectives
        2. 21.1. What Should Be Monitored
          1. 21.1.1. Three Views of the Environment
            1. 21.1.1.1. End User View
            2. 21.1.1.2. System View
            3. Application View
        3. 21.2. Performance Monitoring Technologies in WebSphere
          1. 21.2.1. Performance Monitoring Infrastructure
          2. 21.2.2. PMI Request Metrics
          3. 21.2.3. Java Virtual Machine Profiler Interface
        4. 21.3. How to Monitor
          1. 21.3.1. Introduction to Tivoli Performance Viewer
          2. 21.3.2. Monitoring the End User View
            1. 21.3.2.1. End User View Monitoring Tools
              1. IBM Tivoli Monitoring for Transaction Performance V5.2
              2. Mercury Topaz Real User Monitor
          3. 21.3.3. Monitoring the System View
            1. 21.3.3.1. Core System Performance
              1. Windows
              2. CPU Usage Monitoring
              3. DISK Utilization Monitoring
              4. Memory Usage Monitoring
              5. UNIX/Linux
            2. 21.3.3.2. Application Performance
              1. Monitoring Servlets
              2. Monitoring EJBs
              3. Monitoring Sessions
              4. Request Flow
              5. Web Server
              6. Web Container and Database
            3. 21.3.3.3. WebSphere Health
            4. 21.3.3.4. Other System View Monitoring Tools
          4. 21.3.4. Monitoring the Application View
            1. 21.3.4.1. Application View Monitoring Tools
              1. IBM Tivoli Monitoring for Transaction Performance V5.2
              2. Veritas Indepth for J2EE
              3. Wily 4
        5. 21.4. Summary
      2. 22. WebSphere Performance Tuning
        1. Objectives
        2. 22.1. Introduction
        3. 22.2. Types of Performance Tuning
          1. 22.2.1. Application Tuning
        4. 22.3. WebSphere Performance Tuning
          1. 22.3.1. WebSphere System Queues
            1. 22.3.1.1. Queue Types
        5. 22.4. Tuning the Application Server
          1. 22.4.1. Hardware
            1. 22.4.1.1. Disk Speed
            2. 22.4.1.2. System Memory
            3. 22.4.1.3. Networks
          2. 22.4.2. Operating System TCP Settings
            1. 22.4.2.1. Microsoft Windows
            2. 22.4.2.2. Sun Solaris
            3. 22.4.2.3. IBM AIX
            4. 22.4.2.4. HP-UX
          3. 22.4.3. Java Virtual Machine (JVM)
            1. 22.4.3.1. General JVM Tuning
              1. Initial Heap Size
              2. Maximum Heap Size
              3. Optional Command Line Arguments
            2. 22.4.3.2. Making Changes to Generic JVM Settings
            3. 22.4.3.3. JVM Platform Specific Settings
              1. IBM JVM
              2. HP JVM
              3. Solaris JVM
          4. 22.4.4. Java Message Service (JMS)
            1. 22.4.4.1. Message Listener Service Thread Pool
            2. 22.4.4.2. Maximum Sessions
            3. 22.4.4.3. Maximum Messages
            4. 22.4.4.4. Configuring JMS Settings
          5. 22.4.5. WebSphere ORB
            1. 22.4.5.1. Pass by Reference
            2. 22.4.5.2. ORB Thread Pool
              1. Minimum and Maximum Thread Pool
              2. Request Timeout
            3. 22.4.5.3. Making Changes to ORB Settings
            4. 22.4.5.4. WebSphere Dynamic Caching
            5. 22.4.5.5. Enabling Dynamic Caching
