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IBM and Cisco: Together for a World Class Data Center

Book Description

This IBM® Redbooks® publication is an IBM and Cisco collaboration that articulates how IBM and Cisco can bring the benefits of their respective companies to the modern data center.

It documents the architectures, solutions, and benefits that can be achieved by implementing a data center based on IBM server, storage, and integrated systems, with the broader Cisco network.

We describe how to design a state-of-the art data center and networking infrastructure combining Cisco and IBM solutions. The objective is to provide a reference guide for customers looking to build an infrastructure that is optimized for virtualization, is highly available, is interoperable, and is efficient in terms of power and space consumption. It will explain the technologies used to build the infrastructure, provide use cases, and give guidance on deployments.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. The modern data center
    1. 1.1 Data center drivers and trends
      1. 1.1.1 Key operational challenges
      2. 1.1.2 Attributes of the modern data center
      3. 1.1.3 Impact of virtualization in the modern data center
      4. 1.1.4 The journey towards cloud computing
    2. 1.2 Architecture evolution
      1. 1.2.1 Traditional data center network architecture
      2. 1.2.2 Workload trends affecting data center architecture
      3. 1.2.3 Multiple types of data center
  5. Chapter 2. IBM and Cisco building blocks for the data center
    1. 2.1 IBM systems
    2. 2.2 IBM PureSystems
      1. 2.2.1 IBM PureFlex System
      2. 2.2.2 IBM Flex System Manager
      3. 2.2.3 IBM Flex System nodes
      4. 2.2.4 IBM PureApplication System
      5. 2.2.5 IBM PureData System
      6. 2.2.6 IBM Flex System Networking
      7. 2.2.7 IBM Flex System Fabric EN4093/EN4093R 10 Gb Scalable Switch
      8. 2.2.8 IBM Flex System EN2092 1 Gb Ethernet Scalable Switch
      9. 2.2.9 IBM Flex System EN4091 10 Gb Ethernet Pass-thru Module
      10. 2.2.10 IBM Flex System Fabric CN4093 10 Gb Converged Scalable Switch
      11. 2.2.11 IBM Flex System CN4054 10 Gb Virtual Fabric Adapter
      12. 2.2.12 IBM Flex System EN4132 2-port 10 Gb Ethernet Adapter
      13. 2.2.13 IBM Flex System EN2024 4-port 1 Gb Ethernet Adapter
    3. 2.3 IBM Distributed Virtual Switch 5000V
      1. 2.3.1 Benefits
      2. 2.3.2 Highlights
    4. 2.4 IBM System Networking
      1. 2.4.1 IBM RackSwitch G8264
      2. 2.4.2 IBM System Networking RackSwitch G8264CS
      3. 2.4.3 IBM RackSwitch G8264T
      4. 2.4.4 IBM System Networking RackSwitch G8316
      5. 2.4.5 IBM System Networking RackSwitch G8052
      6. 2.4.6 IBM System Networking RackSwitch G8000
    5. 2.5 IBM Power Systems
      1. 2.5.1 IBM Power models
      2. 2.5.2 Power VM technology
      3. 2.5.3 IBM Systems Management Solutions for Power Servers
    6. 2.6 IBM System z
      1. 2.6.1 IBM zEnterprise 114: A system of systems
      2. 2.6.2 IBM zEnterprise 196
      3. 2.6.3 z/VM
      4. 2.6.4 Linux on System z
      5. 2.6.5 Tivoli Performance Modeler for z/OS
    7. 2.7 IBM iDataPlex
    8. 2.8 IBM System x
      1. 2.8.1 IBM System x3690 X5
    9. 2.9 IBM Smarter Storage
      1. 2.9.1 Efficient by design
