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IBM HiperSockets Implementation Guide

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication provides information about the IBM System z® HiperSockets™ function. It offers a broad description of the architecture, functions, and operating systems support. This publication will help you plan and implement HiperSockets. It provides information about the definitions needed to configure HiperSockets for the supported operating systems.

This book is intended for system programmers, network planners, and systems engineers who want to plan and install HiperSockets. A solid background in network and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is assumed.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. Overview
    1. 1.1 Overview
    2. 1.2 Server integration with HiperSockets
    3. 1.3 HiperSockets benefits
    4. 1.4 HiperSockets mode of operation
      1. 1.4.1 Unicast operations
      2. 1.4.2 Multicast and broadcast
  5. Chapter 2. HiperSockets environment definitions
    1. 2.1 System configuration considerations
      1. 2.1.1 Channel parameters for HiperSockets
    2. 2.2 HCD definitions
      1. 2.2.1 Dynamic Channel Path Management
      2. 2.2.2 Channel path definitions
      3. 2.2.3 Control unit definitions
      4. 2.2.4 I/O device definitions
      5. 2.2.5 Dynamic reconfiguration
      6. 2.2.6 References
    3. 2.3 IBM z/VM definitions
      1. 2.3.1 Hardware assists
      2. 2.3.2 Implementation example
      3. 2.3.3 IBM z/VM I/O verification
      4. 2.3.4 IBM z/VM definitions for guest systems
  6. Chapter 3. Software configurations for HiperSockets
    1. 3.1 Test configuration
    2. 3.2 HiperSockets in z/OS
      1. 3.2.1 HiperSockets implementation environment
      2. 3.2.2 Implementation steps
      3. 3.2.3 No IBM VTAM setup for HiperSockets
      4. 3.2.4 TCP/IP profile setup for HiperSockets
      5. 3.2.5 Verification of the HiperSockets configuration
    3. 3.3 DYNAMICXCF HiperSockets implementation
      1. 3.3.1 HiperSockets DYNAMICXCF connectivity
      2. 3.3.2 DYNAMICXCF implementation environment
      3. 3.3.3 Implementation steps
      4. 3.3.4 VTAM configuration for DYNAMICXCF
      5. 3.3.5 TCP/IP configuration for DYNAMICXCF
      6. 3.3.6 Verification of the DYNAMICXCF configuration
    4. 3.4 HiperSockets definitions for a z/VM host system
      1. 3.4.1 Permanent TCP/IP definitions for a z/VM host system
      2. 3.4.2 Dynamically define HiperSockets for a z/VM host system
      3. 3.4.3 TCP/IP verification
      4. 3.4.4 References
    5. 3.5 HiperSockets in Linux on System z
      1. 3.5.1 Software requirements
      2. 3.5.2 Linux configuration example
      3. 3.5.3 Linux I/O definitions for the initial installation of the Linux system
      4. 3.5.4 Linux I/O definitions for adding to an existing Linux system
      5. 3.5.5 Permanent Linux definitions
      6. 3.5.6 References
    6. 3.6 HiperSockets in z/VSE
      1. 3.6.1 HiperSockets Support in z/VSE
      2. 3.6.2 Configuring HiperSockets devices in z/VSE
      3. 3.6.3 Configuring a HiperSockets link in TCP/IP
      4. 3.6.4 Related publications
  7. Chapter 4. Performance considerations
    1. 4.1 HiperSockets for highest performance
    2. 4.2 Processor considerations
    3. 4.3 Physical memory structure
    4. 4.4 Maximum transmission unit size
    5. 4.5 Input buffer count
      1. 4.5.1 Input buffer count in IBM z/OS
      2. 4.5.2 Input buffer count in Linux for System z
      3. 4.5.3 Input buffer count in z/VSE
    6. 4.6 References
  8. Chapter 5. Layer 2 and layer 3 modes
    1. 5.1 Concept of layer modes for HiperSockets
    2. 5.2 Layer 3 mode
      1. 5.2.1 IPv4
      2. 5.2.2 IPv6
      3. 5.2.3 IP takeover
    3. 5.3 Layer 2 mode
      1. 5.3.1 MAC address generation
      2. 5.3.2 HiperSockets layer 2 mode software support
  9. Chapter 6. Virtual local area network support
    1. 6.1 Overview
    2. 6.2 Types of connections according to IEEE
      1. 6.2.1 HiperSockets as a virtual switch in trunk mode with VLAN control
    3. 6.3 Out-of-band VLAN management using the IBM zEnterprise Unified Resource Manager Network Virtualization Manager
