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IBM System Storage N series Software Guide

Book Description

Corporate workgroups, distributed enterprises, and small to medium-sized companies are increasingly seeking to network and consolidate storage to improve availability, share information, reduce costs, and protect and secure information. These organizations require enterprise-class solutions capable of addressing immediate storage needs cost-effectively, while providing an upgrade path for future requirements. IBM® System Storage® N series storage systems and their software capabilities are designed to meet these requirements.

IBM System Storage N series storage systems offer an excellent solution for a broad range of deployment scenarios. IBM System Storage N series storage systems function as a multiprotocol storage device that is designed to allow you to simultaneously serve both file and block-level data across a single network. These activities are demanding procedures that, for some solutions, require multiple, separately managed systems. The flexibility of IBM System Storage N series storage systems, however, allows them to address the storage needs of a wide range of organizations, including distributed enterprises and data centers for midrange enterprises. IBM System Storage N series storage systems also support sites with computer and data-intensive enterprise applications, such as database, data warehousing, workgroup collaboration, and messaging.

This IBM Redbooks® publication explains the software features of the IBM System Storage N series storage systems. This book also covers topics such as installation, setup, and administration of those software features from the IBM System Storage N series storage systems and clients and provides example scenarios.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Figures
  3. Tables
  4. Examples
  5. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  6. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  7. Summary of changes
    1. July 2014, Eighth Edition
  8. Part 1 Introduction
  9. Chapter 1. Overview
    1. 1.1 Introduction to features
    2. 1.2 IBM System Storage N series hardware
    3. 1.3 Software licensing structure
      1. 1.3.1 What is new in Data ONTAP 8.2
      2. 1.3.2 License packages
      3. 1.3.3 Evaluation licenses
    4. 1.4 Data ONTAP 8 supported systems
  10. Chapter 2. Data ONTAP
    1. 2.1 Data ONTAP for IBM System Storage N series
      1. 2.1.1 The challenge of managing explosive growth
      2. 2.1.2 The solutions
    2. 2.2 Data ONTAP overview
    3. 2.3 Data ONTAP approach
    4. 2.4 Data ONTAP architecture
      1. 2.4.1 The Network Interface driver
      2. 2.4.2 The RAID manager
      3. 2.4.3 Data ONTAP startup
    5. 2.5 Data ONTAP 8.1 7-mode
      1. 2.5.1 New terminology
      2. 2.5.2 New and changed platform and hardware support
      3. 2.5.3 Manageability enhancements
      4. 2.5.4 Storage resource management enhancements
      5. 2.5.5 High-availability pair enhancements
      6. 2.5.6 Networking and security protocol enhancements
      7. 2.5.7 File access protocol enhancements
      8. 2.5.8 Data protection enhancements
      9. 2.5.9 Storage efficiency enhancements
      10. 2.5.10 MultiStore enhancements
    6. 2.6 Data ONTAP 8.1 upgrades
    7. 2.7 N series Data Motion
      1. 2.7.1 Overview of Data Motion
      2. 2.7.2 Business value of Data Motion
  11. Chapter 3. Write Anywhere File Layout
