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IBM System Storage N series Clustered Data ONTAP

Book Description

IBM® System Storage® N series storage systems offer an excellent solution for a broad range of deployment scenarios. IBM System Storage N series storage systems function as a multiprotocol storage device that is designed to allow you to simultaneously serve both file and block-level data across a single network. These activities are demanding procedures that, for some solutions, require multiple, separately managed systems. The flexibility of IBM System Storage N series storage systems, however, allows them to address the storage needs of a wide range of organizations, including distributed enterprises and data centers for midrange enterprises. IBM System Storage N series storage systems also support sites with computer and data-intensive enterprise applications, such as database, data warehousing, workgroup collaboration, and messaging.

This IBM Redbooks® publication explains the software features of the IBM System Storage N series storage systems with Clustered Data ONTAP (cDOT) Version 8.2, which is the first version available on the IBM System Storage N series, and as of October 2013, is also the most current version available. cDOT is different from previous ONTAP versions by the fact that it offers a storage solution that operates as a cluster with flexible scaling capabilities. cDOT configurations allow clients to build a scale-out architecture, protecting their investment and allowing horizontal scaling of their environment.

This book also covers topics such as installation, setup, and administration of those software features from the IBM System Storage N series storage systems and clients, and provides example scenarios.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Figures
  3. Tables
  4. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  5. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  6. Part 1 Architectural overview
  7. Chapter 1. Clustered Data ONTAP: What it is
    1. 1.1 Clustered Data ONTAP software
      1. 1.1.1 Multi-protocol unified architecture
      2. 1.1.2 Clustered Data ONTAP 8.2
      3. 1.1.3 N series OnCommand
    2. 1.2 Clustered Data ONTAP hardware
    3. 1.3 Multi-tenancy and cluster components
  8. Chapter 2. Clustered Data ONTAP 8.2 architecture
    1. 2.1 Hardware support and basic system overview
    2. 2.2 Clustered Data ONTAP hardware architecture
      1. 2.2.1 Node Vol0 volume
      2. 2.2.2 Local request path
      3. 2.2.3 Remote request path
    3. 2.3 Storage virtual machine
      1. 2.3.1 Cluster management server
      2. 2.3.2 Data storage virtual machine
      3. 2.3.3 The immortal storage virtual machine
      4. 2.3.4 SVM resiliency
      5. 2.3.5 Node (controller) resiliency
      6. 2.3.6 Storage virtual machine root volume
      7. 2.3.7 Cluster replication ring
      8. 2.3.8 Replicated database
    4. 2.4 Understanding cluster quorum, epsilon, and data availability
      1. 2.4.1 Cluster quorum
      2. 2.4.2 Epsilon
    5. 2.5 Clustered Data ONTAP networking
      1. 2.5.1 Cluster-interconnect
      2. 2.5.2 Management network
      3. 2.5.3 Data networks
      4. 2.5.4 LIF resiliency
    6. 2.6 Multi-tenancy
    7. 2.7 Clustered Data ONTAP 8.2 licensing
      1. 2.7.1 License management
      2. 2.7.2 License types
  9. Chapter 3. Terminology in Clustered Data ONTAP 8.2
    1. 3.1 Storage efficiency features
    2. 3.2 Virtual Storage Tier Portfolio
    3. 3.3 Cluster and high-availability terms
    4. 3.4 New features included in cluster ONTAP 8.2
  10. Chapter 4. Clustered Data ONTAP compared to 7-Mode
    1. 4.1 Storage virtual machine versus vFiler unit
    2. 4.2 Failover and giveback comparison
    3. 4.3 Data protection and load sharing
      1. 4.3.1 SnapMirror
      2. 4.3.2 SnapVault
      3. 4.3.3 NDMP
      4. 4.3.4 Data protection mirror
      5. 4.3.5 Load-sharing mirror
    4. 4.4 Cluster management
