You are previewing IBM System Storage SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000 Best Practices and Performance Guidelines.
O'Reilly logo
IBM System Storage SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000 Best Practices and Performance Guidelines

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication captures several of the preferred practices that are based on field experience and describes the performance gains that can be achieved by implementing the IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller and Storwize® V7000 V7.2.

This book begins with a look at the latest developments with SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000 and reviews the changes in the previous versions of the product. It highlights configuration guidelines and preferred practices for the storage area network (SAN) topology, clustered system, back-end storage, storage pools and managed disks, volumes, remote copy services, and hosts. Then, this book provides performance guidelines for SAN Volume Controller, back-end storage, and applications. It explains how you can optimize disk performance with the IBM System Storage Easy Tier® function. Next, it provides preferred practices for monitoring, maintaining, and troubleshooting SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000. Finally, this book highlights several scenarios that demonstrate the preferred practices and performance guidelines.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. The team who wrote this book
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Summary of changes
    1. September 2014, Fourth Edition
  5. Part 1 Configuration guidelines and preferred practices
    1. Chapter 1. Updates in IBM System Storage SAN Volume Controller
      1. 1.1 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V5.1
      2. 1.2 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V6.1
      3. 1.3 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V6.2
      4. 1.4 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V6.3
      5. 1.5 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V6.4
      6. 1.6 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V7.1
      7. 1.7 Enhancements and changes in SAN Volume Controller V7.2
    2. Chapter 2. SAN topology
      1. 2.1 SAN topology of the SAN Volume Controller/Storwize
        1. 2.1.1 Redundancy
        2. 2.1.2 Topology basics
        3. 2.1.3 ISL oversubscription
        4. 2.1.4 Single switch SAN Volume Controller/Storwize SANs
        5. 2.1.5 Basic core-edge topology
        6. 2.1.6 Four-SAN, core-edge topology
        7. 2.1.7 Common topology issues
        8. 2.1.8 Stretched Cluster
        9. 2.1.9 Enhanced Stretched Cluster
      2. 2.2 SAN switches
        1. 2.2.1 Selecting SAN switch models
        2. 2.2.2 Switch port layout for large SAN edge switches
        3. 2.2.3 Switch port layout for director-class SAN switches
        4. 2.2.4 Virtual channels
        5. 2.2.5 IBM System Storage and IBM b-type SANs
        6. 2.2.6 IBM System Storage and Cisco SANs
        7. 2.2.7 SAN routing and duplicate worldwide node names
      3. 2.3 Zoning
        1. 2.3.1 Types of zoning
        2. 2.3.2 Prezoning tips and shortcuts
        3. 2.3.3 SAN Volume Controller internode communications zone
        4. 2.3.4 SAN Volume Controller/Storwize storage zones
        5. 2.3.5 SAN Volume Controller/Storwize host zones
        6. 2.3.6 Standard SAN Volume Controller/Storwize zoning configuration
        7. 2.3.7 Zoning with multiple SAN Volume Controller/Storwize clustered systems
        8. 2.3.8 Split storage subsystem configurations
      4. 2.4 Switch domain IDs
      5. 2.5 Distance extension for remote copy services
        1. 2.5.1 Optical multiplexors
        2. 2.5.2 Long-distance SFPs or XFPs
        3. 2.5.3 Fibre Channel over IP
        4. 2.5.4 Native IP replication with 7.2 SAN Volume Controller/Storwize code version
