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IBM Software for SAP Solutions

Book Description

SAP is a market leader in enterprise business application software. SAP solutions provide a rich set of composable application modules, and configurable functional capabilities that are expected from a comprehensive enterprise business application software suite.

In most cases, companies that adopt SAP software remain heterogeneous enterprises running both SAP and non-SAP systems to support their business processes. Regardless of the specific scenario, in heterogeneous enterprises most SAP implementations must be integrated with a variety of non-SAP enterprise systems:

  • Portals

  • Messaging infrastructure

  • Business process management (BPM) tools

  • Enterprise Content Management (ECM) methods and tools

  • Business analytics (BA) and business intelligence (BI) technologies

  • Security

  • Systems of record

  • Systems of engagement


  • The tooling included with SAP software addresses many needs for creating SAP-centric environments. However, the classic approach to implementing SAP functionality generally leaves the business with a rigid solution that is difficult and expensive to change and enhance.

    When SAP software is used in a large, heterogeneous enterprise environment, SAP clients face the dilemma of selecting the correct set of tools and platforms to implement SAP functionality, and to integrate the SAP solutions with non-SAP systems.

    This IBM® Redbooks® publication explains the value of integrating IBM software with SAP solutions. It describes how to enhance and extend pre-built capabilities in SAP software with best-in-class IBM enterprise software, enabling clients to maximize return on investment (ROI) in their SAP investment and achieve a balanced enterprise architecture approach. This book describes IBM Reference Architecture for SAP, a prescriptive blueprint for using IBM software in SAP solutions. The reference architecture is focused on defining the use of IBM software with SAP, and is not intended to address the internal aspects of SAP components.

    The chapters of this book provide a specific reference architecture for many of the architectural domains that are each important for a large enterprise to establish common strategy, efficiency, and balance. The majority of the most important architectural domain topics, such as integration, process optimization, master data management, mobile access, Enterprise Content Management, business intelligence, DevOps, security, systems monitoring, and so on, are covered in the book.

    However, there are several other architectural domains which are not included in the book. This is not to imply that these other architectural domains are not important or are less important, or that IBM does not offer a solution to address them. It is only reflective of time constraints, available resources, and the complexity of assembling a book on an extremely broad topic.

    Although more content could have been added, the authors feel confident that the scope of architectural material that has been included should provide organizations with a fantastic head start in defining their own enterprise reference architecture for many of the important architectural domains, and it is hoped that this book provides great value to those reading it.

    This IBM Redbooks publication is targeted to the following audiences:

  • Client decision makers and solution architects leading enterprise transformation projects and wanting to gain further insight so that they can benefit from the integration of IBM software in large-scale SAP projects.

  • IT architects and consultants integrating IBM technology with SAP solutions.