  11. Chapter 5. High availability (HA) pairs and failover behavior
    1. 5.1 What an HA pair is
    2. 5.2 Preferred practices for HA pairs
    3. 5.3 Cluster consisting of a single HA pair
    4. 5.4 Non-disruptive operations and HA pairs support
    5. 5.5 HA pairs within the cluster
    6. 5.6 When takeovers occur
      1. 5.6.1 What happens during takeover
      2. 5.6.2 What happens during giveback
      3. 5.6.3 Displaying the nodes in a cluster
      4. 5.6.4 HA policy and giveback of the root aggregate and volume
    7. 5.7 How aggregate relocation works
  12. Chapter 6. Physical cluster types and scaling
    1. 6.1 Physical cluster types
      1. 6.1.1 Single node cluster
      2. 6.1.2 Two-node cluster
      3. 6.1.3 Multinode cluster
    2. 6.2 Supported systems and cluster configurations for Data ONTAP 8.2
    3. 6.3 Intelligent scale-out storage versus scale-up
    4. 6.4 Non-disruptive operations
  13. Part 2 Features
  14. Chapter 7. Physical storage
    1. 7.1 Managing disks
      1. 7.1.1 How Data ONTAP reports drive types
      2. 7.1.2 Storage connection architectures and topologies
      3. 7.1.3 Usable and physical disk capacity by disk size
      4. 7.1.4 Methods of calculating aggregate and system capacity
      5. 7.1.5 Disk speeds supported by Data ONTAP
      6. 7.1.6 Checksum types and how they affect aggregate and spare management
      7. 7.1.7 Drive name formats
      8. 7.1.8 Loop IDs for FC-AL connected disks
    2. 7.2 RAID protection
      1. 7.2.1 RAID protection levels for disks
      2. 7.2.2 Data ONTAP RAID groups
      3. 7.2.3 Data ONTAP hot spare disks
    3. 7.3 Aggregates
      1. 7.3.1 FlexVol and SVM associations
      2. 7.3.2 How aggregates work
      3. 7.3.3 How Flash Pools work
      4. 7.3.4 Determining space usage in an aggregate
      5. 7.3.5 Determining and controlling a volume's space usage in the aggregate
    4. 7.4 Storage limits
  15. Chapter 8. Logical storage
    1. 8.1 How volumes work
      1. 8.1.1 What a FlexVol volume is
      2. 8.1.2 What an Infinite Volume is
      3. 8.1.3 Comparison of FlexVol volumes and Infinite Volumes
      4. 8.1.4 How FlexVol volumes and Infinite Volumes share aggregates
      5. 8.1.5 System volumes
    2. 8.2 FlexVol volumes
      1. 8.2.1 Difference between 64-bit and 32-bit FlexVol volumes
      2. 8.2.2 FlexVol volumes and SVMs
      3. 8.2.3 Volume junctions
      4. 8.2.4 Space management
      5. 8.2.5 Rules governing node root volumes and root aggregates
      6. 8.2.6 Moving and copying volumes (cluster administrators only)
      7. 8.2.7 FlexClone volumes
      8. 8.2.8 Qtrees
      9. 8.2.9 Quotas
    3. 8.3 Infinite Volumes
      1. 8.3.1 Infinite Volume components
      2. 8.3.2 Requirements for Infinite Volumes
      3. 8.3.3 Before you create an Infinite Volume
      4. 8.3.4 Storage classes and data policies
      5. 8.3.5 Managing data policies for an SVM with Infinite Volume
      6. 8.3.6 Infinite Volume constituents
      7. 8.3.7 Planning aggregates for an Infinite Volume
    4. 8.4 Storage limits
  16. Chapter 9. Networking
    1. 9.1 Networking components
    2. 9.2 Network ports
    3. 9.3 Interface groups
      1. 9.3.1 Creating interface groups
      2. 9.3.2 Deleting interface groups
    4. 9.4 VLANs
      1. 9.4.1 Creating a VLAN
      2. 9.4.2 Deleting a VLAN
    5. 9.5 Failover groups
      1. 9.5.1 Creating failover groups
      2. 9.5.2 Deleting failover groups
    6. 9.6 Logical interfaces
      1. 9.6.1 LIF types
      2. 9.6.2 LIF limitations
      3. 9.6.3 Creating an LIF
      4. 9.6.4 Modifying an LIF
      5. 9.6.5 Migrating an LIF
      6. 9.6.6 Reverting an LIF
      7. 9.6.7 Deleting an LIF
    7. 9.7 Routing groups
      1. 9.7.1 Creating routing groups
      2. 9.7.2 Deleting routing groups
      3. 9.7.3 Creating a static route
      4. 9.7.4 Deleting a static route
  17. Chapter 10. NAS protocols
    1. 10.1 Supported network protocols and characteristics
      1. 10.1.1 Connectionless and connection-oriented