      6. 2.6 Tape and disk traffic that share the SAN
      7. 2.7 Switch interoperability
      8. 2.8 IBM Tivoli Storage Productivity Center
      9. 2.9 iSCSI support
        1. 2.9.1 iSCSI initiators and targets
        2. 2.9.2 iSCSI Ethernet configuration
        3. 2.9.3 Security and performance
        4. 2.9.4 Failover of port IP addresses and iSCSI names
        5. 2.9.5 iSCSI protocol limitations
      10. 2.10 SAS support
    3. Chapter 3. SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000 Cluster
      1. 3.1 Advantages of virtualization
        1. 3.1.1 SAN Volume Controller features
      2. 3.2 Scalability of SAN Volume Controller clustered systems
      3. 3.3 Scalability of Storwize V7000
        1. 3.3.1 Advantage of multiclustered systems versus single-clustered systems
        2. 3.3.2 Growing or splitting SAN Volume Controller clustered systems
        3. 3.3.3 Adding or upgrading SAN Volume Controller node hardware
      4. 3.4 Clustered system upgrade
    4. Chapter 4. Back-end storage
      1. 4.1 Controller affinity and preferred path
      2. 4.2 Round Robin Path Selection
      3. 4.3 Considerations for DS4000 and DS5000 series
        1. 4.3.1 Setting the DS4000 and DS5000 series so that both controllers have the same worldwide node name
        2. 4.3.2 Balancing workload across DS4000 and DS5000 series controllers
        3. 4.3.3 Ensuring path balance before MDisk discovery
        4. 4.3.4 Auto-Logical Drive Transfer for the DS4000 and DS5000 series (firmware version before 7.83.x)
        5. 4.3.5 Asymmetric Logical Unit Access for the DS4000 and DS5000 series (firmware 7.83.x and later)
        6. 4.3.6 Selecting array and cache parameters
        7. 4.3.7 Logical drive mapping
      4. 4.4 Considerations for DS8000 series
        1. 4.4.1 Balancing workload across DS8000 series controllers
        2. 4.4.2 DS8000 series ranks to extent pools mapping
        3. 4.4.3 Mixing array sizes within a storage pool
        4. 4.4.4 Determining the number of controller ports for the DS8000 series
        5. 4.4.5 LUN masking
        6. 4.4.6 WWPN to physical port translation
      5. 4.5 Considerations for IBM XIV Storage System
        1. 4.5.1 Cabling considerations
        2. 4.5.2 Host options and settings for XIV systems
        3. 4.5.3 Number and size of the Volumes
        4. 4.5.4 Restrictions
      6. 4.6 Considerations for IBM Storwize V7000/V5000/V3700
        1. 4.6.1 Cabling and zoning
        2. 4.6.2 Defining internal storage
        3. 4.6.3 Configuring Storwize storage systems
      7. 4.7 Considerations for IBM FlashSystem
        1. 4.7.1 Physical FC port connection and zoning
        2. 4.7.2 Logical configuration
        3. 4.7.3 Extent size and storage pools
        4. 4.7.4 Volumes
      8. 4.8 Considerations for third-party storage with EMC Symmetrix DMX and Hitachi Data Systems
      9. 4.9 Medium error logging
      10. 4.10 Mapping physical LBAs to volume extents
      11. 4.11 Identifying storage controller boundaries by using the IBM Tivoli Storage Productivity Center
    5. Chapter 5. Storage pools and managed disks
      1. 5.1 Availability considerations for storage pools
      2. 5.2 Selecting storage subsystems
      3. 5.3 Selecting the storage pool
        1. 5.3.1 Selecting the number of arrays per storage pool
        2. 5.3.2 Selecting LUN attributes
        3. 5.3.3 Considerations for Storwize family systems
        4. 5.3.4 Considerations for the IBM XIV Storage System
      4. 5.4 Quorum disk considerations
      5. 5.5 Tiered storage
      6. 5.6 Adding MDisks to existing storage pools
        1. 5.6.1 Checking access to new MDisks
        2. 5.6.2 Persistent reserve
        3. 5.6.3 Renaming MDisks
      7. 5.7 Rebalancing extents across a storage pool
        1. 5.7.1 Installing prerequisites and the SAN Volume ControllerTools package
        2. 5.7.2 Running the extent balancing script