          6. 22.4.6. EJB Container
            1. 22.4.6.1. Cleanup Interval
            2. 22.4.6.2. Cache Size
            3. 22.4.6.3. Adjusting EJB Container Settings
          7. 22.4.7. Web Container
            1. 22.4.7.1. Minimum and Maximum Threads
            2. 22.4.7.2. Is-Growable Option
          8. 22.4.8. Adjusting Web Container Thread Pool Settings
          9. 22.4.9. HTTP Transport Custom Properties
            1. 22.4.9.1. KeepAliveEnabled
            2. 22.4.9.2. MaxKeepAliveConnections
            3. 22.4.9.3. MaxKeepAliveRequests
            4. 22.4.9.4. Setting Custom HTTP Transport Properties
          10. 22.4.10. Database Connection Pooling
            1. 22.4.10.1. Maximum Pool Size
            2. 22.4.10.2. Minimum Pool Size
            3. 22.4.10.3. Prepared Statement Cache Size
            4. 22.4.10.4. Setting Data Source Properties
        6. 22.5. Summary
      3. 23. WebSphere Performance Tuning—z/OS
        1. Objectives
        2. 23.1. Overview
          1. 23.1.1. Problem versus Perception and z/OS Resources
        3. 23.2. Repeatable Performance Scenarios
          1. 23.2.1. Test System
          2. 23.2.2. Test Tools
            1. 23.2.2.1. Scripts
            2. 23.2.2.2. Restoring the Data for Each Test
          3. 23.2.3. Simplification of Scenario
        4. 23.3. Relevance of z/OS and Subsystems
          1. 23.3.1. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)
          2. 23.3.2. UNIX System Services (USS)
          3. 23.3.3. Resource Recovery Services (RRS)
          4. 23.3.4. Cross-System Coupling Facility (XCF)
          5. 23.3.5. Workload Manager (WLM)
          6. 23.3.6. Miscellaneous Considerations
        5. 23.4. The Container
          1. 23.4.1. Topology
          2. 23.4.2. Run Time Settings in the Controller
        6. 23.5. The Java Virtual Machine (JVM)
          1. 23.5.1. Garbage Collection
            1. 23.5.1.1. Understanding verboseGC Output
            2. 23.5.1.2. Soft References
            3. 23.5.1.3. Memory Leaks
              1. Heap Settings
          2. 23.5.2. Just In Time (JIT) Compiler
          3. 23.5.3. Java Tracing
          4. 23.5.4. Java Stack Traces
        7. 23.6. Administration and Monitoring
          1. 23.6.1. First, Read the Manual
          2. 23.6.2. RMF and WLM Overview
          3. 23.6.3. WebSphere and WLM Classification
            1. 23.6.3.1. Basic WLM Considerations
            2. 23.6.3.2. Classifying Work into Enclaves
              1. Routing WebSphere URLs to Specific Service Classes
            3. 23.6.3.3. Classifying Nonenclave Work
              1. Handling the Servant Address Spaces and Threads
            4. 23.6.3.4. RMF Considerations
            5. 23.6.3.5. RMF Reports
              1. Summary Report
              2. Partition Data Report
              3. CPU Activity
              4. Workload Activity
          4. 23.6.4. DB2
            1. 23.6.4.1. JDBC Tracing and Reduction
          5. 23.6.5. DB2 Tracing
            1. 23.6.5.1. System Parameter Report
            2. 23.6.5.2. Statistics Reports
            3. 23.6.5.3. Accounting Reports
        8. 23.7. HTTP Front-End Handlers for WebSphere
          1. 23.7.1. Browser/Workload Direct to Controller HTTP/HTTPS Transport
          2. 23.7.2. z/OS IHS HTTP/HTTPS Plug-in Forwarding
