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IBM System Storage b-type Multiprotocol Routing: An Introduction and Implementation

Book Description

The rapid spread and adoption of production storage area networks (SANs) has fueled the need for multiprotocol routers. The routers provide improved scalability, security, and manageability by enabling devices in separate SAN fabrics to communicate without merging fabrics into a single, large SAN fabric. This capability enables clients to initially deploy separate SAN solutions at the departmental and data center levels. Then, clients can consolidate these separate solutions into large enterprise SAN solutions as their experience and requirements grow and change.

Alternatively, multiprotocol routers can help to connect existing enterprise SANs for a variety of reasons. For instance, the introduction of Small Computer System Interface over IP (iSCSI) provides for the connection of low-end, low-cost hosts to enterprise SANs. The use of an Internet Protocol (IP) in the Fibre Channel (FC) environment provides for resource consolidation and disaster recovery planning over long distances. And the use of FC-FC routing services provides connectivity between two or more fabrics without having to merge them into a single SAN.

This IBM® Redbooks® publication targets storage network administrators, system designers, architects, and IT professionals who sell, design, or administer SANs. It introduces you to products, concepts, and technology in the IBM System Storage™ SAN Routing portfolio, which is based on Brocade products and technology. This book shows the features of these products and examples of how you can deploy and use them.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. The team who wrote this book
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Summary of changes
    1. March 2011, Fourth Edition
  5. Chapter 1. SAN routing introduction
    1. 1.1 SAN routing definitions
      1. 1.1.1 Fibre Channel
      2. 1.1.2 Fibre Channel switching
      3. 1.1.3 Fibre Channel routing
      4. 1.1.4 Tunneling
      5. 1.1.5 Routers and gateways
      6. 1.1.6 Fibre Channel routing between physical or virtual fabrics
    2. 1.2 Routed gateway protocols
      1. 1.2.1 Fibre Channel over Internet Protocol (FCIP)
      2. 1.2.2 iSCSI protocol
    3. 1.3 Routing issues
      1. 1.3.1 Packet size
      2. 1.3.2 TCP congestion control
      3. 1.3.3 Round-trip delay
      4. 1.3.4 Write acceleration
      5. 1.3.5 Tape acceleration
    4. 1.4 Multiprotocol scenarios
      1. 1.4.1 Dividing fabrics into sub-fabrics
      2. 1.4.2 Requirement to share devices across fabrics
      3. 1.4.3 Connecting a remote mirrored site over IP
      4. 1.4.4 Connecting hosts using iSCSI
  6. Chapter 2. Multiprotocol routing terminology and concepts
    1. 2.1 SAN multiprotocol routing terminology
      1. 2.1.1 Zone configurations
      2. 2.1.2 Fabric OS 6.4.0 changes
    2. 2.2 Overview of the FC-FC routing solution
    3. 2.3 iSCSI terms
  7. Chapter 3. b-type family multiprotocol routing products
    1. 3.1 IBM System Storage Multiprotocol routers
      1. 3.1.1 IBM System Storage SAN06B-R (2498-R06)
      2. 3.1.2 SAN18B-R and the SAN04B-R
    2. 3.2 IBM SAN Director blade options
      1. 3.2.1 FC Routing Blades
      2. 3.2.2 8 Gbps FC Routing Blade - FC 3890
      3. 3.2.3 4 Gbps FC Routing Blade
      4. 3.2.4 Integrated Routing in the SAN768B and SAN384B
      5. 3.2.5 iSCSI blade
    3. 3.3 Capabilities and limitations
      1. 3.3.1 FC-FC routing and FCIP distance extension
      2. 3.3.2 iSCSI
    4. 3.4 Product applications
      1. 3.4.1 SAN04B-R and SAN18B-R
      2. 3.4.2 FC Routing Blade for SAN768B, SAN384B, or SAN256B
      3. 3.4.3 iSCSI blade for the SAN256B
  8. Chapter 4. b-type family routing solutions
    1. 4.1 FC-FC routing
      1. 4.1.1 Local FC-FC routing
      2. 4.1.2 Fabric extension with FC-FC routing
    2. 4.2 QOS, DSCP, and VLANs
    3. 4.3 FCIP tunneling
      1. 4.3.1 FCIP support for IPSec
    4. 4.4 iSCSI gateway
  9. Chapter 5. b-type family multiprotocol routing best practices
    1. 5.1 Planning considerations
      1. 5.1.1 Piloting new technology
      2. 5.1.2 FC-FC routing considerations
      3. 5.1.3 FCIP tunneling considerations
      4. 5.1.4 Support services
    2. 5.2 MetaSAN design