    10. 2.10 Disk systems and virtualization
      1. 2.10.1 IBM System Storage SAN Volume Controller
      2. 2.10.2 IBM Storwize V7000 and Storwize V7000 Unified
      3. 2.10.3 XIV
      4. 2.10.4 IBM Scale Out Network Attached Storage
      5. 2.10.5 IBM DS8000 Series
    11. 2.11 Tape systems
      1. 2.11.1 TS1140
      2. 2.11.2 TS3500
      3. 2.11.3 TS3310 Tape Library
      4. 2.11.4 TS7700: Enterprise Virtual Tape Library
    12. 2.12 IBM Real-time Compression
      1. 2.12.1 IBM Real-time Compression Appliance STN6800 and STN6500
    13. 2.13 IBM Tivoli Storage Productivity Center
      1. 2.13.1 Heterogeneous storage environment management
      2. 2.13.2 Simplified management for storage efficiency and reduced costs
      3. 2.13.3 Reporting and analytical capabilities
    14. 2.14 Cisco Local Area Networking Hardware
      1. 2.14.1 Modular switching platforms
      2. 2.14.2 Nexus 7000
    15. 2.15 Fixed form factor switching platforms 
      1. 2.15.1 Nexus 6000
      2. 2.15.2 Nexus 5500
      3. 2.15.3 Nexus 3000
      4. 2.15.4 Nexus 3500
      5. 2.15.5 Nexus 2200
    16. 2.16 IBM BladeCenter Switching platforms
      1. 2.16.1 Nexus 4000 Series switches for IBM BladeCenters
      2. 2.16.2 Catalyst 3110 Series switches for IBM BladeCenters
    17. 2.17 Cisco Storage Area Network and FCoE Hardware
      1. 2.17.1 Cisco MDS 9124
      2. 2.17.2 Cisco MDS 9148
      3. 2.17.3 Cisco MDS 9222i
      4. 2.17.4 Cisco MDS 9250i
      5. 2.17.5 Cisco MDS 9500 Series Multilayer Directors
      6. 2.17.6 Cisco MDS 9710 Series Multilayer Director
    18. 2.18 Power and cooling requirements
      1. 2.18.1 Power and cooling for the Nexus 7000
      2. 2.18.2 Power and cooling for the Nexus 5500
      3. 2.18.3 Power and cooling for the Nexus 3000
      4. 2.18.4 Power and cooling for the Nexus 3500
      5. 2.18.5 Power and cooling for the Nexus 2000
  6. Chapter 3. Designing networks for the modern data center
    1. 3.1 The modular data center network design concept
      1. 3.1.1 The PoD concept
      2. 3.1.2 The Service Zone concept
    2. 3.2 Data center network design considerations
      1. 3.2.1 Data center fabric characteristics and solutions
      2. 3.2.2 IPv6 and the data center
      3. 3.2.3 Multi-tenancy
      4. 3.2.4 Virtualized workload mobility between data centers
      5. 3.2.5 Data center network throughput considerations
      6. 3.2.6 High availability and fast failover
      7. 3.2.7 First Hop Redundancy Protocols
    3. 3.3 Network services: Load balancing, firewall, WAN acceleration, and traffic analysis
      1. 3.3.1 Load balancing
      2. 3.3.2 Firewall
      3. 3.3.3 WAN optimization
      4. 3.3.4 Traffic analysis
    4. 3.4 IP based storage requirements
    5. 3.5 Regulatory compliance
    6. 3.6 Differentiated service levels on a shared infrastructure (QoS)
    7. 3.7 Data center cabling
  7. Chapter 4. Data center physical access layer evolution
    1. 4.1 Introduction to server access layer
    2. 4.2 Traditional server access layer
    3. 4.3 Physical cabling and data center layout
      1. 4.3.1 Modular data center infrastructure
      2. 4.3.2 Server cabling
    4. 4.4 End-of-Row (EoR), Middle-of-Row (MoR), and Top-of-Rack (ToR)
      1. 4.4.1 Why use Top-of-Rack architecture?