      2. 10.1.2 Physical ports configuration for performance or redundancy
    2. 10.2 CIFS
      1. 10.2.1 Change history
      2. 10.2.2 SMB 2.0 and 3.0 enhancements
      3. 10.2.3 Supported SMB versions for each Data ONTAP feature
      4. 10.2.4 Takeover in a CIFS environment
      5. 10.2.5 CIFS configuration in Clustered Data ONTAP
    3. 10.3 NFS
      1. 10.3.1 Change history
      2. 10.3.2 NFS v3, v4, and v4.1 protocols: Enhancements
      3. 10.3.3 Supported NFS versions for each Data ONTAP feature and referrals
      4. 10.3.4 NFS configuration in Clustered Data ONTAP
    4. 10.4 pNFS
      1. 10.4.1 pNFS: What it is, and why it was created
      2. 10.4.2 pNFS: How it works
      3. 10.4.3 pNFS configuration in Clustered Data ONTAP
    5. 10.5 Further information
  18. Chapter 11. SAN protocols
    1. 11.1 Clustered Data ONTAP with SAN protocols
      1. 11.1.1 Volume configuration
      2. 11.1.2 Host connectivity
      3. 11.1.3 Path selection
      4. 11.1.4 Path selection changes
    2. 11.2 Fiber Channel (FC)
      1. 11.2.1 Fibre Channel defined
      2. 11.2.2 What FC nodes are
      3. 11.2.3 How FC target nodes connect to the network
      4. 11.2.4 How FC nodes are identified
      5. 11.2.5 How WWPNs are used
    3. 11.3 iSCSI
      1. 11.3.1 What iSCSI is
      2. 11.3.2 How iSCSI nodes are identified
      3. 11.3.3 iqn-type designator
      4. 11.3.4 Storage system node name
      5. 11.3.5 eui-type designator
      6. 11.3.6 How the storage system checks initiator node names
      7. 11.3.7 Default port for iSCSI
      8. 11.3.8 What target portal groups are
      9. 11.3.9 What iSNS is
      10. 11.3.10 What CHAP authentication is
      11. 11.3.11 How iSCSI communication sessions work
    4. 11.4 FCoE
      1. 11.4.1 Benefits of a unified infrastructure
      2. 11.4.2 Fibre Channel over Ethernet
      3. 11.4.3 Data center bridging
    5. 11.5 Further information
  19. Chapter 12. Ancillary protocols
    1. 12.1 Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP)
      1. 12.1.1 About NDMP modes of operation
      2. 12.1.2 Tape backup of FlexVol volumes with NDMP
      3. 12.1.3 SVM-aware NDMP
      4. 12.1.4 Configuring for NDMP
      5. 12.1.5 Clustered Data ONTAP and NDMP
      6. 12.1.6 Preferred practices for disaster recovery with NDMP
    2. 12.2 Further information about SAN and Fibre Channel
  20. Chapter 13. Storage efficiency
    1. 13.1 Thin provisioning
      1. 13.1.1 Thin provisioning defined
      2. 13.1.2 Thin provisioning architecture
    2. 13.2 Deduplication
      1. 13.2.1 How deduplication works
      2. 13.2.2 Deduplication and Infinite Volumes
      3. 13.2.3 Deduplication metadata
      4. 13.2.4 Guidelines for using deduplication
    3. 13.3 Compression
      1. 13.3.1 How compression works on Infinite Volumes
      2. 13.3.2 Detecting incompressible data
    4. 13.4 Storage efficiency on Infinite Volumes with storage classes
      1. 13.4.1 Configuring efficiency on an Infinite Volume with storage classes
      2. 13.4.2 Checking efficiency state on an Infinite Volume with storage classes
  21. Chapter 14. Data protection
    1. 14.1 Snapshot
    2. 14.2 Snapshot introduction
      1. 14.2.1 Key features of Snapshot software
      2. 14.2.2 User access to Snapshot copies
      3. 14.2.3 Maximum number of Snapshot copies
    3. 14.3 Creation of Snapshot copy schedules
      1. 14.3.1 Types of user-specified Snapshot copy schedules
      2. 14.3.2 Creating a Snapshot copy schedule
      3. 14.3.3 Deleting Snapshot copies automatically
    4. 14.4 Snapshot for Infinite Volume
      1. 14.4.1 Snapshot for FlexVol volume versus Infinite Volume
      2. 14.4.2 Snapshot copies for Infinite Volume states
      3. 14.4.3 Guidelines for working with Snapshot copies of Infinite Volumes
    5. 14.5 Snapshot process: Basic operation
    6. 14.6 Understanding Snapshots in detail
      1. 14.6.1 How Snapshot copies consume disk space
      2. 14.6.2 How changing file content consumes disk space