    1. 3.1 Introduction to Write Anywhere File Layout
    2. 3.2 Write Anywhere File Layout design
      1. 3.2.1 WAFL overview
      2. 3.2.2 Metadata resides in files
      3. 3.2.3 A tree of blocks
    3. 3.3 File system consistency and non-volatile RAM
    4. 3.4 Write allocation
    5. 3.5 Summary
  12. Chapter 4. Aggregates and volumes
    1. 4.1 Overview of aggregates
      1. 4.1.1 What is new in 8.2
      2. 4.1.2 Mirrored and unmirrored aggregates
      3. 4.1.3 Unmirrored aggregate
      4. 4.1.4 Mirrored aggregate
    2. 4.2 Aggregates and the IBM N series storage hierarchy
      1. 4.2.1 Traditional volume
      2. 4.2.2 Flexible volume (FlexVol)
      3. 4.2.3 Volume properties
      4. 4.2.4 List affiliation of FlexVols and aggregates
    3. 4.3 Introduction to 64-bit aggregates
      1. 4.3.1 Overview
      2. 4.3.2 About aggregate types
      3. 4.3.3 The need for 64-bit aggregates
      4. 4.3.4 Maximum aggregate and volume sizes
      5. 4.3.5 Advantages of 64-bit aggregates
      6. 4.3.6 Creating and managing FlexVol volumes in a 64-bit aggregate
    4. 4.4 Introduction to flexible volumes
      1. 4.4.1 How FlexVol volumes work
      2. 4.4.2 Benefits of FlexVol
      3. 4.4.3 64-bit FlexVol volumes
  13. Chapter 5. qtrees
    1. 5.1 What qtrees are
    2. 5.2 What qtrees do
      1. 5.2.1 Security styles
      2. 5.2.2 Oplocks
      3. 5.2.3 Quotas
      4. 5.2.4 SnapMirror
      5. 5.2.5 SnapVault
    3. 5.3 Working with qtrees
  14. Chapter 6. FlexClone volumes
    1. 6.1 Introduction to FlexClone volumes
    2. 6.2 FlexClone operation
    3. 6.3 Practical applications of FlexClone
    4. 6.4 FlexClone performance
    5. 6.5 Creating a FlexClone
    6. 6.6 Accessing FlexClone volumes
    7. 6.7 Splitting FlexClone volumes
    8. 6.8 Summary
  15. Chapter 7. FlexCache volumes
    1. 7.1 Introduction to FlexCache
    2. 7.2 How FlexCache works
      1. 7.2.1 Caching
      2. 7.2.2 Reads
      3. 7.2.3 Writes
      4. 7.2.4 Caching granularity
  16. Chapter 8. FlexShare
    1. 8.1 Introduction to FlexShare
    2. 8.2 FlexShare concept
      1. 8.2.1 Queues
      2. 8.2.2 Buffer cache policies
      3. 8.2.3 How FlexShare schedules WAFL operations
      4. 8.2.4 How FlexShare manages system resources
    3. 8.3 Benefits of using FlexShare
    4. 8.4 When to use FlexShare
    5. 8.5 Supported configurations
    6. 8.6 Using FlexShare in cluster storage systems
    7. 8.7 Setting up FlexShare
      1. 8.7.1 FlexShare CLI overview
      2. 8.7.2 Enabling FlexShare service
      3. 8.7.3 Priority settings
    8. 8.8 FlexShare usage examples
      1. 8.8.1 Consolidating different workloads
      2. 8.8.2 Mixed storage including FC disks and SATA disks
    9. 8.9 FlexShare preferred practices
      1. 8.9.1 Setting a priority configuration for all volumes in an aggregate
      2. 8.9.2 Configuring Active/Active configurations consistently
      3. 8.9.3 Setting volume cache usage appropriately
      4. 8.9.4 Tuning for SnapMirror and backup operations
    10. 8.10 FlexShare administration
      1. 8.10.1 FlexShare CLI overview
      2. 8.10.2 Expected behavior with other CLI commands
      3. 8.10.3 Managing Data ONTAP API
      4. 8.10.4 Upgrading and reverting
    11. 8.11 Understanding FlexShare behavior and troubleshooting
      1. 8.11.1 Using counters to analyze FlexShare behavior
      2. 8.11.2 Troubleshooting
      3. 8.11.3 FlexShare off versus on
      4. 8.11.4 Maintaining priority configurations
    12. 8.12 Summary