          3. 23.7.3. Distributed HTTP/HTTPS Plug-in Forwarding
          4. 23.7.4. WebSphere Edge Components
          5. 23.7.5. Note About Sysplex Distributor
        9. 23.8. Cookbook Approach to Problem Resolution
          1. 23.8.1. Nonintrusive Procedures
          2. 23.8.2. Intrusive Procedures
        10. 23.9. Summary
    10. 6. Troubleshooting WebSphere
      1. 24. WebSphere Problem Determination Tools—Logging and Tracing
        1. 24.1. WebSphere Log Files
          1. 24.1.1. JVM Logs
            1. 24.1.1.1. Configuring the JVM Log Files
            2. 24.1.1.2. Viewing the JVM Log Files
          2. 24.1.2. Process Logs
            1. 24.1.2.1. Configuring the Process Log Files
            2. 24.1.2.2. Viewing the Process Log Files
          3. 24.1.3. Service Logs
            1. 24.1.3.1. Configuring the Service Log
            2. 24.1.3.2. Viewing the Service Log
            3. 24.1.3.3. Specialty Logs
            4. 24.1.3.4. Installation Logs
            5. 24.1.3.5. Update Logs
            6. 24.1.3.6. Web Server Plug-in Logs
            7. 24.1.3.7. Embedded HTTP Server Logs
              1. Enabling the Access Log File
              2. Enabling the Error Log File
              3. Disabling the Access and Error Files
            8. 24.1.3.8. Utility Logs
        2. 24.2. Enabling and Configuring Tracing
          1. 24.2.1. Configuring Tracing from the Administrative Console
          2. 24.2.2. Tracing via XML Configuration File
          3. 24.2.3. Tracing the WebSphere Plug-in
        3. 24.3. Understanding WebSphere Log and Trace Files
          1. 24.3.1. Basic and Advanced Formats
          2. 24.3.2. Interpreting Messages
        4. 24.4. Using Log Analyzer
          1. 24.4.1. Running Log Analyzer
          2. 24.4.2. Analyzing Records against the Symptoms Database
          3. 24.4.3. Merging Multiple Log and Trace Files
        5. 24.5. First Failure Data Capture
        6. 24.6. Summary
      2. 25. Problem Prevention and Determination Methodology
        1. Objectives
        2. 25.1. Problem Prevention Best Practices
          1. 25.1.1. Testing Best Practices
            1. 25.1.1.1. Properly Scaled Tests
              1. What Does It Mean to Have a Scale Model of Production in Test?
              2. Benefits of a Scale Model
            2. 25.1.1.2. Isolated Test Environment
            3. 25.1.1.3. Test Scenarios
              1. Test Types
          2. 25.1.2. Change Control Best Practices
            1. 25.1.2.1. Restricting Administrative Privileges
            2. 25.1.2.2. Access History
            3. 25.1.2.3. Backing Up Your Configuration
            4. 25.1.2.4. Maintain a Log History
            5. 25.1.2.5. Documented Procedures
          3. 25.1.3. WebSphere Best Practices
            1. 25.1.3.1. Application Best Practices
            2. 25.1.3.2. Code Reviews
          4. 25.1.4. WebSphere Fix Packs and Interim Fixes
        3. 25.2. Problem Determination Methodology
          1. 25.2.1. Locating the Error in a Complex Environment
          2. 25.2.2. Could the Error Be Valid?
          3. 25.2.3. What Has Changed?
          4. 25.2.4. Simplify, Simplify, Simplify
            1. 25.2.4.1. The Simplest Test Scenario
            2. 25.2.4.2. The Simplest Application
            3. 25.2.4.3. The Simplest Environment
          5. 25.2.5. Do You Have Enough System Resources?