  • Table of Contents

    1. Front cover
    2. Notices
      1. Trademarks
    3. IBM Redbooks promotions
    4. Preface
      1. Authors
      2. Now you can become a published author, too!
      3. Comments welcome
      4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
    5. Chapter 1. Why IBM software matters in SAP solutions
      1. 1.1 Overview
      2. 1.2 Critical success factors for an SAP-centric transformation
        1. 1.2.1 Deploying a system of engagement for SAP
        2. 1.2.2 Balancing SAP with an application-independent, industry-leading integration platform solution
        3. 1.2.3 Establishing governance for architectural decisions
        4. 1.2.4 Avoiding custom coding
      3. 1.3 Combined value of IBM and SAP software
        1. 1.3.1 Reduced business and IT risk
        2. 1.3.2 Accelerated SAP integration into a heterogeneous enterprise
        3. 1.3.3 Business agility
        4. 1.3.4 Cost reduction
    6. Chapter 2. IBM Reference Architecture for SAP
      1. 2.1 Overview
      2. 2.2 Architecture goals
        1. 2.2.1 Use standard, non-customized SAP applications
        2. 2.2.2 Reuse pre-built SAP integration
        3. 2.2.3 Use best-in-class technologies when extending beyond the SAP domain
        4. 2.2.4 Use open, well-established standards
        5. 2.2.5 Use pre-built software capabilities provided by IBM
      3. 2.3 IBM Reference Architecture for SAP overview
        1. 2.3.1 Systems of engagement, interaction, and record
        2. 2.3.2 Services view
        3. 2.3.3 Application integration: Inner ring and outer ring architecture
        4. 2.3.4 Enterprise integration services
        5. 2.3.5 Process optimization
        6. 2.3.6 User interface
        7. 2.3.7 Master data management
        8. 2.3.8 Enterprise content management
        9. 2.3.9 Business analytics
        10. 2.3.10 DevOps for SAP
    7. Chapter 3. Enterprise integration services for SAP
      1. 3.1 Introduction to enterprise integration services for SAP applications
      2. 3.2 Architecture goals
        1. 3.2.1 Align enterprise integration services with SAP implementation methodology
        2. 3.2.2 Use best-in-class technologies for custom integration development
        3. 3.2.3 Minimize costs of integration for non-strategic systems
        4. 3.2.4 Loosely-coupled applications
        5. 3.2.5 Use open, well-established standards
      3. 3.3 Scenarios and patterns for ongoing integration with SAP
        1. 3.3.1 Identifying integration scenarios
        2. 3.3.2 Common integration patterns
      4. 3.4 Architecture overview of ongoing integration with SAP
      5. 3.5 Architecture components of ongoing integration with SAP
        1. 3.5.1 Enterprise Service Bus
        2. 3.5.2 Extract, transform, and load
        3. 3.5.3 Service governance
        4. 3.5.4 Reliable File Transfer
        5. 3.5.5 Process services
        6. 3.5.6 Logging and error handling
        7. 3.5.7 Integration workload placement guidelines: ESB versus ETL
      6. 3.6 Initial data load
      7. 3.7 References
    8. Chapter 4. Process optimization for SAP
      1. 4.1 SAP solutions as a system of engagement
      2. 4.2 Architecture overview
      3. 4.3 SAP active business performance optimization architecture
      4. 4.4 IBM Smarter Process for SAP capabilities
        1. 4.4.1 SAP Solution Manager integration
        2. 4.4.2 SAP Guided Workflow
        3. 4.4.3 Process orchestration, integration, and event management
        4. 4.4.4 Process discovery and monitoring
        5. 4.4.5 Iterative business blueprinting
        6. 4.4.6 Decision automation
        7. 4.4.7 Process automation
      5. 4.5 IBM Smarter Process for SAP products and solutions
      6. 4.6 How IBM Smarter Process for SAP creates sustained business value
      7. 4.7 IBM Smarter Process for SAP usage scenarios
        1. 4.7.1 IBM Smarter Process for SAP in the phases of an SAP project
        2. 4.7.2 Post-implementation value augmentation
      8. 4.8 Conclusion
        1. 4.8.1 Capability and value summary
        2. 4.8.2 IBM Smarter Process for SAP Affinity Analysis and Business Value Assessment Workshop
      9. 4.9 Other IBM Software Group publications, assets, and tools
      10. 4.10 IBM Global Business Services SAP assets and tools
      11. 4.11 References
    9. Chapter 5. Mobile access for SAP
      1. 5.1 IBM MobileFirst overview
      2. 5.2 Spectrum of mobile app development approaches
      3. 5.3 IBM MobileFirst for SAP architectures
        1. 5.3.1 Architecture goals for SAP mobile enablement in a heterogeneous enterprise
        2. 5.3.2 IBM MobileFirst for SAP architecture overview
        3. 5.3.3 Fast-track SAP mobile enablement with IBM Worklight and SAP NetWeaver Gateway
        4. 5.3.4 IBM MobileFirst integration with SAP with no moving parts
        5. 5.3.5 Accelerated mobile integration with SAP using IBM WebSphere Cast Iron