  17. Chapter 9. Network configuration
    1. 9.1 Network interfaces
      1. 9.1.1 Maximum number of network interfaces
      2. 9.1.2 Maximum number of interface groups
    2. 9.2 Configuring network interfaces
      1. 9.2.1 Configuring a partner interface in an HA pair
      2. 9.2.2 Enabling or disabling automatic takeover for a network interface
    3. 9.3 How routing data in Data ONTAP works
      1. 9.3.1 Routing mechanisms
      2. 9.3.2 How fast path works
    4. 9.4 Interface groups
      1. 9.4.1 Types of interface groups
      2. 9.4.2 Load balancing in multimode interface groups
    5. 9.5 Ways to improve your storage system's performance
  18. Chapter 10. MultiStore
    1. 10.1 Introduction to vFiler
      1. 10.1.1 Number of vFiler units allowed
      2. 10.1.2 vFiler supported protocols
      3. 10.1.3 Using vFiler
    2. 10.2 vFiler benefits
    3. 10.3 vFiler scenarios
      1. 10.3.1 vFiler migration with SnapMirror
      2. 10.3.2 vFiler disaster recovery
  19. Part 2 Data protection
  20. Chapter 11. Snapshot
    1. 11.1 Introduction to Snapshot
      1. 11.1.1 Snap commands
      2. 11.1.2 Automatic Snapshots
    2. 11.2 Snapshot process: Basic operation
    3. 11.3 Understanding Snapshots in detail
      1. 11.3.1 How Snapshot copies consume disk space
      2. 11.3.2 How changing file content consumes disk space
      3. 11.3.3 What the Snapshot copy reserve is
    4. 11.4 Snapshot data structures and algorithms
      1. 11.4.1 Creating a Snapshot
      2. 11.4.2 Deleting a Snapshot
  21. Chapter 12. SnapRestore
    1. 12.1 SnapRestore at a glance
    2. 12.2 Introduction to SnapRestore
      1. 12.2.1 Cost and storage efficiency
      2. 12.2.2 Data restoration
      3. 12.2.3 A possible SnapRestore use
      4. 12.2.4 Flexible restore
      5. 12.2.5 Additional benefits
    3. 12.3 SnapRestore operation
      1. 12.3.1 What SnapRestore reverts
      2. 12.3.2 Applying SnapRestore
    4. 12.4 SnapRestore: Details of operation
    5. 12.5 Examples
      1. 12.5.1 SnapRestore command syntax
      2. 12.5.2 Considerations before performing SnapRestore
      3. 12.5.3 The process for restoring data
      4. 12.5.4 SnapRestore volume restore
      5. 12.5.5 SnapRestore single file restore
      6. 12.5.6 Mounting the Snapshot directly from a server
    6. 12.6 SnapRestore for databases
      1. 12.6.1 SnapRestore for databases overview
      2. 12.6.2 SnapRestore for databases scenario
  22. Chapter 13. SnapMirror
    1. 13.1 SnapMirror at a glance
    2. 13.2 Introduction to SnapMirror
      1. 13.2.1 The need for SnapMirror
      2. 13.2.2 Rules for using SnapMirror
    3. 13.3 The three modes of SnapMirror
      1. 13.3.1 Asynchronous mode
      2. 13.3.2 Synchronous mode
      3. 13.3.3 Semi-synchronous mode
    4. 13.4 SnapMirror applications
    5. 13.5 Synchronous and asynchronous implications
    6. 13.6 Volume capacity and SnapMirror
    7. 13.7 Guarantees in a SnapMirror deployment
    8. 13.8 SnapMirror architecture
    9. 13.9 Isolating testing from production
    10. 13.10 Cascading mirrors
      1. 13.10.1 Cascading replication
      2. 13.10.2 Disaster recovery
    11. 13.11 Performance impact of synchronous and semi-synchronous modes
    12. 13.12 CPU impact of synchronous and semi-synchronous modes
    13. 13.13 Network bandwidth considerations
    14. 13.14 Replication considerations
      1. 13.14.1 Maximum concurrent transfers for clustered configurations
  23. Chapter 14. SnapLock
    1. 14.1 SnapLock at a glance