      8. 5.8 Removing MDisks from existing storage pools
        1. 5.8.1 Migrating extents from the MDisk to be deleted
        2. 5.8.2 Verifying the identity of an MDisk before removal
        3. 5.8.3 Correlating the back-end volume with the MDisk
      9. 5.9 Remapping managed MDisks
      10. 5.10 Controlling extent allocation order for volume creation
      11. 5.11 Moving an MDisk between SAN Volume Controller clusters
      12. 5.12 MDisk group considerations when Real-time Compression is used
    6. Chapter 6. Volumes
      1. 6.1 Overview of volumes
        1. 6.1.1 Striping compared to sequential type
        2. 6.1.2 Thin-provisioned volumes
        3. 6.1.3 Space allocation
        4. 6.1.4 Compressed volumes
        5. 6.1.5 Thin-provisioned volume
        6. 6.1.6 Limits on virtual capacity of thin-provisioned volumes
        7. 6.1.7 Testing an application with a thin-provisioned volume
      2. 6.2 Volume mirroring
        1. 6.2.1 Creating or adding a mirrored volume
        2. 6.2.2 Availability of mirrored volumes
        3. 6.2.3 Mirroring between controllers
      3. 6.3 Creating volumes
        1. 6.3.1 Selecting the storage pool
        2. 6.3.2 Changing the preferred node within an I/O group
        3. 6.3.3 Non-Disruptive volume move
      4. 6.4 Volume migration
        1. 6.4.1 Image-type to striped-type migration
        2. 6.4.2 Migrating to image-type volume
        3. 6.4.3 Migrating with volume mirroring
      5. 6.5 Preferred paths to a volume
        1. 6.5.1 Governing of volumes
      6. 6.6 Cache mode and cache-disabled volumes
        1. 6.6.1 Underlying controller remote copy with SAN Volume Controller cache-disabled volumes
        2. 6.6.2 Using underlying controller FlashCopy with SAN Volume Controller cache disabled volumes
        3. 6.6.3 Changing the cache mode of a volume
      7. 6.7 Effect of a load on storage controllers
      8. 6.8 Setting up FlashCopy services
        1. 6.8.1 Making a FlashCopy volume with application data integrity
        2. 6.8.2 Making multiple related FlashCopy volumes with data integrity
        3. 6.8.3 Creating multiple identical copies of a volume
        4. 6.8.4 Creating a FlashCopy mapping with the incremental flag
        5. 6.8.5 Using thin-provisioned FlashCopy
        6. 6.8.6 Using FlashCopy with your backup application
        7. 6.8.7 Migrating data by using FlashCopy
        8. 6.8.8 Summary of FlashCopy rules
        9. 6.8.9 IBM Tivoli Storage FlashCopy Manager
        10. 6.8.10 IBM System Storage Support for Microsoft Volume Shadow Copy Service
    7. Chapter 7. Remote copy services
      1. 7.1 Introduction to remote copy services
        1. 7.1.1 Common terminology and definitions
        2. 7.1.2 Intercluster link
      2. 7.2 SAN Volume Controller remote copy functions by release
        1. 7.2.1 Remote copy in SAN Volume Controller V7.2
        2. 7.2.2 Dual physical links with active/standby for use in two or more I/O groups environments
        3. 7.2.3 Remote copy features by release
      3. 7.3 Terminology and functional concepts
        1. 7.3.1 Remote copy partnerships and relationships
        2. 7.3.2 Global Mirror control parameters
        3. 7.3.3 Global Mirror partnerships and relationships
        4. 7.3.4 Asynchronous remote copy
        5. 7.3.5 Understanding remote copy write operations
        6. 7.3.6 Asynchronous remote copy
        7. 7.3.7 Global Mirror write sequence
        8. 7.3.8 Write ordering
        9. 7.3.9 Colliding writes
        10. 7.3.10 Link speed, latency, and bandwidth
        11. 7.3.11 Choosing a link cable of supporting Global Mirror applications
        12. 7.3.12 Remote copy volumes: Copy directions and default roles
      4. 7.4 Intercluster link
        1. 7.4.1 SAN configuration overview
        2. 7.4.2 Switches and ISL oversubscription
        3. 7.4.3 Zoning
        4. 7.4.4 Distance extensions for the intercluster link
