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IBM Software Defined Environment

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication introduces the IBM Software Defined Environment (SDE) solution, which helps to optimize the entire computing infrastructure--compute, storage, and network resources--so that it can adapt to the type of work required. In today's environment, resources are assigned manually to workloads, but that happens automatically in a SDE. In an SDE, workloads are dynamically assigned to IT resources based on application characteristics, best-available resources, and service level policies so that they deliver continuous, dynamic optimization and reconfiguration to address infrastructure issues. Underlying all of this are policy-based compliance checks and updates in a centrally managed environment.

Readers get a broad introduction to the new architecture. Think integration, automation, and optimization. Those are enablers of cloud delivery and analytics. SDE can accelerate business success by matching workloads and resources so that you have a responsive, adaptive environment. With the IBM Software Defined Environment, infrastructure is fully programmable to rapidly deploy workloads on optimal resources and to instantly respond to changing business demands.

This information is intended for IBM sales representatives, IBM software architects, IBM Systems Technology Group brand specialists, distributors, resellers, and anyone who is developing or implementing SDE.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. IBM Redbooks promotions
  4. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  5. Chapter 1. Introduction to the IBM Software Defined Environment
    1. 1.1 Characteristics of the Software Defined Environment
    2. 1.2 The “software-defined everything” vision
    3. 1.3 Infrastructure matters
    4. 1.4 Purpose of this Redbooks publication
    5. 1.5 Scope of the SDE solution
    6. 1.6 Supporting technologies
      1. 1.6.1 Cloud workload orchestration and management
      2. 1.6.2 IBM pattern engine strategy
      3. 1.6.3 SDE service orchestration
      4. 1.6.4 IBM UrbanCode Deploy
    7. 1.7 Software Defined Compute
      1. 1.7.1 PowerVM
      2. 1.7.2 PowerKVM
      3. 1.7.3 Kernel-based virtualization
    8. 1.8 IBM z/VM
    9. 1.9 Hyper-V
    10. 1.10 ESX
    11. 1.11 Software-defined storage
      1. 1.11.1 IBM SAN Volume Controller
      2. 1.11.2 IBM Storwize V7000
      3. 1.11.3 IBM XIV
      4. 1.11.4 IBM Spectrum Scale (was IBM General Parallel File System, or GPFS)
      5. 1.11.5 IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments
    12. 1.12 Scenarios for an example company
      1. 1.12.1 Enable line-of-business cloud users
      2. 1.12.2 Business expansion: Advanced orchestration
    13. 1.13 Deploy and managing clouds
      1. 1.13.1 Cloud provider advanced automation and orchestration
    14. 1.14 Benefits and outcomes
  6. Chapter 2. Reference architecture framework and methods
    1. 2.1 Various definitions of reference architecture
    2. 2.2 The Enterprise Technology Framework
    3. 2.3 Approaches and methods
      1. 2.3.1 The core
      2. 2.3.2 The hybrid core
      3. 2.3.3 Benefits of reference architectures
  7. Chapter 3. SDE reference architecture
    1. 3.1 A closer look at SDE reference architecture
      1. 3.1.1 Relationship with the IBM Cloud Enabled Data Center and cloud computing reference architecture
      2. 3.1.2 SDE reference architecture, logical view
      3. 3.1.3 SDE reference architecture with OpenStack integration
    2. 3.2 SDE with OpenStack reference security architecture
      1. 3.2.1 IBM dynamic cloud security portfolio
    3. 3.3 Servers: x86, Power Systems, System z
      1. 3.3.1 x3500 7839 series
      2. 3.3.2 x3950 Series 7233 Series
    4. 3.4 Hypervisors xKVM, PowerKVM, PowerVM, z/VM, VMware
      1. 3.4.1 xKVM
      2. 3.4.2 KVM cloud network topology
      3. 3.4.3 PowerKVM
      4. 3.4.4 PowerVM
      5. 3.4.5 Architecture and solution context
      6. 3.4.6 Virtual I/O Server in relation to the PowerVM hypervisor and virtualization
      7. 3.4.7 Power Systems network virtualization
      8. 3.4.8 System z virtual machine, z/VM
    5. 3.5 Storage GPFS, GPFS Storage Server, XIV, V7K, DS8K
      1. 3.5.1 IBM Spectrum Scale
      2. 3.5.2 IBM software-defined storage vision within SDE