          6. 25.2.6. What to Do If the Problem Is in Production
          7. 25.2.7. Where to Go for Help
        4. 25.3. Working with IBM WebSphere Support
          1. 25.3.1. When to Involve WebSphere Support
          2. 25.3.2. How to Open a PMR
          3. 25.3.3. What Information to Have Ready
          4. 25.3.4. What to Expect
        5. 25.4. Summary
      3. 26. WebSphere Problem Determination and Troubleshooting for z/OS
        1. Objectives
        2. 26.1. Problem Determination on zSeries
          1. 26.1.1. Loss of Control
          2. 26.1.2. The Absolute Need for Cooperation
          3. 26.1.3. An Efficient Configuration Cannot Compensate for Poorly Performing Applications
          4. 26.1.4. Separation of Roles in J2EE
        3. A Simple Habit That Will Save Days of Frustration
          1. This section was devoted to a single tip
        4. 26.2. Where to Look for Valuable Clues
          1. 26.2.1. Places That Are Defaults from Customization
          2. 26.2.2. WebSphere Address Space Output
          3. 26.2.3. The WebSphere for z/OS Error Log
          4. 26.2.4. The z/OS System Console or SDSF.LOG
          5. 26.2.5. RACF
          6. 26.2.6. Timeline of Events
          7. 26.2.7. Places That Will Need to Be Configured
            1. 26.2.7.1. JDBC Trace
            2. 26.2.7.2. JVM Trace and JVM Garbage Collection Trace
            3. 26.2.7.3. Tracing the WebSphere Run Time Written in Java
            4. 26.2.7.4. Tracing the WebSphere Run Time Written in C++ and PLX
        5. 26.3. Tracing and Logging Differences on zSeries
          1. 26.3.1. Locating and Understanding WebSphere Logs
            1. 26.3.1.1. JVM Logs
            2. 26.3.1.2. Process Logs
            3. 26.3.1.3. Startup Logs
            4. 26.3.1.4. Installation Logs
            5. 26.3.1.5. Base Customization Jobs
            6. 26.3.1.6. Network Deployment Customization Jobs
            7. 26.3.1.7. Integrated JMS Provider Customization Jobs
            8. 26.3.1.8. Federation Customization Jobs
            9. 26.3.1.9. Update Logs
            10. 26.3.1.10. Plug-in Logs
            11. 26.3.1.11. Web Server Logs
            12. 26.3.1.12. Table of Environment Variables
        6. 26.4. Summary
    11. 7. Appendices
      1. A. Trade3 Application
        1. A.1. About Trade3
          1. A.1.1. What is the Trade3 Application?
          2. A.1.2. Why the Trade3 Application?
        2. A.2. Trade3 Deployment Gotchas
        3. A.3. Running Trade3
        4. A.4. Trade3 Configuration
        5. A.5. Running Trade3 for Performance Analysis
        6. A.6. Downloading Trade3
      2. B. WebSphere Tooling Reference
        1. B.1. WebSphere Utilities (Distributed)
          1. B.1.1. Event Alerter for WebSphere Application Server
          2. B.1.2. Log and Trace Analyzer for Autonomic Computing
          3. B.1.3. MBeanInspector for WebSphere Application Server
          4. B.1.4. HeapRoots
          5. B.1.5. HeapWizard Java Heap Analyzer for Diagnosing Memory Leaks
          6. B.1.6. HTTPsnif
          7. B.1.7. ThreadAnalyzer (Technology Preview)
          8. B.1.8. Level Reporting Tool for the WebSphere Platform
        2. B.2. WebSphere Utilities (z/OS)
          1. B.2.1. SMF Browser for WebSphere Application Server for z/OS V5
          2. B.2.2. viascii
      3. C. WebSphere Plug-in Definitions
        1. C.1. The plugin-cfg.xml file
        2. C.2. The plugin-cfg.xml elements and attributes
          1. C.2.1. Config (exactly 1)
          2. C.2.2. IgnoreDNSFailures (0 or 1 for Each <Config>)
          3. C.2.3. Refresh Interval (0 or 1 for Each <Config>)
          4. C.2.4. ASDisableNagle (0 or 1 for Each <Config>)
          5. C.2.5. IISDisableNagle (0 or 1 for Each <Config>)
          6. C.2.7. ResponseChunkSize (0 or 1 for Each <Config>)
          7. C.2.8. Log (0 or 1 for Each <Config>)
          8. C.2.9. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <Log>)
          9. C.2.10. LogLevel (0 or 1 for Each <Log>)