    4. 6.4 Benefits of HiperSockets VLAN
    5. 6.5 An example of HiperSockets VLAN in z/OS
      1. 6.5.1 Implementation steps
      2. 6.5.2 Virtual Telecommunications Access Method setup for VLAN HiperSockets
      3. 6.5.3 TCP/IP profile customization for VLAN HiperSockets
      4. 6.5.4 Verify VLAN implementation
    6. 6.6 HiperSockets VLAN for a z/VM host system
      1. 6.6.1 VLAN definitions
      2. 6.6.2 VLAN verification
    7. 6.7 HiperSockets VLAN in Linux on System z
      1. 6.7.1 Temporary VLAN for RHEL—VLAN 2 on LNXRH1
      2. 6.7.2 Temporary VLAN for SLES11—VLAN 3 on LNXSU1
      3. 6.7.3 Verifying your setup
      4. 6.7.4 Permanent VLAN definition for Red Hat Enterprise Linux
      5. 6.7.5 Permanent VLAN definition for SLES11
    8. 6.8 HiperSockets VLAN in z/VSE
  10. Chapter 7. More HiperSockets features
    1. 7.1 HiperSockets multiple write facility
      1. 7.1.1 HiperSockets multiwrite for z/OS
    2. 7.2 HiperSockets network traffic analyzer
      1. 7.2.1 Overview
      2. 7.2.2 NTA authorization on the SE
      3. 7.2.3 HiperSockets NTA for Linux on System z
      4. 7.2.4 Reference
    3. 7.3 Completion queue function
      1. 7.3.1 Details about completion queue
      2. 7.3.2 Completion queue for the z/VM HiperSockets Bridge Port
      3. 7.3.3 IUCV Sockets over HiperSockets (Linux, z/VSE)
      4. 7.3.4 Linux Fast Path (Linux, z/VSE)
  11. Chapter 8. Connect HiperSockets to other networks
    1. 8.1 Connecting HiperSockets to external networks
    2. 8.2 HiperSockets Accelerator on z/OS
      1. 8.2.1 The QDIO Accelerator function
      2. 8.2.2 HiperSockets Accelerator implementation
      3. 8.2.3 HiperSockets Accelerator implementation steps
      4. 8.2.4 VTAM configuration
      5. 8.2.5 TCP/IP configuration
      6. 8.2.6 HiperSockets Accelerator verification
      7. 8.2.7 References
    3. 8.3 HiperSockets Network Concentrator on Linux
      1. 8.3.1 Example
      2. 8.3.2 References
    4. 8.4 The z/VM Virtual Switch with HiperSockets bridge port
      1. 8.4.1 The z/VM Virtual Switch
      2. 8.4.2 Bridging a HiperSockets LAN with a z/VM Virtual Switch
      3. 8.4.3 Benefits of a bridged HiperSockets network
      4. 8.4.4 HiperSockets Bridge Port details
      5. 8.4.5 Path MTU Discovery
      6. 8.4.6 References
      7. 8.4.7 Example
  12. Chapter 9. HiperSockets in an IBM zEnterprise ensemble
    1. 9.1 The IBM zEnterprise System
    2. 9.2 The intraensemble data network
    3. 9.3 HiperSockets for IEDN (IQDX)
    4. 9.4 MAC management by the URM
    5. 9.5 VLAN management by the URM
    6. 9.6 Using URM to manage IQDX
      1. 9.6.1 Reserve MAC address ranges
      2. 9.6.2 Define VLANs
      3. 9.6.3 Add virtual servers to a VLAN
      4. 9.6.4 Verify details of a VLAN
    7. 9.7 The z/OS converged interface
      1. 9.7.1 How to define the converged interface
    8. 9.8 IBM z/VM Virtual Switch for IEDN
    9. 9.9 Network monitoring with Unified Resource Manager
  13. Appendix A. Gathering statistics in a HiperSockets environment
    1. The Resource Measurement facility (RMF)
  14. Appendix B. IBM z/OS Sysplex subplexing and HiperSockets
    1. Sysplex subplexing
    2. References
  15. Appendix C. Useful commands
    1. IBM z/OS commands
    2. Editing network profiles in z/OS
    3. Linux on System z commands
    4. IBM z/VM commands
  16. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks
    2. Other publications
    3. Online resources
    4. Help from IBM
  17. Back cover
  18. IBM System x Reference Architecture for Hadoop: IBM InfoSphere BigInsights Reference Architecture
    1. Introduction
    2. Business problem and business value
    3. Reference architecture use
    4. Requirements
    5. InfoSphere BigInsights predefined configuration
    6. InfoSphere BigInsights HBase predefined configuration
    7. Deployment considerations
    8. Customizing the predefined configurations
    9. Predefined configuration bill of materials
    10. References
    11. The team who wrote this paper
    12. Now you can become a published author, too!
    13. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  19. Notices
    1. Trademarks