    2. 14.2 Introduction to SnapLock
      1. 14.2.1 SnapLock Compliance
      2. 14.2.2 SnapLock Enterprise
    3. 14.3 SnapLock setup
  24. Chapter 15. SyncMirror
    1. 15.1 Background
      1. 15.1.1 What is new in 8.2
    2. 15.2 Differences between SnapMirror and SyncMirror
    3. 15.3 Implementing local SyncMirror
      1. 15.3.1 Preliminary construction and considerations
      2. 15.3.2 Implementation of SyncMirror
      3. 15.3.3 Controlling plexes
    4. 15.4 How SyncMirror works with third-party storage
    5. 15.5 Disaster recovery with SyncMirror
  25. Chapter 16. MetroCluster
    1. 16.1 Overview of MetroCluster
    2. 16.2 Business continuity solutions
    3. 16.3 Stretch MetroCluster
      1. 16.3.1 Planning Stretch MetroCluster configurations
      2. 16.3.2 Cabling Stretch MetroClusters
    4. 16.4 Fabric Attached MetroCluster
      1. 16.4.1 Planning Fabric Attached MetroCluster configurations
      2. 16.4.2 Cabling Fabric Attached MetroClusters
    5. 16.5 Synchronous mirroring with SyncMirror
      1. 16.5.1 SyncMirror overview
      2. 16.5.2 SyncMirror without MetroCluster
    6. 16.6 MetroCluster zoning and TI zones
    7. 16.7 Failure scenarios
      1. 16.7.1 MetroCluster host failure
      2. 16.7.2 N series and expansion unit failure
      3. 16.7.3 MetroCluster interconnect failure
      4. 16.7.4 MetroCluster site failure
      5. 16.7.5 MetroCluster site recovery
  26. Part 3 Storage efficiency technology
  27. Chapter 17. SnapVault
    1. 17.1 SnapVault at a glance
      1. 17.1.1 What is new in 8.2
    2. 17.2 Business applications of SnapVault
    3. 17.3 Overview of SnapVault
    4. 17.4 Benefits of using SnapVault
      1. 17.4.1 Incremental backups forever
      2. 17.4.2 Self-service restores
      3. 17.4.3 Consistent security
    5. 17.5 SnapVault operation
      1. 17.5.1 Snapshots, volumes, and qtrees
      2. 17.5.2 SnapVault example
      3. 17.5.3 Special case: Database and application server backups
      4. 17.5.4 Special case: Backup of FCP or iSCSI LUNs
    6. 17.6 SnapVault backup
      1. 17.6.1 Incremental backups (updates)
      2. 17.6.2 Scheduling/retention policy
      3. 17.6.3 Snapshot copies
    7. 17.7 SnapVault details
    8. 17.8 Disaster recovery with SnapVault
      1. 17.8.1 SnapVault options
      2. 17.8.2 Comparing SnapMirror and SnapVault
    9. 17.9 Remote solution using SnapVault
    10. 17.10 Maximum number of concurrent SnapVault targets
    11. 17.11 Preferred practices
      1. 17.11.1 General preferred practices
      2. 17.11.2 Common misconfigurations
    12. 17.12 Summary
  28. Chapter 18. What storage efficiency is
    1. 18.1 The IBM N series advantage
    2. 18.2 SATA storage disks and Flash Cache
    3. 18.3 Protection against double disk failure with RAID-DP
      1. 18.3.1 What RAID-DP protection is
      2. 18.3.2 How RAID-DP protection works
    4. 18.4 How space management works
      1. 18.4.1 What kind of space management to use
      2. 18.4.2 What space guarantees are
      3. 18.4.3 What space reservation is
      4. 18.4.4 What fractional reserve is
      5. 18.4.5 Reasons to set fractional reserve to zero
      6. 18.4.6 Automatic space provisioning for full volumes
    5. 18.5 Thin provisioning using FlexVol volumes
      1. 18.5.1 Storage space management using OnCommand
      2. 18.5.2 Automating thin provisioning using Provisioning Manager
  29. Chapter 19. Deduplication
    1. 19.1 How deduplication works