        6. 5.3.6 Full featured mobile integration with SAP using IBM Integration Bus
        7. 5.3.7 Access to existing SAP Fiori Apps using IBM MaaS360
      4. 5.4 Optional components driving enhanced features in mobile architectures
        1. 5.4.1 Enhancing mobile architectures by adding IBM API Management capabilities
        2. 5.4.2 Enhancing mobile architectures by adding IBM mobile analytics and quality assurance capabilities
        3. 5.4.3 Enhancing mobile architectures by adding secure offline capabilities
      5. 5.5 Lessons learned from actual projects
        1. 5.5.1 Direct connectivity from mobile applications to SAP is rarely used
        2. 5.5.2 Late decision on native versus hybrid apps
        3. 5.5.3 Adding mobile business analytics features dynamically
        4. 5.5.4 Separation of security domains
      6. 5.6 References
    10. Chapter 6. Portal integration with SAP
      1. 6.1 Overview of integrating IBM WebSphere Portal with SAP applications
      2. 6.2 Architecture overview
      3. 6.3 Types of use cases
        1. 6.3.1 Casual use cases
        2. 6.3.2 Detailed use cases
      4. 6.4 WebSphere Portal integration with SAP app use cases
        1. 6.4.1 Federated portal
        2. 6.4.2 Integrating with the web application bridge feature
        3. 6.4.3 Integrating with IBM WebSphere Portal Integrator for SAP
        4. 6.4.4 Integrating with Web Services for Remote Portlets (WSRP)
      5. 6.5 Service-level integration
        1. 6.5.1 Direct integration with SAP applications using SAP Java connector
        2. 6.5.2 Integrating with an enterprise service bus to connect to SAP applications
        3. 6.5.3 Integrating with SAP NetWeaver Gateway
      6. 6.6 Architecture guidelines
      7. 6.7 Summary
      8. 6.8 References
    11. Chapter 7. Master data management for SAP
      1. 7.1 Master data management introduction
      2. 7.2 Why master data management is important for SAP applications
      3. 7.3 Overview of IBM Master Data Management capabilities
      4. 7.4 Architecture goals
      5. 7.5 Architecture overview
      6. 7.6 IBM InfoSphere MDM for SAP applications
      7. 7.7 Architecture patterns
        1. 7.7.1 Master Data Integration
        2. 7.7.2 Master data distribution
        3. 7.7.3 MDM hub patterns and MDM implementation styles
        4. 7.7.4 Selecting MDM hub and MDM implementation styles for environments with SAP applications
      8. 7.8 References
    12. Chapter 8. Enterprise Content Management for SAP
      1. 8.1 Enterprise content management business goals
        1. 8.1.1 Information lifecycle management: More than just archiving
        2. 8.1.2 Information lifecycle governance applied to SAP systems
        3. 8.1.3 IBM proposes a base structure of an integrated ECM solution
      2. 8.2 ECM for SAP use cases and solution architecture
        1. 8.2.1 SAP archiving standards
        2. 8.2.2 SAP archiving use cases
        3. 8.2.3 Architecture of IBM Content Collector for SAP Applications
        4. 8.2.4 IBM Datacap Taskmaster Capture
        5. 8.2.5 IBM Content Navigator
      3. 8.3 Business process enhancements through ECM for SAP solutions
        1. 8.3.1 Objectives of a document-oriented workflow management
        2. 8.3.2 SAP-centric versus ECM-centric process management
        3. 8.3.3 Components of an ECM for SAP Solution
        4. 8.3.4 Capturing solution components
        5. 8.3.5 ECM SAP solution architecture
      4. 8.4 Data governance: Managing growth and compliance
        1. 8.4.1 Business drivers
        2. 8.4.2 SAP infrastructure for data archiving
        3. 8.4.3 Data archiving and the choice of IBM ECM content repositories
        4. 8.4.4 SAP ArchiveLink-based data archiving
        5. 8.4.5 Data archiving using SAP ILM
        6. 8.4.6 Comparison of SAP ArchiveLink and ILM-based data archiving
        7. 8.4.7 Adding the value of IBM middleware and storage solutions for SAP data archiving purposes
      5. 8.5 References
    13. Chapter 9. IBM Business Analytics infrastructure for SAP
      1. 9.1 IBM Business Analytics infrastructure for SAP value proposition
        1. 9.1.1 Architecture overview
      2. 9.2 IBM Business Analytics integration architectures
        1. 9.2.1 IBM Enterprise Data Warehouse products
        2. 9.2.2 IBM InfoSphere DataStage
        3. 9.2.3 IBM InfoSphere Data Replication
      3. 9.3 Detailed review of IBM Business Analytics integration architectures for SAP
        1. 9.3.1 Data export from SAP Business Suite into an IBM enterprise data warehouse
        2. 9.3.2 Data export from SAP BW into an IBM EDW
        3. 9.3.3 Operational analytics with Cognos Business Intelligence directly accessing SAP solutions
        4. 9.3.4 Managing business performance with SAP and IBM Cognos TM1
        5. 9.3.5 Predictive analytics with SAP
      4. 9.4 Conclusion