        5. 7.4.5 Optical multiplexors
        6. 7.4.6 Long-distance SFPs and XFPs
        7. 7.4.7 Fibre Channel IP conversion
        8. 7.4.8 Configuration of intercluster links
        9. 7.4.9 Link quality
        10. 7.4.10 Hops
        11. 7.4.11 Buffer credits
      5. 7.5 Global Mirror design points
        1. 7.5.1 Global Mirror parameters
        2. 7.5.2 The chcluster and chpartnership commands
        3. 7.5.3 Distribution of Global Mirror bandwidth
        4. 7.5.4 1920 errors
      6. 7.6 Global Mirror planning
        1. 7.6.1 Rules for using Metro Mirror and Global Mirror
        2. 7.6.2 Planning overview
        3. 7.6.3 Planning specifics
      7. 7.7 Global Mirror use cases
        1. 7.7.1 Synchronizing a remote copy relationship
        2. 7.7.2 Global Mirror relationships, saving bandwidth, and resizing volumes
        3. 7.7.3 Master and auxiliary volumes and switching their roles
        4. 7.7.4 Migrating a Metro Mirror relationship to Global Mirror
        5. 7.7.5 Multicluster mirroring
        6. 7.7.6 Performing three-way copy service functions
        7. 7.7.7 When to use storage controller Advanced Copy Services functions
        8. 7.7.8 Using Metro Mirror or Global Mirror with FlashCopy
        9. 7.7.9 Global Mirror upgrade scenarios
      8. 7.8 Intercluster Metro Mirror and Global Mirror source as an FC target
      9. 7.9 States and steps in the Global Mirror relationship
        1. 7.9.1 Global Mirror states
        2. 7.9.2 Disaster recovery and Metro Mirror and Global Mirror states
        3. 7.9.3 State definitions
      10. 7.10 1920 errors
        1. 7.10.1 Diagnosing and fixing 1920 errors
        2. 7.10.2 Focus areas for 1920 errors
        3. 7.10.3 Recovery
        4. 7.10.4 Disabling the glinktolerance feature
        5. 7.10.5 Cluster error code 1920 checklist for diagnosis
      11. 7.11 Monitoring remote copy relationships
    8. Chapter 8. Hosts
      1. 8.1 Configuration guidelines
        1. 8.1.1 Host levels and host object name
        2. 8.1.2 The number of paths
        3. 8.1.3 Host ports
        4. 8.1.4 Port masking
        5. 8.1.5 Host to I/O group mapping
        6. 8.1.6 Volume size as opposed to quantity
        7. 8.1.7 Host volume mapping
        8. 8.1.8 Server adapter layout
        9. 8.1.9 Availability versus error isolation
      2. 8.2 Host pathing
        1. 8.2.1 Preferred path algorithm
        2. 8.2.2 Path selection
        3. 8.2.3 Path management
        4. 8.2.4 Dynamic reconfiguration
        5. 8.2.5 Nondisruptive Volume migration between I/O groups
      3. 8.3 I/O queues
        1. 8.3.1 Queue depths
      4. 8.4 Multipathing software
      5. 8.5 Host clustering and reserves
        1. 8.5.1 Clearing reserves
        2. 8.5.2 SAN Volume Controller MDisk reserves
      6. 8.6 AIX hosts
        1. 8.6.1 HBA parameters for performance tuning
        2. 8.6.2 Configuring for fast fail and dynamic tracking
        3. 8.6.3 Multipathing
        4. 8.6.4 SDD
        5. 8.6.5 SDDPCM
        6. 8.6.6 SDD compared to SDDPCM
      7. 8.7 Virtual I/O Server
        1. 8.7.1 Methods to identify a disk for use as a virtual SCSI disk
        2. 8.7.2 UDID method for MPIO
        3. 8.7.3 Backing up the virtual I/O configuration
      8. 8.8 Windows hosts
        1. 8.8.1 Clustering and reserves
        2. 8.8.2 Tunable parameters
        3. 8.8.3 Changing back-end storage LUN mappings dynamically
        4. 8.8.4 Guidelines for disk alignment by using Windows with SAN Volume Controller volumes
      9. 8.9 Linux hosts
        1. 8.9.1 SDD compared to DM-MPIO
        2. 8.9.2 Tunable parameters
        3. 8.9.3 I/O Scheduler
      10. 8.10 Solaris hosts
        1. 8.10.1 Solaris MPxIO
        2. 8.10.2 Symantec Veritas Volume Manager
        3. 8.10.3 ASL specifics for SAN Volume Controller
        4. 8.10.4 SDD pass-through multipathing
        5. 8.10.5 DMP multipathing
        6. 8.10.6 Troubleshooting configuration issues