    2. 19.2 What deduplication metadata is
    3. 19.3 Guidelines for using deduplication
    4. 19.4 Deduplication commands
      1. 19.4.1 Activating the deduplication license
      2. 19.4.2 Common deduplication operations
    5. 19.5 Performance considerations for deduplication
    6. 19.6 How deduplication works with other features and products
      1. 19.6.1 Deduplication and Snapshot copies
      2. 19.6.2 Deduplication and volume SnapMirror
      3. 19.6.3 Deduplication and qtree SnapMirror
      4. 19.6.4 Deduplication and SnapVault
      5. 19.6.5 Deduplication and SnapRestore
      6. 19.6.6 Deduplication and volume copy
      7. 19.6.7 Deduplication and FlexClone volumes
      8. 19.6.8 Deduplication in a High Availability pair
      9. 19.6.9 Deduplication and VMware
      10. 19.6.10 Deduplication and MultiStore
  30. Chapter 20. Compression
    1. 20.1 Introduction to data compression
      1. 20.1.1 How N series data compression works
      2. 20.1.2 When data compression runs
    2. 20.2 Potential space savings
    3. 20.3 Performance
      1. 20.3.1 Performance impact of in-line and post-process compression
      2. 20.3.2 I/O performance on compressed volumes
    4. 20.4 Compression examples
      1. 20.4.1 Creating a new volume and enabling compression and deduplication
      2. 20.4.2 Enabling compression and deduplication on an existing volume
  31. Chapter 21. IBM Real-time Compression Appliance
    1. 21.1 Introduction to data compression
    2. 21.2 IBM Real-time Compression
    3. 21.3 Benefits
    4. 21.4 IBM RTCA RACE technology
  32. Chapter 22. Thin replication using SnapVault and Volume SnapMirror
    1. 22.1 Disk-to-Disk backups using SnapVault
      1. 22.1.1 What data gets backed up and restored through SnapVault
      2. 22.1.2 Types of SnapVault deployment
      3. 22.1.3 How SnapVault backup works
      4. 22.1.4 Guidelines for creating a SnapVault relationship
      5. 22.1.5 About LUN clones and SnapVault
    2. 22.2 Efficient data protection using volume SnapMirror
      1. 22.2.1 How SnapMirror works
      2. 22.2.2 SnapMirror use cases
      3. 22.2.3 Preferred practices while using SnapMirror
      4. 22.2.4 SnapMirror deployment variations
      5. 22.2.5 Cascading data replication
  33. Part 4 Storage access protocols
  34. Chapter 23. CIFS and Active Directory
    1. 23.1 Supported CIFS versions
    2. 23.2 Joining the N series CIFS service to Active Directory
      1. 23.2.1 Data ONTAP
      2. 23.2.2 Machine accounts
    3. 23.3 Prerequisite steps for Active Directory integration
    4. 23.4 Selecting a user account
      1. 23.4.1 Preparation
      2. 23.4.2 Acquiring rights
    5. 23.5 Precreating a computer object
      1. 23.5.1 Creating the computer object
      2. 23.5.2 Completion of the Active Directory integration
    6. 23.6 Running the CIFS setup wizard
      1. 23.6.1 Running the CIFS setup wizard using Data ONTAP CLI
      2. 23.6.2 Running the CIFS setup wizard using System Manager
      3. 23.6.3 Active Directory: Mixed mode or native mode
      4. 23.6.4 Domain function levels (mixed and native)
    7. 23.7 Troubleshooting the domain joining process
      1. 23.7.1 DNS
      2. 23.7.2 Time synchronization
      3. 23.7.3 Active Directory replication
    8. 23.8 Device discovery
    9. 23.9 Automatic home shares
      1. 23.9.1 Visibility of shares
      2. 23.9.2 Configuring the NAS controller
  35. Chapter 24. NFS
    1. 24.1 What NFS is
    2. 24.2 NFS versions
      1. 24.2.1 NFS V1