      3. 14.6.3 What the Snapshot copy reserve is
    7. 14.7 Snapshot data structures and algorithms
      1. 14.7.1 Creating a Snapshot
      2. 14.7.2 Deleting a Snapshot
    8. 14.8 SnapVault
    9. 14.9 SnapVault basics
      1. 14.9.1 SnapVault terms
      2. 14.9.2 Which data gets backed up and restored from a SnapVault backup
      3. 14.9.3 Which data does not get backed up to a SnapVault backup
      4. 14.9.4 Clustered Data ONTAP SnapVault highlights
    10. 14.10 7-Mode versus Clustered Data ONTAP SnapVault
    11. 14.11 How a SnapVault backup works
      1. 14.11.1 Baseline transfers
      2. 14.11.2 Incremental transfers
      3. 14.11.3 SnapVault backup updates
      4. 14.11.4 Data restore
      5. 14.11.5 SnapVault backups with data compression
      6. 14.11.6 Data protection of SVM namespace and root information
    12. 14.12 Supported data protection deployment configurations
      1. 14.12.1 Basic data protection configuration
      2. 14.12.2 Source to destination to tape backup
      3. 14.12.3 Mirror to mirror cascade
      4. 14.12.4 Mirror to SnapVault cascade
      5. 14.12.5 SnapVault to mirror cascade
      6. 14.12.6 Fan-in and fan-out deployments
    13. 14.13 Protecting data on FlexVol volumes by using SnapVault
      1. 14.13.1 Creating SnapVault backups on FlexVol volumes
      2. 14.13.2 Creating a SnapVault backup in an empty FlexVol volume
      3. 14.13.3 Creating the SnapVault relationship of a mirror-SnapVault cascade
      4. 14.13.4 Preserving a Snapshot copy on the primary source volume
      5. 14.13.5 Creating a SnapVault backup in a prepopulated FlexVol volume
      6. 14.13.6 Creating a destination baseline using a tape backup
      7. 14.13.7 Converting a data protection destination to a SnapVault secondary
    14. 14.14 Managing backup operations for SnapVault backups
      1. 14.14.1 How an out-of-order Snapshot copy transfer works
      2. 14.14.2 Backing up from a Snapshot copy that is older than base Snapshot copy
      3. 14.14.3 Backing up FlexVol volumes with the maximum limit of Snapshot copies
    15. 14.15 Managing restore operations for SnapVault backups
      1. 14.15.1 Guidelines for restoring the active file system
      2. 14.15.2 Guidelines for restoring LUNs in SAN environments
      3. 14.15.3 How restore operations work from a SnapVault backup
      4. 14.15.4 Restoring a volume from a SnapVault backup
      5. 14.15.5 Managing the SnapVault-mirror cascade when the SnapVault backup is unavailable
    16. 14.16 Managing storage efficiency for SnapVault secondaries
      1. 14.16.1 Guidelines for managing storage efficiency for SnapVault backups
      2. 14.16.2 Enabling storage efficiency on a SnapVault secondary volume
  22. Chapter 15. Disaster recovery
    1. 15.1 SnapMirror overview
    2. 15.2 SnapMirror Data Protection (SnapMirror DP)
      1. 15.2.1 SnapMirror data protection relationships
      2. 15.2.2 Scheduling SnapMirror updates
      3. 15.2.3 Converting a SnapMirror relationship to a SnapVault relationship
    3. 15.3 SnapMirror Load Sharing (SnapMirror LS)
      1. 15.3.1 Administering load-sharing mirrors
      2. 15.3.2 Accessing load-sharing mirror volumes
      3. 15.3.3 Load-sharing mirrors for storage virtual machine namespace root volumes
      4. 15.3.4 Load-sharing mirrors for read-only workloads
  23. Chapter 16. Performance considerations
    1. 16.1 FlexCache
      1. 16.1.1 Contents of a cached file
      2. 16.1.2 Serving read requests
      3. 16.1.3 Why using FlexCache volumes
      4. 16.1.4 Considerations for working with FlexCache volumes
      5. 16.1.5 Limitations of FlexCache volumes
      6. 16.1.6 Comparison of FlexCache volumes and load-sharing mirrors
    2. 16.2 Virtual Storage Tiering
    3. 16.3 Storage Quality of Service (QoS)
  24. Part 3 Cluster setup
  25. Chapter 17. Physical installation
    1. 17.1 Installation prerequisites
      1. 17.1.1 Pre-installation checklist
      2. 17.1.2 Before arriving on site
    2. 17.2 Configuration worksheet