    5. 4.5 Fabric Extender (FEX) solutions for the access layer
      1. 4.5.1 FEX solutions
      2. 4.5.2 FEX solutions with Nexus 7000
      3. 4.5.3 FEX solutions with Nexus 5000
      4. 4.5.4 FEX solutions with Nexus 6000
      5. 4.5.5 Layer 2 / Layer 3 design options
      6. 4.5.6 Common access layer design options with the Nexus 5000/6000
      7. 4.5.7 Nexus L3 access layer design options
      8. 4.5.8 Nexus 5000/6000 L3 access deployment models
    6. 4.6 Integrated switching: Blade switches and pass-thru modules
      1. 4.6.1 IBM BladeCenter 10 Gb Ethernet Pass-thru Module
      2. 4.6.2 Intelligent Copper Pass-thru Module (ICPM) for IBM BladeCenter
      3. 4.6.3 IBM BladeCenter Network access layer with Ethernet Switch Modules
      4. 4.6.4 Additional BladeCenter information
    7. 4.7 Flex System: Integrated switches and pass-thru modules
      1. 4.7.1 IBM Flex System EN2092 1 Gb Ethernet Scalable Switch
      2. 4.7.2 IBM Flex System Fabric EN4093 10 Gb Scalable Switch
      3. 4.7.3 IBM Flex System EN4091 10 Gb Ethernet Pass-thru Module
    8. 4.8 IBM System x (physical and virtualized)
      1. 4.8.1 Link aggregation (port trunking)
      2. 4.8.2 xSeries non-virtualized application servers
      3. 4.8.3 xSeries virtual server
    9. 4.9 IBM System p
      1. 4.9.1 pSeries non-virtualized server
      2. 4.9.2 pSeries virtualized server
  8. Chapter 5. Cisco virtual networking solutions
    1. 5.1 The impact of server virtualization to the data center network
      1. 5.1.1 Where is the network edge?
      2. 5.1.2 Challenges to scale server virtualization
    2. 5.2 Cisco virtual networking
    3. 5.3 Nexus 1000v
      1. 5.3.1 Essential Edition and Advanced Edition
      2. 5.3.2 Nexus 1000v architecture
      3. 5.3.3 Components: Virtual Supervisor Module and Virtual Ethernet Module
      4. 5.3.4 VSM-to-VEM communication
      5. 5.3.5 Port profiles: Policy-based virtual machine connectivity
      6. 5.3.6 Nexus 1000v operational model
      7. 5.3.7 Cisco Nexus 1100 Series Virtual Services Appliances
      8. 5.3.8 VSM on Nexus 1100 Series compared to VSM as a virtual machine
      9. 5.3.9 Options to connect the Nexus 1100 to the network
      10. 5.3.10 VXLAN: Virtual eXtensible Local Area Network
      11. 5.3.11 What is a VXLAN?
      12. 5.3.12 Why VXLAN?
      13. 5.3.13 How VXLAN works
      14. 5.3.14 Nexus 1000v support for VXLAN
      15. 5.3.15 Deployment considerations
      16. 5.3.16 Working with OTV and LISP
      17. 5.3.17 Communication outside the VXLAN
    4. 5.4 Cisco Cloud Services Router 1000V Series
  9. Chapter 6. Application networking solutions and data center security, physical and virtual
    1. 6.1 Network technologies that improve application performance and security
    2. 6.2 Cisco Application Control Engine (ACE) and SLB: Considerations and solutions
      1. 6.2.1 Benefits of virtualization with Cisco ACE
    3. 6.3 Application Control Engine (ACE) appliances and modules
      1. 6.3.1 Bridged mode
      2. 6.3.2 Routed mode
      3. 6.3.3 One-armed mode
      4. 6.3.4 Sample deployments
      5. 6.3.5 Data center with Cisco ACE module integrated into the distribution layer
      6. 6.3.6 ACE Global Site Selector appliances
      7. 6.3.7 Application Networking Manager
    4. 6.4 Wide Area Application Services (WAAS)
      1. 6.4.1 Deployment options
    5. 6.5 Cisco APPNAV building blocks
      1. 6.5.1 Intelligent flow distribution
      2. 6.5.2 APPNav design options
      3. 6.5.3 HA considerations
      4. 6.5.4 Cluster sizing
      5. 6.5.5 Flow distribution considerations