      2. 24.2.2 NFS V2
      3. 24.2.3 NFS V3
      4. 24.2.4 NFS V4
    3. 24.3 File access using NFS
      1. 24.3.1 Exporting or unexporting file system paths
      2. 24.3.2 Editing the /etc/exports file
    4. 24.4 NFS shares
    5. 24.5 NFS Data ONTAP 8.1 commands
    6. 24.6 Enabling Kerberos v5 security services for NFS
    7. 24.7 Interoperability
  36. Chapter 25. Multiprotocol data access
    1. 25.1 Introduction to multiprotocol access
    2. 25.2 File system permissions
      1. 25.2.1 UNIX file permissions
      2. 25.2.2 NTFS file permissions
      3. 25.2.3 NFS access of data
      4. 25.2.4 NTFS access modes
    3. 25.3 File service for environments with NFS and CIFS
      1. 25.3.1 CIFS access of UNIX security data
      2. 25.3.2 CIFS access of NTFS data
      3. 25.3.3 CIFS access of NTFS data
    4. 25.4 Altering qtree security at the qtree level or volume level
    5. 25.5 NFS
    6. 25.6 CIFS
    7. 25.7 NFS compared to CIFS
    8. 25.8 Mixing NFS and CIFS
    9. 25.9 Multiprotocol file service
      1. 25.9.1 Emulated multiprotocol file service
      2. 25.9.2 Native multiprotocol file service
  37. Chapter 26. Fibre Channel
    1. 26.1 Fibre Channel defined
    2. 26.2 What FC nodes are
    3. 26.3 How FC target nodes connect to the network
    4. 26.4 How FC nodes are identified
      1. 26.4.1 How WWPNs are used
      2. 26.4.2 How storage systems are identified
      3. 26.4.3 How hosts are identified
      4. 26.4.4 How switches are identified
    5. 26.5 Further information
  38. Chapter 27. FCoE
    1. 27.1 Benefits of a unified infrastructure
    2. 27.2 Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE)
    3. 27.3 Data center bridging
    4. 27.4 Further information
  39. Chapter 28. iSCSI
    1. 28.1 What iSCSI is
    2. 28.2 How iSCSI nodes are identified
      1. 28.2.1 The iqn-type designator
      2. 28.2.2 Storage system node name
      3. 28.2.3 The eui-type designator
    3. 28.3 How the storage system checks initiator node names
    4. 28.4 Default port for iSCSI
    5. 28.5 What target portal groups are
    6. 28.6 What iSNS is
    7. 28.7 What CHAP authentication is
    8. 28.8 How iSCSI communication sessions work
    9. 28.9 How iSCSI works with HA pairs
    10. 28.10 Further information
  40. Chapter 29. Other protocols
    1. 29.1 File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
      1. 29.1.1 Enabling and disabling FTP
      2. 29.1.2 Blocking and protecting data and access
    2. 29.2 Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP)
      1. 29.2.1 Limitations of Data ONTAP support for SFTP
      2. 29.2.2 Enabling or disabling SFTP
      3. 29.2.3 Enabling or disabling SFTP file locking
    3. 29.3 File Transfer Protocol over SSL (FTPS)
      1. 29.3.1 Differences between implicit and explicit FTPS
      2. 29.3.2 Implicit FTPS
      3. 29.3.3 Explicit FTPS
    4. 29.4 Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)
      1. 29.4.1 Managing the Data ONTAP HTTP server
      2. 29.4.2 Enabling or disabling the bypassing of HTTP traverse checking
      3. 29.4.3 Specifying the root directory for the HTTP server
      4. 29.4.4 Testing the HTTP server
    5. 29.5 WebDAV
  41. Part 5 Application and host OS integration
  42. Chapter 30. SnapDrive
    1. 30.1 Challenges
    2. 30.2 SnapDrive overview
      1. 30.2.1 Components of SnapDrive
      2. 30.2.2 Benefits of SnapDrive
    3. 30.3 SnapDrive integration with the host operating system
    4. 30.4 Snapshots using SnapDrive