    3. 17.3 Initial hardware setup
      1. 17.3.1 HA pairs
      2. 17.3.2 Cluster network
      3. 17.3.3 Switchless cluster
    4. 17.4 Setting up the cluster and joining nodes
      1. 17.4.1 Creating a cluster on one node
      2. 17.4.2 Joining a node to the cluster
    5. 17.5 Setting up the cluster base
      1. 17.5.1 Storage failover (SFO)
      2. 17.5.2 Synchronizing the system time across the cluster
      3. 17.5.3 Event management system
      4. 17.5.4 AutoSupport
      5. 17.5.5 Networking
      6. 17.5.6 Aggregates
    6. 17.6 Creating an SVM
      1. 17.6.1 Assigning a failover group
      2. 17.6.2 Assigning an export policy
      3. 17.6.3 Protecting the SVM root volume
    7. 17.7 Post-Installation and verification checklist
      1. 17.7.1 Physical installation
      2. 17.7.2 Cluster base
      3. 17.7.3 SVM checklist
  26. Chapter 18. Non-disruptive operations
    1. 18.1 Adding or removing a node
      1. 18.1.1 Adding a node
      2. 18.1.2 Removing a node
    2. 18.2 Software updates
  27. Chapter 19. Command Line Interface (CLI)
    1. 19.1 Introduction to CLI administration
    2. 19.2 New features in Clustered Data ONTAP CLI
    3. 19.3 Audit logging
    4. 19.4 Accessing the cluster by using SSH
    5. 19.5 Enabling Telnet or RSH access
      1. 19.5.1 Accessing the cluster by using Telnet
      2. 19.5.2 Accessing the cluster by using RSH
    6. 19.6 7-Mode to Clustered Data ONTAP
      1. 19.6.1 Configuration files
      2. 19.6.2 Commands
  28. Chapter 20. N series OnCommand System Manager 3.0
    1. 20.1 Introduction to N series OnCommand System Manager
    2. 20.2 Installing the N series OnCommand System Manager
      1. 20.2.1 Installing OnCommand System Manager on Windows
      2. 20.2.2 Installing OnCommand System Manager on Linux
    3. 20.3 Getting started with OnCommand System Manager
      1. 20.3.1 Starting OnCommand System Manager
      2. 20.3.2 Adding a storage system
      3. 20.3.3 Configuring a storage system
  29. Part 4 Storage virtual machine use cases
  30. Chapter 21. Data protection
    1. 21.1 Configuration workflow
    2. 21.2 Protecting a volume with SnapMirror
  31. Chapter 22. iSCSI/FC storage
    1. 22.1 Planning and checking the iSCSI environment
      1. 22.1.1 Checking your environment before configuration of iSCSI
    2. 22.2 Configuring iSCSI for both Windows 2008 and Clustered Data ONTAP
      1. 22.2.1 Creating an SVM for iSCSI
      2. 22.2.2 Configuring a Windows 2008 Host for iSCSI
      3. 22.2.3 Creating an iSCSI LUN
    3. 22.3 Accessing the iSCSI LUN on the Windows 2008 Host
    4. 22.4 Further information
  32. Chapter 23. CIFS storage
    1. 23.1 Planning and checking the CIFS environment
      1. 23.1.1 Checking your environment before configuration of CIFS
    2. 23.2 Configuring CIFS for both Windows 2008 and Clustered Data ONTAP
      1. 23.2.1 Creating an SVM for CIFS
      2. 23.2.2 Creating a NAS data LIF
      3. 23.2.3 Creating an export policy
      4. 23.2.4 Creating and exporting a volume
      5. 23.2.5 Creating CIFS shares
      6. 23.2.6 Mapping CIFS shares in a Windows 2008 host
    3. 23.3 Monitoring SMB statistics
      1. 23.3.1 Statistics with summary
      2. 23.3.2 Statistics at intervals
    4. 23.4 Further information
  33. Chapter 24. NFS storage
    1. 24.1 Planning and checking the NFS environment
      1. 24.1.1 Checking your environment before configuration of NFS
    2. 24.2 Configuring NFS for both Ubuntu Linux and Clustered Data ONTAP
      1. 24.2.1 Creating an SVM for NFS
      2. 24.2.2 Changing the default SVM properties
      3. 24.2.3 Creating an export policy
      4. 24.2.4 Creating an NFS volume
      5. 24.2.5 Mounting volumes on a UNIX host
    3. 24.3 Further information
  34. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications and IBM Redpaper publications
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  35. Back cover
  36. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  37. Notices
    1. Trademarks