      6. 6.5.6 Asymmetric traffic considerations
    6. 6.6 Virtual WAAS
    7. 6.7 ASA series security in the data center
      1. 6.7.1 Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series ASA Services Module
      2. 6.7.2 Cisco ASA 5585-X Adaptive Security Appliance
      3. 6.7.3 Firewall modes of operation
      4. 6.7.4 Security layers in data centers
      5. 6.7.5 Traffic flows
    8. 6.8 Cisco Security Manager (CSM)
      1. 6.8.1 Security policy management
      2. 6.8.2 Cisco security manager primary use cases
    9. 6.9 Cisco TrustSec
      1. 6.9.1 Trustsec in the data center
      2. 6.9.2 Security Group Access
      3. 6.9.3 MACSEC link encryption
    10. 6.10 Virtualized Network Services
      1. 6.10.1 Virtual Services Appliances
      2. 6.10.2 Virtual network service data path (vPath)
      3. 6.10.3 Cisco Virtual Security Gateway
      4. 6.10.4 ASA 1000V Cloud Firewall
      5. 6.10.5 Virtual NAM: Network Analysis Module
  10. Chapter 7. Convergence of LAN and SAN: Fibre Channel over Ethernet
    1. 7.1 Converged networking in data centers
    2. 7.2 Business benefits and customer drivers for Unified Fabric
      1. 7.2.1 Real-world comparison
      2. 7.2.2 End-to-End Unified Fabric TCO Calculator
    3. 7.3 But what is FCoE all about, is it SAN or LAN?
      1. 7.3.1 FCoE high level overview
    4. 7.4 Fibre Channel over Ethernet architecture
      1. 7.4.1 Key terminology
      2. 7.4.2 Fibre Channel
      3. 7.4.3 Data Center Bridging (DCB)
      4. 7.4.4 Enhanced Transmission Selection (ETS)
      5. 7.4.5 Priority Flow Control (PFC)
      6. 7.4.6 Quantized Congestion Notification (CN or QCN)
      7. 7.4.7 Fibre Channel forwarder
      8. 7.4.8 FCoE Initialization Protocol
      9. 7.4.9 FIP VLAN discovery
      10. 7.4.10 FIP FCF discovery
      11. 7.4.11 FIP FLOGI and FDISC
      12. 7.4.12 FIP snooping
    5. 7.5 Multi-hop Fibre Channel over Ethernet
    6. 7.6 iSCSI technology
    7. 7.7 Cisco and IBM solutions for FCoE
      1. 7.7.1 Cisco FCoE portfolio
      2. 7.7.2 Topologies for connecting IBM servers to Cisco FCoE switches
      3. 7.7.3 Topology 1: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 5x00 and FC uplink to the SAN
      4. 7.7.4 Topology 2: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 5x00/6000 and FCoE uplink to the SAN
      5. 7.7.5 Topology 3: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 7000 and FCoE uplink to the SAN
      6. 7.7.6 Topology 4: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 5x00 + single-attached Nexus 2232PP/2248PQ and FC uplink to the SAN
      7. 7.7.7 Topology 5: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 5x00/6000 + single-attached Nexus 2232PP/2248PQ and FCoE uplink to the SAN
      8. 7.7.8 Topology 6: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 5x00 + dual-homed Nexus 2232PP/2248PQ and FC uplink to the SAN
      9. 7.7.9 Topology 7: FCoE at the access layer with Nexus 5x00/6000 + dual-homed Nexus 2232PP/2248PQ and FCoE uplink to the SAN
      10. 7.7.10 Topology 8: FCoE for the IBM BladeCenter with Nexus 4000 + Nexus 5x00 and FC uplink to the SAN
      11. 7.7.11 Topology 9: FCoE for the IBM BladeCenter with Nexus 4000 + Nexus 5x00/6000 and FCoE uplink to the SAN
      12. 7.7.12 Topology 10: FCoE for the IBM BladeCenter with Nexus 4000 + Nexus 7000 and FCoE uplink to the SAN
      13. 7.7.13 Topology 11: FCoE beyond the access layer with multi-hop FCoE
      14. 7.7.14 FCoE maximum supported distances
      15. 7.7.15 Converged Network Adapters