      1. 30.4.1 Consistent Snapshots
      2. 30.4.2 Preferred practices for Snapshots
      3. 30.4.3 Volume-size rules
    5. 30.5 SnapDrive for Windows
      1. 30.5.1 SnapDrive software components
      2. 30.5.2 Windows Device Manager
      3. 30.5.3 Dynamic file system expansion
      4. 30.5.4 Volumes, RAID groups, and virtual disks
    6. 30.6 SnapDrive for UNIX
      1. 30.6.1 How SnapDrive for UNIX works
      2. 30.6.2 SnapDrive for UNIX and logical volumes
    7. 30.7 Flexible networked storage
    8. 30.8 Summary
  43. Chapter 31. SnapManager
    1. 31.1 Introduction to SnapManager
    2. 31.2 Supported databases and applications
    3. 31.3 SnapManager for Hyper-V
      1. 31.3.1 What you can do with SnapManager for Hyper-V
      2. 31.3.2 Installing and uninstalling SnapManager for Hyper-V
      3. 31.3.3 Configuring SnapManager for Hyper-V
      4. 31.3.4 Managing backup jobs
      5. 31.3.5 Restoring a virtual machine
    4. 31.4 SnapManager for Microsoft Exchange
      1. 31.4.1 What SnapManager for Microsoft Exchange does
      2. 31.4.2 Installation on a stand-alone Windows host system
      3. 31.4.3 Installing SnapManager in interactive mode
    5. 31.5 SnapManager for Oracle on UNIX
      1. 31.5.1 What SnapManager for Oracle on UNIX does
      2. 31.5.2 Installing or upgrading SnapManager on a UNIX host
    6. 31.6 SnapManager for SAP on Windows
      1. 31.6.1 What SnapManager for SAP on Windows does
      2. 31.6.2 Installing SnapManager for SAP on Windows
  44. Chapter 32. Snap Creator
    1. 32.1 Snap Creator architecture
      1. 32.1.1 Security features of Snap Creator
      2. 32.1.2 Snap Creator integration
      3. 32.1.3 What a Snap Creator agent is
    2. 32.2 Installing Snap Creator on UNIX
      1. 32.2.1 Installing the Snap Creator Server
      2. 32.2.2 Installing Snap Creator agent
    3. 32.3 Configuring Snap Creator Server
      1. 32.3.1 Creating a configuration file using CLI
      2. 32.3.2 Creating a configuration file using the GUI
  45. Chapter 33. VMware vSphere
    1. 33.1 Server virtualization
      1. 33.1.1 VMware Virtual Infrastructure
      2. 33.1.2 Implementation example
    2. 33.2 Benefits of N series with VMware vSphere 5
      1. 33.2.1 Increased protection with RAID-DP
      2. 33.2.2 Cloning virtual machines
      3. 33.2.3 Multiprotocol capability for storing files on iSCSI, SAN, or NFS volumes
      4. 33.2.4 N series LUNs for VMWare host boot
      5. 33.2.5 N series LUNs for VMFS datastores
      6. 33.2.6 Using N series LUNs for Raw Device Mappings
      7. 33.2.7 Growing VMFS datastores
      8. 33.2.8 Backup and recovery of the virtual infrastructure (SnapVault, Snapshot, SnapMirror)
    3. 33.3 Virtual Storage Console
    4. 33.4 Using N series deduplication with VMware
    5. 33.5 Coupling deduplication and compression
    6. 33.6 Further reading
  46. Chapter 34. Virtual Storage Console 4.1
    1. 34.1 Virtual Storage Console
      1. 34.1.1 Introduction to the Virtual Storage Console
      2. 34.1.2 License requirements
      3. 34.1.3 Architecture overview
      4. 34.1.4 Monitoring and host configuration
      5. 34.1.5 Provisioning and cloning
    2. 34.2 Installing the Virtual Storage Console 4.1
      1. 34.2.1 Basic installation
      2. 34.2.2 Registration completion
    3. 34.3 Adding storage controllers to the VSC
    4. 34.4 Optimal storage settings for ESXi host
    5. 34.5 SnapMirror integration
      1. 34.5.1 SnapMirror destinations