          10. C.2.11. ServerCluster (0 or More Elements for Each <Config>)
          11. C.2.12. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          12. C.2.13. LoadBalance (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          13. C.2.14. RetryInterval (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          14. C.2.15. RemoveSpecialHeaders (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          15. C.2.16. CloneSeparatorChange (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          16. C.2.17. PostSizeLimit (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          17. C.2.18. Server (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          18. C.2.19. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <Server>)
          19. C.2.20. CloneID (0 or 1 for Each <Server>)
          20. C.2.21. WaitForContinue (0 or 1 for Each <Server>)
          21. C.2.22. LoadBalanceWeight (0 or 1 for Each <Server>)
          22. C.2.23. ConnectTimeout (0 or 1 for Each <Server>)
          23. C.2.24. ExtendedHandshake (0 or 1 for Each <Server>)
          24. C.2.25. Transport (0 or 1 for Each <Server>)
          25. C.2.26. Hostname (Exactly 1 for Each <Transport>)
            1. MaxConnections (Exactly 1 for Each <Transport>)
          26. C.2.27. Port (Exactly 1 for Each <Transport>)
          27. C.2.28. Protocol (Exactly 1 for Each <Transport>)
          28. C.2.29. Property (0 to Many for Each <Transport>)
          29. C.2.30. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <Property>)
          30. C.2.31. Value (Exactly 1 for Each <Property>)
          31. C.2.32. ClusterAddress (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          32. C.2.33. PrimaryServers (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          33. C.2.34. BackupServers (0 or 1 for Each <ServerCluster>)
          34. C.2.35. VirtualHostGroup (0 or More for Each <Config>)
          35. C.2.36. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <VirtualHostGroup>)
          36. C.2.37. VirtualHost (1 or More for Each <VirtualHost>)
          37. C.2.38. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <VirtualHost>)
          38. C.2.39. UriGroup (0 or More for Each <Config>)
          39. C.2.40. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <UriGroup>)
          40. C.2.41. Uri (1 or More for Each <UriGroup>)
          41. C.2.42. Name (Exactly 1 for Each <Uri>)
          42. C.2.43. AffinityCookie (0 or 1 for Each <Uri>)
          43. C.2.44. Route (1 or More for Each <Config>)
          44. C.2.45. VirtualHostGroup (0 or 1 for Each <Route>)
          45. C.2.46. UriGroup (0 or 1 for Each <Route>)
          46. C.2.47. ServerCluster (Exactly 1 for Each <Route>)
      4. D. WebSphere Message Component IDs
      5. E. Custom Strategy Bindings File DTD
        1. E.1. dfltbndngs.dtd
      6. F. Common z/OS Terms
      7. G. Comparison of Common Tasks on z/OS versus Distributed
        1. G.1. How Actions and Terms on z/OS Compare to Other Platforms
          1. G.1.1. Examples of Creating, Editing, Deleting, and Executing Files
            1. G.1.1.1. Windows
            2. G.1.1.2. Unix
            3. G.1.1.3. z/OS
              1. The Volume
              2. Data Set Organization
              3. SDSF.ST
              4. SDSF.DA
              5. SDSF.LOG
      8. H. z/Linux Considerations
        1. H.1. Structure and Benefits of z/Linux
        2. H.2. Best Practices with Configuration of z/Linux to Support WebSphere (Performance)
          1. H.2.1. GuestLan and Hipersockets
          2. H.2.2. Swap Devices and Memory
        3. H.3. Scaling of z/Linux with Respect to WebSphere Workloads
          1. H.3.1. Shared MiniDisks
          2. H.3.2. Scaling
      9. I. Automated WebSphere Administration Examples
        1. I.1. WebSphereJmxExample.java
        2. I.2. WebSphereAntExample.xml
        3. I.3. CreateCluster.jacl
        4. I.4. CreateJDBCResources.py
        5. I.5. CreateJMSResouces.jacl
    12. Bibliography