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IBM MQ V8 Features and Enhancements

Book Description

The power of IBM® MQ is its flexibility combined with reliability, scalability, and security. This flexibility provides a large number of design and implementation choices. Making informed decisions from this range of choices can simplify the development of applications and the administration of an MQ messaging infrastructure.

Applications that access such an infrastructure can be developed using a wide range of programming paradigms and languages. These applications can run within a substantial array of software and hardware environments. Customers can use IBM MQ to integrate and extend the capabilities of existing and varied infrastructures in the information technology (IT) system of a business.

IBM MQ V8.0 was released in June 2014. Before that release, the product name was IBM WebSphere® MQ.

This IBM Redbooks® publication covers the core enhancements made in IBM MQ V8 and the concepts that must be understood. A broad understanding of the product features is key to making informed design and implementation choices for both the infrastructure and the applications that access it. Details of new areas of function for IBM MQ are introduced throughout this book, such as the changes to security, publish/subscribe clusters, and IBM System z exploitation.

This book is for individuals and organizations who make informed decisions about design and applications before implementing an IBM MQ infrastructure or begin development of an IBM MQ application.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Part 1 Introducing IBM MQ V8 and new features
  5. Chapter 1. Introduction
    1. 1.1 What is IBM MQ
      1. 1.1.1 Product release timeline
    2. 1.2 What is new in IBM MQ V8
      1. 1.2.1 Security
      2. 1.2.2 Performance and scalability
      3. 1.2.3 System z exploitation
      4. 1.2.4 Cross-product consistency
      5. 1.2.5 Usability
      6. 1.2.6 Platforms: 64-bit and 32-bit
      7. 1.2.7 Standards and APIs
    3. 1.3 Supported environments
  6. Chapter 2. Topic host routed publish/subscribe
    1. 2.1 Introduction
      1. 2.1.1 The example case
      2. 2.1.2 Terminology
    2. 2.2 Distributed publish/subscribe topologies
      1. 2.2.1 Proxy subscriptions
      2. 2.2.2 Hierarchies
      3. 2.2.3 Clusters
      4. 2.2.4 Direct routed clustered topics
      5. 2.2.5 Topic host routed clustered topics
    3. 2.3 Comparison of topologies
      1. 2.3.1 Scaling
      2. 2.3.2 Availability
      3. 2.3.3 Publication flows
      4. 2.3.4 Configuration
      5. 2.3.5 Comparison summary
    4. 2.4 Performance tips
    5. 2.5 Problem determination
  7. Chapter 3. User authentication
    1. 3.1 Introduction to authentication
      1. 3.1.1 IBM MQ history
    2. 3.2 Identity repositories
    3. 3.3 Relationship to authorization
    4. 3.4 Administration for authentication
      1. 3.4.1 AUTHINFO objects
      2. 3.4.2 Simple example
    5. 3.5 Application programming for authentication
      1. 3.5.1 MQI
    6. 3.6 JMS and XMS
    7. 3.7 XA Transaction managers
    8. 3.8 Relationship to CHLAUTH rules
    9. 3.9 Using the mqccred channel security exit
    10. 3.10 Password protection on the network
    11. 3.11 Using authentication in programs provided by MQ
    12. 3.12 Solving authentication failures
    13. 3.13 Summary
  8. Chapter 4. TLS/SSL Digital Certificate Management
    1. 4.1 Basic security concepts
    2. 4.2 Multiple certificates and names for digital certificates
    3. 4.3 The CERTLABL parameter
    4. 4.4 Using SSLCERTI to ensure the correct certificate is used
      1. 4.4.1 Client configuration for CERTLABL attribute
      2. 4.4.2 Summary
    5. 4.5 Scenario and examples to enable TLS/SSL digital certificates on channels
      1. 4.5.1 Creating a key ring and digital certificate on a z/OS queue manager