      3. 3.5.3 Spectrum Scale use cases
      4. 3.5.4 IBM Spectrum Scale architecture
      5. 3.5.5 System x GPFS Storage Server
      6. 3.5.6 IBM XIV storage
      7. 3.5.7 IBM Storwize V7000 storage systems
      8. 3.5.8 IBM System Storage DS8000 series (DS8K)
    6. 3.6 Examples
      1. 3.6.1 Three-tier commerce transactional workload
      2. 3.6.2 Big data analytics workloads
      3. 3.6.3 The IBM business analytics and optimization capabilities
  8. Chapter 4. Cloud provider installation guidelines and implementation scenarios
    1. 4.1 Structure of the IBM Cloud Manager installation
    2. 4.2 Cloud installation
    3. 4.3 Cloud setup for this publication
      1. 4.3.1 Hardware and software setup for this publication
      2. 4.3.2 Cloud topology for this publication
    4. 4.4 Deployment server installation
      1. 4.4.1 IBM Cloud Manager hardware prerequisites
      2. 4.4.2 Create the virtual machine to host the Cloud Manager deployment server
      3. 4.4.3 Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux
      4. 4.4.4 Customize Red Hat Enterprise Linux to host the deployment server
      5. 4.4.5 Install IBM Cloud Manager 4.1 on the deployment server
      6. 4.4.6 Update the Cloud Manager to the latest level
    5. 4.5 Deploy the Controller node
      1. 4.5.1 Hardware prerequisites for the Controller node
      2. 4.5.2 Create the logical partition to host the Controller node
      3. 4.5.3 Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux
      4. 4.5.4 Customize Red Hat Enterprise Linux to host the Controller node
      5. 4.5.5 Network considerations and requirements
      6. 4.5.6 Configure network interfaces in the Controller node
      7. 4.5.7 Deploying the Controller node
    6. 4.6 Add KVM Compute nodes to the cloud
      1. 4.6.1 Verify software prerequisites for KVM Compute nodes
      2. 4.6.2 Enable KVM support on your hardware
      3. 4.6.3 Install Red Hat Enterprise Linux on the physical host
      4. 4.6.4 Customize RHEL to meet the IBM Cloud Manager requirements
      5. 4.6.5 Configure management and data network interfaces
      6. 4.6.6 Set up a Yum repository
      7. 4.6.7 Install KVM packages on the physical host
      8. 4.6.8 Deploy the KVM Compute node using the deployment server
    7. 4.7 Add PowerKVM Compute nodes to the cloud
      1. 4.7.1 Prerequisites for PowerKVM Compute nodes
      2. 4.7.2 Verify that your hardware supports PowerKVM
      3. 4.7.3 Enable PowerKVM in Advanced System Management Interface (ASMI)
      4. 4.7.4 Install IBM PowerKVM
      5. 4.7.5 Customize PowerKVM to meet the Cloud Manager requirements
      6. 4.7.6 Configuring management and data network interfaces
      7. 4.7.7 Deploy the PowerKVM Compute node using the deployment server
      8. 4.7.8 Enable the Kimchi console in nova configuration file (optional)
    8. 4.8 Add PowerVM Compute nodes to the cloud
      1. 4.8.1 Prerequisites for PowerVM Compute nodes
      2. 4.8.2 Set up Virtual I/O Servers
      3. 4.8.3 Set up the IBM Power Virtualization Center
      4. 4.8.4 Add PowerVM Compute nodes to the OpenStack cloud
    9. 4.9 Enable the self-service portal
      1. 4.9.1 Prepare the environment (env.json) file
      2. 4.9.2 Prepare the topology (topo.json) file
      3. 4.9.3 Use the knife command to update your cloud topology
      4. 4.9.4 Connect the self-service portal to your OpenStack cloud
      5. 4.9.5 Install the IBM Cloud Manager license
    10. 4.10 Network configuration in IBM Cloud Manager
      1. 4.10.1 Open vSwitch
      2. 4.10.2 Shared Ethernet Adapters
      3. 4.10.3 Network configuration overview
      4. 4.10.4 Create networks in IBM Cloud Manager
      5. 4.10.5 Network setup in the cloud prepared for this publication
    11. 4.11 Storage configuration in IBM Cloud Manager
      1. 4.11.1 Integrate Cinder with Logical Volume Manager
      2. 4.11.2 Integrate Cinder with SAN Volume Controller or Storwize V7000
      3. 4.11.3 Integrate Cinder with Power Virtualization Center (PowerVC)
      4. 4.11.4 Integrate Cinder with IBM Spectrum Scale
      5. 4.11.5 Integrate Cinder with Network File System
    12. 4.12 Manage images in IBM Cloud Manager
      1. 4.12.1 Manage images in KVM and PowerKVM Compute nodes
      2. 4.12.2 Manage images in PowerVM Compute nodes