      11. 8.11 VMware server
        1. 8.11.1 Multipathing solutions supported
        2. 8.11.2 Multipathing configuration maximums
      12. 8.12 Mirroring considerations
        1. 8.12.1 Host-based mirroring
      13. 8.13 Monitoring
        1. 8.13.1 Automated path monitoring
        2. 8.13.2 Load measurement and stress tools
  6. Part 2 Performance preferred practices
    1. Chapter 9. Performance highlights for SAN Volume Controller V7.2
      1. 9.1 SAN Volume Controller continuing performance enhancements
      2. 9.2 FlashSystem 820 Performance
      3. 9.3 Solid-State Drives and Easy Tier
        1. 9.3.1 Internal SSD redundancy
        2. 9.3.2 Performance scalability and I/O groups
      4. 9.4 Real-Time Performance Monitor
    2. Chapter 10. Back-end storage performance considerations
      1. 10.1 Workload considerations
      2. 10.2 Tiering
      3. 10.3 Storage controller considerations
        1. 10.3.1 Back-end I/O capacity
      4. 10.4 Array considerations
        1. 10.4.1 Selecting the number of LUNs per array
        2. 10.4.2 Selecting the number of arrays per storage pool
      5. 10.5 I/O ports, cache, and throughput considerations
        1. 10.5.1 Back-end queue depth
        2. 10.5.2 MDisk transfer size
      6. 10.6 SAN Volume Controller extent size
      7. 10.7 SAN Volume Controller cache partitioning
      8. 10.8 IBM DS8000 series considerations
        1. 10.8.1 Volume layout
        2. 10.8.2 Cache
        3. 10.8.3 Determining the number of controller ports for DS8000 series
        4. 10.8.4 Storage pool layout
        5. 10.8.5 Extent size
      9. 10.9 IBM XIV considerations
        1. 10.9.1 LUN size
        2. 10.9.2 I/O ports
        3. 10.9.3 Storage pool layout
        4. 10.9.4 Extent size
      10. 10.10 Storwize V7000 considerations
        1. 10.10.1 Volume setup
        2. 10.10.2 I/O ports
        3. 10.10.3 Storage pool layout
        4. 10.10.4 Extent size
      11. 10.11 DS5000 series considerations
        1. 10.11.1 Selecting array and cache parameters
        2. 10.11.2 Considerations for controller configuration
        3. 10.11.3 Mixing array sizes within the storage pool
        4. 10.11.4 Determining the number of controller ports for DS4000
        5. 10.11.5 Performance considerations with FlashSystem
    3. Chapter 11. IBM System Storage Easy Tier function
      1. 11.1 Overview of Easy Tier
      2. 11.2 Easy Tier concepts
        1. 11.2.1 SSD arrays and MDisks
        2. 11.2.2 Disk tiers
        3. 11.2.3 Single tier storage pools
        4. 11.2.4 Multitier storage pools
        5. 11.2.5 Easy Tier process
        6. 11.2.6 Easy Tier operating modes
        7. 11.2.7 Easy Tier activation
      3. 11.3 Easy Tier implementation considerations
        1. 11.3.1 Prerequisites
        2. 11.3.2 Implementation rules
        3. 11.3.3 Easy Tier limitations
      4. 11.4 Measuring and activating Easy Tier
        1. 11.4.1 Measuring by using the Storage Advisor Tool
      5. 11.5 Activating Easy Tier with the SAN Volume Controller CLI
        1. 11.5.1 Initial cluster status
        2. 11.5.2 Turning on Easy Tier evaluation mode
        3. 11.5.3 Creating a multitier storage pool
        4. 11.5.4 Setting the disk tier
        5. 11.5.5 Checking the Easy Tier mode of a volume
        6. 11.5.6 Final cluster status
      6. 11.6 Activating Easy Tier with the SAN Volume Controller GUI
        1. 11.6.1 Setting the disk tier on MDisks
        2. 11.6.2 Checking Easy Tier status
    4. Chapter 12. Applications
      1. 12.1 Application workloads
        1. 12.1.1 Transaction-based workloads
        2. 12.1.2 Throughput-based workloads
        3. 12.1.3 Storage subsystem considerations
        4. 12.1.4 Host considerations
      2. 12.2 Application considerations
        1. 12.2.1 Transaction environments
        2. 12.2.2 Throughput environments
        3. 12.2.3 Performance tuning