      2. 4.5.2 Using SSLCERTI for Certificate Issuer checking
    6. 4.6 Additional TLS/SSL improvements across platforms
  9. Part 2 New for z/OS
  10. Chapter 5. Buffer pool enhancements
    1. 5.1 Available buffer pools increased to 100
      1. 5.1.1 Implementation of buffer pools in the range of 16 - 99
    2. 5.2 Buffer pools above the bar
      1. 5.2.1 Benefits of extended buffer pools
      2. 5.2.2 Planning and Implementation of buffer pools above the bar
      3. 5.2.3 Command changes
    3. 5.3 Use cases for buffer pool enhancements
      1. 5.3.1 Using buffer pools 16 - 99
      2. 5.3.2 Using above-the-bar buffer pools
      3. 5.3.3 Virtual storage constraint relief below the bar
      4. 5.3.4 Additional queue manager capacity
      5. 5.3.5 Deeper in-memory queues
    4. 5.4 System Management Facilities (SMF) changes
    5. 5.5 Expanded buffer pool use cases
    6. 5.6 New Buffer Manager messages
    7. 5.7 Summary
  11. Chapter 6. Extending the log RBA and conversion
    1. 6.1 What is a log RBA
    2. 6.2 Changes to log RBA
      1. 6.2.1 Warning messages
      2. 6.2.2 Warning thresholds
      3. 6.2.3 Reset or extend: Options when log RBA nears end of range
    3. 6.3 Converting to use 8-byte log RBA
      1. 6.3.1 Be aware of certain issues
      2. 6.3.2 Suggestions
    4. 6.4 Scenario
  12. Chapter 7. SMF changes: Channel initiator statistics and channel accounting
    1. 7.1 Introduction to the channel initiator (CHINIT)
    2. 7.2 SMF reports
    3. 7.3 Channel initiator statistics
      1. 7.3.1 How channel initiator statistics are defined
      2. 7.3.2 Starting the channel initiator statistics
      3. 7.3.3 How the channel initiator statistics can be used
    4. 7.4 Channel accounting
      1. 7.4.1 How channel initiator accounting records are defined
      2. 7.4.2 Starting the channel accounting collection
      3. 7.4.3 How accounting information can be used
      4. 7.4.4 The channel accounting reports
    5. 7.5 Summary
  13. Chapter 8. Using new System z features
    1. 8.1 SCM and its use by z/OS
    2. 8.2 Using SCM with IBM MQ
      1. 8.2.1 Why list structures fill up
      2. 8.2.2 SMDS and offload rules
      3. 8.2.3 How SCM works with MQ
    3. 8.3 Use cases for SCM with MQ application structures
      1. 8.3.1 Use case 1: Emergency storage
      2. 8.3.2 Use case 2: Improved performance
    4. 8.4 Using IBM zEDC with IBM MQ
      1. 8.4.1 Introduction to zEDC
      2. 8.4.2 How IBM MQ uses zEDC
      3. 8.4.3 More detail of how the CHINIT address space works
      4. 8.4.4 zEDC settings
    5. 8.5 Summary
  14. Part 3 Scenarios
  15. Chapter 9. Topic host routed publish/subscribe scenarios
    1. 9.1 Environment setup
      1. 9.1.1 Creating and starting the cluster
    2. 9.2 A small publish/subscribe cluster: Direct routing
      1. 9.2.1 Defining the cluster topic
      2. 9.2.2 Testing cluster publication routing
    3. 9.3 A large publish/subscribe cluster: Topic host routing
      1. 9.3.1 Changing the configuration from direct to topic host routing
      2. 9.3.2 Configuring workload balancing
      3. 9.3.3 Testing workload balancing
    4. 9.4 Handling proxy subscription behavior
  16. Chapter 10. Authentication scenarios
    1. 10.1 System preparation and configuration
      1. 10.1.1 AIX
      2. 10.1.2 z/OS configuration
      3. 10.1.3 LDAP configuration
    2. 10.2 Test application
    3. 10.3 AIX queue manager using OS authentication
      1. 10.3.1 No explicit authentication
      2. 10.3.2 Authentication without administrative overrides
      3. 10.3.3 Authentication with a CHLAUTH rule to override
      4. 10.3.4 Authentication using channel exit
    4. 10.4 z/OS queue manager using OS authentication
      1. 10.4.1 No explicit authentication
      2. 10.4.2 Setting a user ID and password
      3. 10.4.3 Failed authentication