      5. 9.5 References
    14. Chapter 10. DevOps for SAP
      1. 10.1 IBM DevOps for SAP overview
        1. 10.1.1 IBM DevOps for SAP key capabilities
      2. 10.2 Application lifecycle management for SAP
        1. 10.2.1 IBM Rational Connector for SAP Solution Manager
        2. 10.2.2 Requirements management
        3. 10.2.3 Blueprint push from SAP Solution Manager
        4. 10.2.4 Project planning and execution
        5. 10.2.5 Change, defect, and incident management
        6. 10.2.6 Quality management
        7. 10.2.7 Impact analysis
      3. 10.3 Collaborative development for SAP
        1. 10.3.1 Improve SAP developer and team productivity
        2. 10.3.2 Real-time visibility into SAP Agile delivery and maintenance projects
        3. 10.3.3 Accelerate agile development adoption and results
      4. 10.4 Continuous testing for SAP
        1. 10.4.1 Functional testing
        2. 10.4.2 Integration testing and service virtualization
        3. 10.4.3 Performance testing
      5. 10.5 Continuous release and deployment for SAP
      6. 10.6 Continuous business planning for SAP
        1. 10.6.1 Enterprise architecture
      7. 10.7 Summary
      8. 10.8 References
    15. Chapter 11. Systems security for SAP
      1. 11.1 SAP systems and IBM security management integration overview
        1. 11.1.1 Key capabilities: Logical components of security reference architecture
        2. 11.1.2 Mapping logical security architecture components to IBM and SAP software
      2. 11.2 SAP systems security and IBM security management integration scenarios
        1. 11.2.1 Key solution components
        2. 11.2.2 Generic components and concepts of a security architecture
      3. 11.3 Identity system scenarios
        1. 11.3.1 Identity management scenario
        2. 11.3.2 Identity feed scenario
        3. 11.3.3 User provisioning scenario
      4. 11.4 Authentication system scenarios
        1. 11.4.1 Access management scenario
        2. 11.4.2 Single sign-on scenario
        3. 11.4.3 Identity propagation scenario
      5. 11.5 Authorization system scenario
      6. 11.6 Audit system scenarios
        1. 11.6.1 Security monitoring and analytics scenario
        2. 11.6.2 Source code analysis scenario
      7. 11.7 Identity management products and solutions
        1. 11.7.1 IBM Security Identity Manager
        2. 11.7.2 IBM Security Directory Integrator
        3. 11.7.3 IBM Security Directory Server
      8. 11.8 Access management products and solutions
        1. 11.8.1 IBM Security Access Manager for Enterprise Single Sign-On
        2. 11.8.2 IBM Security Access Manager for Web
        3. 11.8.3 IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager
      9. 11.9 Audit products and solutions
        1. 11.9.1 IBM InfoSphere Guardium
        2. 11.9.2 IBM Security QRadar Log Manager
        3. 11.9.3 IBM Security QRadar Risk Manager
        4. 11.9.4 IBM Security QRadar SIEM
        5. 11.9.5 IBM Security AppScan
      10. 11.10 References
    16. Chapter 12. Systems management for SAP
      1. 12.1 Architectural goals
        1. 12.1.1 Enable optimal availability and usability of complex business systems
        2. 12.1.2 Provide visibility to unplanned business process outages
        3. 12.1.3 Enable historical view of business process availability
      2. 12.2 Business process availability management overview
        1. 12.2.1 Complex IT solutions require multiple levels of systems management
        2. 12.2.2 Multiple systems management tools exist for each layer of solution
        3. 12.2.3 Systems management considerations
      3. 12.3 Systems management reference architecture for SAP-centric solutions
        1. 12.3.1 Application architecture
        2. 12.3.2 Infrastructure architecture
        3. 12.3.3 Systems management architecture
      4. 12.4 Business process availability management for SAP-centric solutions
        1. 12.4.1 Business process availability management architecture
        2. 12.4.2 Business Process DLA overview
      5. 12.5 Summary
      6. 12.6 References
    17. Related publications
      1. IBM Redbooks
      2. Other publications
      3. Online resources
      4. Help from IBM
    18. Back cover
    19. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
      1. Introduction
      2. Business problem and business value
      3. Reference architecture use
      4. Requirements
      5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
      6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
      7. Deployment considerations
      8. Customizing the predefined configurations
      9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
      10. References
      11. The team who wrote this paper
      12. Now you can become a published author, too!
      13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
    20. Notices
      1. Trademarks