      16. 7.7.16 Emulex 10GbE Virtual Fabric Adapter and Emulex 10GbE Virtual Fabric Adapter II for IBM BladeCenter
      17. 7.7.17 QLogic 2-port 10Gb Converged Network Adapter (CFFh) for IBM BladeCenter
      18. 7.7.18 Brocade 2-port 10GbE Converged Network Adapter for IBM BladeCenter
      19. 7.7.19 Cisco FCoE networking products
    8. 7.8 Operational models enabling FCoE
      1. 7.8.1 Role Based Access Control
      2. 7.8.2 Nexus 7000 Storage Virtual Device Context
      3. 7.8.3 Licensing requirements for FCoE
    9. 7.9 Acronyms
  11. Chapter 8. Overcoming the limitations of traditional data center networks
    1. 8.1 Traditional data center network model and its limitations
      1. 8.1.1 Traditional three tiered data center network model
      2. 8.1.2 Shortcomings of the tiered data center network
    2. 8.2 Multi-chassis EtherChannel techniques
      1. 8.2.1 Port channeling
      2. 8.2.2 Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP)
      3. 8.2.3 Port channel benefits
      4. 8.2.4 Solving regular port channel limitations
      5. 8.2.5 vPC: Virtual Port Channel
      6. 8.2.6 vPC components and terminology
      7. 8.2.7 vPC data plane loop avoidance
      8. 8.2.8 Enhanced vPC
      9. 8.2.9 Other vPC enhancements
    3. 8.3 Data center network fabrics
      1. 8.3.1 FabricPath
      2. 8.3.2 FabricPath use cases
      3. 8.3.3 FabricPath design considerations
      4. 8.3.4 vPC+
      5. 8.3.5 IETF TRILL and FabricPath
    4. 8.4 Data Center Network overlays
      1. 8.4.1 Overlay Transport Virtualization
      2. 8.4.2 OTV MAC address advertisement
      3. 8.4.3 OTV failure isolation
      4. 8.4.4 VPLS
      5. 8.4.5 LISP
      6. 8.4.6 LISP components and terminology
      7. 8.4.7 LISP functionality
      8. 8.4.8 LISP use case: Server mobility
    5. 8.5 Summary
  12. Chapter 9. NX-OS network operating system
    1. 9.1 NX-OS building blocks
      1. 9.1.1 Modular code base
      2. 9.1.2 Intelligent fault detection and recovery
      3. 9.1.3 Continuous operation and high availability
      4. 9.1.4 Enhanced usability and familiar operation
    2. 9.2 Virtual device contexts overview
    3. 9.3 Security
    4. 9.4 IPv6 support
    5. 9.5 Advanced system management
    6. 9.6 In-service software upgrade
    7. 9.7 Control plane and data plane separation
      1. 9.7.1 Control Plane Policing (CoPP)
    8. 9.8 Graceful Restart and Non Stop Routing
    9. 9.9 NX-OS fast failover features
      1. 9.9.1 Fast Failure Detection
      2. 9.9.2 Fast Failure Reaction
      3. 9.9.3 Bidirectional Forwarding Detection
  13. Chapter 10. Data center network management and automation
    1. 10.1 Data center network management requirements
      1. 10.1.1 Topology discovery
      2. 10.1.2 Syslog
      3. 10.1.3 Event management
      4. 10.1.4 Role Based Access Control (RBAC)
      5. 10.1.5 Network configuration management
      6. 10.1.6 Network change management
      7. 10.1.7 Network performance management
      8. 10.1.8 Provisioning
    2. 10.2 Cisco Prime Data Center Network Manager LAN and SAN
      1. 10.2.1 Features and benefits of Cisco Prime DCNM
      2. 10.2.2 DCNM automated discovery
      3. 10.2.3 DCNM Web dashboards
      4. 10.2.4 DCNM Web Topology View
      5. 10.2.5 DCNM event management
      6. 10.2.6 DCNM web templates
      7. 10.2.7 DCNM performance and capacity management
      8. 10.2.8 DCNM capacity manager
      9. 10.2.9 DCNM configuration and change management
      10. 10.2.10 DCNM: VMpath analysis for LAN and SAN
      11. 10.2.11 DCNM reports
      12. 10.2.12 DCNM image management