      2. 34.5.2 SnapMirror and deduplication
    6. 34.6 VSC in an N series MetroCluster environment
    7. 34.7 Backup and recovery
      1. 34.7.1 Data layout
      2. 34.7.2 Backup and recovery requirements
      3. 34.7.3 Single wizard for creating backup jobs
      4. 34.7.4 Granular restore options
      5. 34.7.5 Other features
    8. 34.8 Provisioning and cloning
      1. 34.8.1 Features and functions
      2. 34.8.2 Provisioning datastores
      3. 34.8.3 Managing deduplication
      4. 34.8.4 Cloning virtual machines
      5. 34.8.5 Reclaiming space on virtual machines
    9. 34.9 Optimum VM availability
      1. 34.9.1 Optimizing VM SCSI BUS
      2. 34.9.2 Optimal storage performance
      3. 34.9.3 VM partition alignment
      4. 34.9.4 N series MBR Tools: Identification of partition alignment status
      5. 34.9.5 Windows VM file system performance
    10. 34.10 VSC commands
    11. 34.11 Scripting
  47. Chapter 35. Consistency groups
    1. 35.1 Snapshot backup and application consistency
      1. 35.1.1 Application-consistent
      2. 35.1.2 Crash-consistent
      3. 35.1.3 Non-consistent
    2. 35.2 Consistency groups
      1. 35.2.1 Consistency group architecture overview
      2. 35.2.2 CG Primitives: APIs
    3. 35.3 How to use consistency groups
      1. 35.3.1 SnapDrive
      2. 35.3.2 SnapCreator
      3. 35.3.3 Custom scripting
  48. Part 6 Storage management
  49. Chapter 36. Remote management
    1. 36.1 Remote LAN Module (RLM)
      1. 36.1.1 Ways to configure the RLM
      2. 36.1.2 Prerequisites for configuring the RLM
      3. 36.1.3 Setting up the RLM
    2. 36.2 Baseboard Management Controller (BMC)
      1. 36.2.1 Ways to configure the BMC
      2. 36.2.2 Prerequisites for configuring the BMC
      3. 36.2.3 Setting up the BMC
    3. 36.3 Service Processor (SP)
      1. 36.3.1 Ways to configure the SP
      2. 36.3.2 Prerequisites for configuring the SP
      3. 36.3.3 Setting up the SP
    4. 36.4 CLI administration
  50. Chapter 37. Command line administration
    1. 37.1 Introduction to CLI administration
      1. 37.1.1 Audit logging
      2. 37.1.2 Preferred practice
    2. 37.2 Telnet
      1. 37.2.1 Telnet session options
      2. 37.2.2 Starting a Telnet session
    3. 37.3 SSH
      1. 37.3.1 SSH options
      2. 37.3.2 Interactive SSH support for vFiler units
    4. 37.4 RSH
  51. Chapter 38. N series System Manager
    1. 38.1 Introduction to N series System Manager (NSM)
    2. 38.2 Installing the N series System Manager
      1. 38.2.1 Installing NSM on Windows
      2. 38.2.2 Installing System Manager on Linux
    3. 38.3 Getting started with NSM
      1. 38.3.1 Starting NSM
      2. 38.3.2 Adding a storage system
      3. 38.3.3 Configuring a storage system
  52. Chapter 39. AutoSupport
    1. 39.1 Overview of AutoSupport
    2. 39.2 What is new in 8.2
    3. 39.3 How AutoSupport works
    4. 39.4 High level perspective
    5. 39.5 Detailed perspective
  53. Chapter 40. OnCommand
    1. 40.1 Introduction to OnCommand
      1. 40.1.1 OnCommand architecture
      2. 40.1.2 Dashboard
    2. 40.2 Key functionality
      1. 40.2.1 Operations
      2. 40.2.2 Provisioning
      3. 40.2.3 Protection
      4. 40.2.4 Plug-ins
      5. 40.2.5 N series Operations Manager
      6. 40.2.6 N series Management Console
      7. 40.2.7 Host Agent
  54. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  55. Back cover
  56. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  57. Notices
    1. Trademarks