    3. 5.3 Availability
    4. 5.4 Security
      1. 5.4.1 FC-FC routing security
      2. 5.4.2 FCIP tunneling security
      3. 5.4.3 iSCSI gateway security
    5. 5.5 Performance
      1. 5.5.1 FC-FC routing performance
      2. 5.5.2 FCIP tunneling performance
      3. 5.5.3 iSCSI performance
    6. 5.6 IP network issues
      1. 5.6.1 Link bandwidth
      2. 5.6.2 Link latency
      3. 5.6.3 TCP receive window
      4. 5.6.4 Packet loss rate
      5. 5.6.5 Out-of-order packet delivery
  10. Chapter 6. b-type family real-life routing solutions
    1. 6.1 Backup consolidation
      1. 6.1.1 Client environment and requirements
      2. 6.1.2 The solution
      3. 6.1.3 Failure scenarios
    2. 6.2 Migration to a new storage environment
      1. 6.2.1 Client environment and requirements
      2. 6.2.2 The solution
    3. 6.3 Long-distance disaster recovery over IP
      1. 6.3.1 Client environment and requirements
      2. 6.3.2 The solution
      3. 6.3.3 Normal operation
      4. 6.3.4 Failure scenarios
    4. 6.4 LAN-based users needing additional storage
      1. 6.4.1 Client environment and requirements
      2. 6.4.2 The solution
      3. 6.4.3 Normal operation
      4. 6.4.4 Failure scenarios
  11. Chapter 7. Multiprotocol routing basic implementation
    1. 7.1 Initial setup
    2. 7.2 Management tools introduction
      1. 7.2.1 Command-line interface
      2. 7.2.2 Web Tools
      3. 7.2.3 Data Center Fabric Manager
  12. Chapter 8. Routing in virtual fabrics
    1. 8.1 Routing and virtual fabrics
      1. 8.1.1 FC-FC routing and virtual fabrics
      2. 8.1.2 Logical switch configuration for FC routing
      3. 8.1.3 Backbone-to-edge routing with virtual fabrics
      4. 8.1.4 Virtual fabrics and FCIP
      5. 8.1.5 Lossless Dynamic Load Sharing in virtual fabrics
    2. 8.2 An example of routing in virtual fabrics
      1. 8.2.1 Scenario description
    3. 8.3 Summary
  13. Chapter 9. FC-FC routing implementation
    1. 9.1 Integrated Routing feature on 8 Gbps switches
    2. 9.2 Edge fabrics connected to backbone fabric through FCR
    3. 9.3 FC-FC routing service with CLI
      1. 9.3.1 Verifying the setup for FC-FC routing
      2. 9.3.2 Configuring backbone fabric ID
      3. 9.3.3 Configuring inter-fabric link (IFL)
      4. 9.3.4 Creating LSAN zones
    4. 9.4 Quality of Service (QOS) over FC-FC routing
      1. 9.4.1 Requirements for QOS over FCR
      2. 9.4.2 Steps to establish QOS over FCR
    5. 9.5 FC-FC routing service with Web Tools
      1. 9.5.1 Configuring backbone fabric ID
      2. 9.5.2 Configuring inter-fabric link
      3. 9.5.3 Creating LSAN zones
    6. 9.6 FC-FC routing service with DCFM
      1. 9.6.1 Creating LSAN zones
      2. 9.6.2 Configuring routing domain IDs
      3. 9.6.3 Showing FC-FC routing in DCFM
  14. Chapter 10. FCIP implementation
    1. 10.1 Recent changes in the FCIP implementation
      1. 10.1.1 Configuration guidelines
    2. 10.2 Configuring FCIP and LSAN
    3. 10.3 Initial tasks
      1. 10.3.1 Identifying HBA WWNs
      2. 10.3.2 Configuring storage
      3. 10.3.3 Checking the server
      4. 10.3.4 Checking the FCIP license
      5. 10.3.5 Enabling the FCR routing service
      6. 10.3.6 Enabling ports
    4. 10.4 Configuring FCIP using DCFM
      1. 10.4.1 Creating the FCIP tunnel
      2. 10.4.2 Checking the FCIP tunnel
      3. 10.4.3 Creating LSAN zones
    5. 10.5 Configuring FCIP using the CLI
      1. 10.5.1 Configuring the FCIP tunnel
      2. 10.5.2 Creating LSAN zones
    6. 10.6 Finalizing the configuration
      1. 10.6.1 Checking the server for new disks
      2. 10.6.2 Checking performance of the FCIP tunnel
  15. Chapter 11. iSCSI gateway implementation
    1. 11.1 Overview
    2. 11.2 Initial implementation
      1. 11.2.1 Setting up the basic lab
      2. 11.2.2 Configuring IP routes for the iSCSI GbE ports
      3. 11.2.3 Enabling connection redirection
      4. 11.2.4 Configuring the iSCSI initiator
    3. 11.3 Configuring the iSCSI gateway service
      1. 11.3.1 CHAP authentication
      2. 11.3.2 Configuring more iSCSI portals
      3. 11.3.3 Updating the iSCSI FC zone
      4. 11.3.4 LUN masking
      5. 11.3.5 Hierarchical LUN addressing
  16. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications
    2. Other resources
    3. Referenced web sites
    4. Help from IBM
  17. Back cover