    13. 4.13 Manage instances in IBM Cloud Manager
      1. 4.13.1 Manage instances by using Cloud Management dashboard
      2. 4.13.2 Manage instances using self-service portal
      3. 4.13.3 Manage instances using the command-line interface
      4. 4.13.4 Identify an instance in the Compute node
    14. 4.14 Manage flavors in IBM Cloud Manager
      1. 4.14.1 Create flavors for KVM and PowerKVM Compute nodes
      2. 4.14.2 Create flavors for PowerVM Compute nodes
    15. 4.15 Use SSH key pairs in IBM Cloud Manager
      1. 4.15.1 Create key pairs
      2. 4.15.2 Inject key pairs in instances
    16. 4.16 Developer tool installation: UrbanCode Deploy with Patterns
  9. Chapter 5. IBM big data and analytics capabilities
    1. 5.1 Logical architecture
    2. 5.2 IBM big data and analytics portfolio
      1. 5.2.1 Data sources (1)
      2. 5.2.2 Analytical sources (2)
      3. 5.2.3 IBM actionable insights (3)
      4. 5.2.4 New and enhanced applications (4)
      5. 5.2.5 On-premises or hybrid clouds and as-a-service capabilities (5)
    3. 5.3 Big data use cases
      1. 5.3.1 Big data exploration use case
      2. 5.3.2 Enhanced 360° View of the Customer use case
      3. 5.3.3 For more examples
  10. Chapter 6. Advanced cloud provider scenarios
    1. 6.1 IBM Platform Resource Scheduler
      1. 6.1.1 IBM Platform Resource Scheduler overview
      2. 6.1.2 The Enterprise Grid Orchestrator
      3. 6.1.3 Platform Resource Scheduler installation
      4. 6.1.4 Using PRS
      5. 6.1.5 Platform Resource Scheduler use example
    2. 6.2 Manual compute and storage expansion
      1. 6.2.1 Manual compute expansion
      2. 6.2.2 Manual storage expansion
  11. Chapter 7. Cloud user deployment and use scenarios
    1. 7.1 Heat engine and HOT templates
      1. 7.1.1 HOT template structure
      2. 7.1.2 Creating a sample HOT template
      3. 7.1.3 Create the Stack in Cloud Management dashboard
    2. 7.2 IBM UrbanCode Deploy with Patterns
      1. 7.2.1 Creating the versioner agent in IBM UrbanCode Deploy
      2. 7.2.2 Connect IBM UrbanCode Deploy with Patterns to the OpenStack cloud
      3. 7.2.3 Deploying environments in UrbanCode Deploy with Patterns
      4. 7.2.4 Creating components and applications in UrbanCode Deploy
      5. 7.2.5 Exporting and importing components from UrbanCode Deploy
      6. 7.2.6 Deploying environments in UrbanCode Deploy with Patterns using components created in UrbanCode Deploy
      7. 7.2.7 Importing blueprint definitions in IBM UrbanCode Deploy with Patterns
      8. 7.2.8 Required corrections in the cloud setup for this publication
    3. 7.3 IBM BigInsights big data analytics software
    4. 7.4 Acme Air scenario
      1. 7.4.1 DevOps Pro (Maureen) provisions an application to the hybrid cloud
      2. 7.4.2 Infrastructure Administrator (Michael) inspects and configures the hybrid cloud
      3. 7.4.3 Cloud users interact with a mobile application
      4. 7.4.4 Cloud user interactions with the reservations application
      5. 7.4.5 AcmeAirDataScale-PowerKVM.yaml file (HOT template)
      6. 7.4.6 Section summary
    5. 7.5 High availability for applications
      1. 7.5.1 Introduction to OpenStack High Availability
      2. 7.5.2 Stateless versus stateful services
      3. 7.5.3 Active/passive configuration
      4. 7.5.4 Active/active configuration
  12. Chapter 8. Recently released architecture and future direction
    1. 8.1 Software-defined infrastructure: Next generation
      1. 8.1.1 Workload engines
      2. 8.1.2 Resource management
      3. 8.1.3 OpenStack: Juno, latest release information
      4. 8.1.4 Next-generation architecture for information and insights
  13. Appendix A. IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments
    1. Software-defined networking overview and relationship to SDE
    2. SDN reference architecture and standards
    3. IBM Software Defined Network for Virtual Environments context
    4. IBM SDN scenarios and use cases
    5. SDN installation process of the SDN VE and DOVE components
  14. Appendix B. Cloud computing review
    1. Types of clouds
    2. Types of cloud services
    3. How technical computing fits into cloud deployment models
    4. Six steps toward cloud computing
    5. The result: Dynamic cloud through Software Defined Environments
  15. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  16. Back cover