      3. 12.3 Data layout overview
        1. 12.3.1 Storage virtualization layers
        2. 12.3.2 Virtualized storage characteristics
        3. 12.3.3 Storage, OS, and application administrator roles
        4. 12.3.4 General data layout guidelines
        5. 12.3.5 Throughput workloads
        6. 12.3.6 LVM volume groups and logical volumes
      4. 12.4 Database storage
      5. 12.5 Data layout with the AIX Virtual I/O Server
        1. 12.5.1 Overview
        2. 12.5.2 Data layout strategies
      6. 12.6 Volume size
      7. 12.7 Failure domains
      8. 12.8 More resources
        1. 12.8.1 IBM System Storage Interoperation Center
        2. 12.8.2 Techdocs - the Technical Sales Library
        3. 12.8.3 DB2 white papers
        4. 12.8.4 Oracle white papers
        5. 12.8.5 Diskcore and Tapecore mailing lists
  7. Part 3 Management, monitoring, and troubleshooting
    1. Chapter 13. Monitoring
      1. 13.1 Analyzing the SAN Volume Controller and Storwize Family Storage Systems by using Tivoli Storage Productivity Center
        1. 13.1.1 Analyzing with the Tivoli Storage Productivity Center 5.2 web-based GUI
      2. 13.2 Considerations for performance analysis
        1. 13.2.1 SAN Volume Controller considerations
        2. 13.2.2 Storwize V7000 considerations
      3. 13.3 Top 10 reports for SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000
        1. 13.3.1 I/O Group Performance for SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000
        2. 13.3.2 Node Cache Performance for SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000
        3. 13.3.3 Viewing the Managed Disk Group Performance report for SAN Volume Controller by using the stand-alone GUI
        4. 13.3.4 Top Volume Performance reports
        5. 13.3.5 Port Performance reports for SAN Volume Controller and Storwize V7000
      4. 13.4 Reports for fabric and switches
        1. 13.4.1 Switches reports
        2. 13.4.2 Switch Port Data Rate Performance
      5. 13.5 Case studies
        1. 13.5.1 Server performance problem
        2. 13.5.2 Disk performance problem in a Storwize V7000 subsystem
        3. 13.5.3 Top volumes response time and I/O rate performance reports
        4. 13.5.4 Performance constraint alerts
        5. 13.5.5 Monitoring and diagnosing performance problems for a fabric Viewing
        6. 13.5.6 Verifying the SAN Volume Controller and Fabric configuration by using Topology Viewer
        7. 13.5.7 Verifying the SAN Volume Controller and Fabric configuration by using the Tivoli Storage Productivity Center 5.2 web-based GUI Data Path tools
      6. 13.6 Monitoring in real time by using the SAN Volume Controller or Storwize V7000 GUI
      7. 13.7 Manually gathering SAN Volume Controller statistics
    2. Chapter 14. Maintenance
      1. 14.1 Automating the documentation for SAN Volume Controller/Storwize and SAN environment
        1. 14.1.1 Naming conventions
        2. 14.1.2 SAN fabrics documentation
        3. 14.1.3 SAN Volume Controller and Storwize family products
        4. 14.1.4 Storage
        5. 14.1.5 Technical Support information
        6. 14.1.6 Tracking incident and change tickets
        7. 14.1.7 Automated support data collection
        8. 14.1.8 Subscribing to SAN Volume Controller/Storwize support
      2. 14.2 Storage management IDs
      3. 14.3 Standard operating procedures
        1. 14.3.1 Allocating and deallocating volumes to hosts
        2. 14.3.2 Adding and removing hosts in SAN Volume Controller/Storwize
      4. 14.4 SAN Volume Controller/Storwize code upgrade
        1. 14.4.1 Preparing for the upgrade
        2. 14.4.2 SAN Volume Controller upgrade from V5.1 to V6.2
        3. 14.4.3 Upgrading SAN Volume Controller clusters/Storwize systems that are participating in Metro Mirror or Global Mirror
        4. 14.4.4 SAN Volume Controller/Storwize upgrade
        5. 14.4.5 Storwize family systems disk drive upgrade
      5. 14.5 SAN modifications