    5. 10.5 AIX queue manager using LDAP authentication
      1. 10.5.1 Checking connectivity to the LDAP server
      2. 10.5.2 Application authentication
      3. 10.5.3 Troubleshooting
    6. 10.6 Summary
  17. Chapter 11. CHINIT SMF scenarios
    1. 11.1 System preparation and configuration
      1. 11.1.1 Ensure that SMF is active and writing 115 and 116 records
      2. 11.1.2 Formatting SMF data
    2. 11.2 Scenario 1: Looking at channel throughput
      1. 11.2.1 Objectives of scenario 1
      2. 11.2.2 Test 1: Configuration
      3. 11.2.3 Running and capturing SMF
      4. 11.2.4 Formatting data using MP1B
      5. 11.2.5 Test 1: Analyzing the data
      6. 11.2.6 Test 2: Configuration
      7. 11.2.7 Test 2: Analyzing the data
      8. 11.2.8 Conclusions
      9. 11.2.9 Further analysis that might be required
    3. 11.3 Scenario 2: Varying the number of adapters
      1. 11.3.1 Objectives of scenario
      2. 11.3.2 Set-up and method
      3. 11.3.3 Running the test
      4. 11.3.4 Formatting the SMF data
      5. 11.3.5 Analyzing the data
      6. 11.3.6 Conclusions
  18. Chapter 12. Advantages of a buffer pool above the bar
    1. 12.1 System set-up
    2. 12.2 Test application
    3. 12.3 Test 1: Buffer pool below the bar, nonpersistent messages, no I/O
    4. 12.4 Test 2: Buffer pool above the bar, nonpersistent messages, no I/O
    5. 12.5 Test 3: Buffer pool below the bar, nonpersistent messages, I/O expected
    6. 12.6 Test 4: Buffer pool above the bar, nonpersistent messages
    7. 12.7 Test 5: Buffer pool below the bar, persistent messages
    8. 12.8 Test 6: Buffer pool above the bar, persistent messages
    9. 12.9 Test 7: Buffer pool above the bar, persistent messages, fixed pages
    10. 12.10 Test 8: Buffer pool below the bar, nonpersistent messages, I/O expected
    11. 12.11 Test 9: Buffer pool above the bar, nonpersistent messages, I/O expected
    12. 12.12 Test comparisons
      1. 12.12.1 No I/O for either buffer pool comparison
      2. 12.12.2 Nonpersistent message, below-the-bar I/O comparison
      3. 12.12.3 Persistent message, below-the-bar I/O comparison
      4. 12.12.4 Persistent message using fixed pages comparison
      5. 12.12.5 Nonpersistent message, I/O below- and above-the-bar I/O comparison
    13. 12.13 Summary
  19. Chapter 13. SCM scenarios
    1. 13.1 SCM scenario 1: Emergency storage
      1. 13.1.1 Basic configuration for scenario 1
      2. 13.1.2 Testing the basic configuration with scenario 1
      3. 13.1.3 Adding SMDS to scenario 1
      4. 13.1.4 Testing SMDS with scenario 1
      5. 13.1.5 Adding SCM to scenario 1
      6. 13.1.6 Testing SCM with scenario 1
    2. 13.2 SCM scenario 2: Improved performance
      1. 13.2.1 Basic configuration for scenario 2
      2. 13.2.2 Testing the basic configuration for scenario 2
      3. 13.2.3 Adding SCM to scenario 2
      4. 13.2.4 Testing SCM with scenario 2
    3. 13.3 Summary
  20. Chapter 14. zEDC scenario
    1. 14.1 Setting up the scenario
      1. 14.1.1 TLS configuration
      2. 14.1.2 MQSC commands
      3. 14.1.3 Additional configuration
    2. 14.2 Test methodology
    3. 14.3 Message types
    4. 14.4 Baseline tests
    5. 14.5 Software compression tests
    6. 14.6 Enablement of hardware compression tests
      1. 14.6.1 Verification of zEDC hardware
      2. 14.6.2 Authorizing the channel initiator to use zEDC
    7. 14.7 Hardware compression tests
    8. 14.8 Viewing zEDC RMF reports
    9. 14.9 Results and analysis
      1. 14.9.1 Dispatcher CPU time
      2. 14.9.2 Compression time
      3. 14.9.3 Compression and TLS
      4. 14.9.4 Other observations
    10. 14.10 Summary
  21. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Online resources
    3. Help from IBM
  22. Back cover
  23. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  24. Notices
    1. Trademarks