        1. 14.5.1 Cross-referencing HBA WWPNs
        2. 14.5.2 Cross-referencing LUN IDs
        3. 14.5.3 HBA replacement
      6. 14.6 Hardware upgrades for SAN Volume Controller
        1. 14.6.1 Adding SAN Volume Controller nodes to an existing cluster
        2. 14.6.2 Upgrading SAN Volume Controller nodes in an existing cluster
        3. 14.6.3 Moving to a new SAN Volume Controller cluster
      7. 14.7 Adding expansion enclosures to Storwize family systems
      8. 14.8 More information
    3. Chapter 15. Troubleshooting and diagnostics
      1. 15.1 Common problems
        1. 15.1.1 Host problems
        2. 15.1.2 SAN Volume Controller problems
        3. 15.1.3 SAN problems
        4. 15.1.4 Storage subsystem problems
      2. 15.2 Collecting data and isolating the problem
        1. 15.2.1 Host data collection
        2. 15.2.2 SAN Volume Controller data collection
        3. 15.2.3 SAN data collection
        4. 15.2.4 Storage subsystem data collection
      3. 15.3 Recovering from problems
        1. 15.3.1 Solving host problems
        2. 15.3.2 Solving SAN Volume Controller problems
        3. 15.3.3 Solving SAN problems
        4. 15.3.4 Solving back-end storage problems
      4. 15.4 Mapping physical LBAs to volume extents
        1. 15.4.1 Investigating a medium error by using lsvdisklba
        2. 15.4.2 Investigating thin-provisioned volume allocation by using lsmdisklba
      5. 15.5 Medium error logging
        1. 15.5.1 Host-encountered media errors
        2. 15.5.2 SAN Volume Controller-encountered medium errors
        3. 15.5.3 Replacing a bad disk
        4. 15.5.4 Health status during upgrade
  8. Part 4 Practical examples
    1. Chapter 16. SAN Volume Controller scenarios
      1. 16.1 SAN Volume Controller upgrade with CF8 nodes and internal solid-state drives
      2. 16.2 Handling Stuck SAN Volume Controller Code Upgrades
      3. 16.3 Moving an AIX server
      4. 16.4 Migrating to a new SAN Volume Controller by using Copy Services
      5. 16.5 SAN Volume Controller scripting
        1. 16.5.1 Connecting to SAN Volume Controller by using predefined SSH connection
        2. 16.5.2 Scripting toolkit
      6. 16.6 Migrating AIX cluster volumes off DS4700
        1. 16.6.1 Preparation
        2. 16.6.2 Importing image mode volumes
        3. 16.6.3 Data migration
        4. 16.6.4 Final configuration
      7. 16.7 Easy Tier and FlashSystem planned outages
      8. 16.8 Changing LUN ID presented to a VMware ESXi host
    2. Chapter 17. IBM Real-time Compression
      1. 17.1 Overview
      2. 17.2 What is new in version 7.2
      3. 17.3 Evaluate data types for estimated compression savings by using the Comprestimator utility
      4. 17.4 Evaluate workload by using Disk Magic sizing tool
      5. 17.5 Configure a balanced system
      6. 17.6 Verify available CPU resources
      7. 17.7 Compressed and non-compressed volumes in the same MDisk group
      8. 17.8 Application benchmark results
        1. 17.8.1 Synthetic workloads
      9. 17.9 Standard benchmark tools
      10. 17.10 Compression with FlashCopy
      11. 17.11 Compression with Easy Tier
      12. 17.12 Compression on SAN Volume Controller with Storwize V700
      13. 17.13 Related Publications
  9. Appendix A. IBM i considerations
    1. IBM i Storage management
    2. Planning for IBM i capacity
    3. Connecting SAN Volume Controller or Storwize to IBM i
    4. Preparing SAN Volume Controller or Storwize storage for IBM i
    5. Solid-state drives
    6. Sizing Fibre Channel adapters in IBM i and VIOS
    7. Zoning SAN switches
    8. Boot from SAN
    9. IBM i mirroring
    10. IBM i Multipath
    11. Copy services considerations
  10. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications
    2. Other resources
    3. Referenced websites
    4. Help from IBM
  11. Back cover
  12. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  13. Notices
    1. Trademarks