    3. 10.3 Cisco Virtual Network Management Center
      1. 10.3.1 Improving security and enhance collaboration
      2. 10.3.2 Security administrator
    4. 10.4 Cisco Access Control System (ACS)
    5. 10.5 Cisco Prime Infrastructure
    6. 10.6 Cisco Network Services Manager
      1. 10.6.1 Deploying flexible, policy-directed management
    7. 10.7 Cisco Security Manager (CSM)
      1. 10.7.1 Policy and object management
      2. 10.7.2 Event management
      3. 10.7.3 Reporting and troubleshooting
    8. 10.8 Cisco Prime Network Registrar (CNR)
    9. 10.9 Network capabilities enabling application performance management
      1. 10.9.1 Netflow
      2. 10.9.2 Switch Port Analyzer (SPAN)
      3. 10.9.3 Algo Boost
      4. 10.9.4 PoAP
      5. 10.9.5 Network Timing Protocol (NTP)
      6. 10.9.6 Cisco Embedded Event Manager
      7. 10.9.7 Device performance and capacity
    10. 10.10 IBM Tivoli solutions
      1. 10.10.1 IBM Tivoli Netcool Network Management
      2. 10.10.2 IBM Tivoli Netcool Configuration Manager
      3. 10.10.3 IBM Tivoli Network Performance Flow Analyzer
      4. 10.10.4 IBM Tivoli OMNIbus
      5. 10.10.5 IBM Tivoli NetView for z/OS
      6. 10.10.6 IBM Security Network Intrusion Prevention System
      7. 10.10.7 IBM QRadar Network Anomaly Detection
    11. 10.11 Integration between Cisco and IBM solutions
      1. 10.11.1 Security
      2. 10.11.2 Storage
      3. 10.11.3 Networking
    12. 10.12 Comprehensive data center management
      1. 10.12.1 Fragmented data availability
      2. 10.12.2 Defining your efficiency metrics
      3. 10.12.3 Assigning efficiency architects
      4. 10.12.4 Expanding the scope of capacity management
      5. 10.12.5 Integrating across IT and facilities for the bigger picture
      6. 10.12.6 Optimizing based on analytics
      7. 10.12.7 Using knowledge for future planning
      8. 10.12.8 Effective integration into daily business
    13. 10.13 Data center automation
      1. 10.13.1 Cisco Network Services Manager
      2. 10.13.2 Automated reporting
  14. Chapter 11. Software Defined Networking and Cisco Open Network Environment
    1. 11.1 Software Defined Networking overview
      1. 11.1.1 SDN objectives and definition
      2. 11.1.2 Areas of collaboration between IBM and Cisco
    2. 11.2 Cisco Open Network Environment
      1. 11.2.1 Programmatic Interfaces: Cisco One Platform Kit (onePK)
      2. 11.2.2 Controllers and Agents
      3. 11.2.3 Virtual network overlays
  15. Chapter 12. IBM and Cisco next generation architectures for Small, Medium, and Large Data Centers
    1. 12.1 IBM and Cisco Data Center objectives
    2. 12.2 IBM and Cisco Data Center component model
      1. 12.2.1 Data Center Edge
      2. 12.2.2 External Security Services
      3. 12.2.3 Network Services
      4. 12.2.4 Internal Security Services
      5. 12.2.5 Data Center LAN
      6. 12.2.6 Data Center SAN
      7. 12.2.7 Data Center Servers
      8. 12.2.8 Data Center Storage
      9. 12.2.9 Data Center Management and Support
    3. 12.3 Data center requirements
      1. 12.3.1 Technical requirements
      2. 12.3.2 Non-functional requirements
      3. 12.3.3 Operational requirements
    4. 12.4 Data center use cases
    5. 12.5 Small Data Center use case
      1. 12.5.1 Definition/introduction
      2. 12.5.2 Assumptions
      3. 12.5.3 Design concept
      4. 12.5.4 PoD design
      5. 12.5.5 Service Zone design
      6. 12.5.6 Storage and storage network design
    6. 12.6 Medium data center use case
      1. 12.6.1 Definition/introduction
      2. 12.6.2 Assumptions
      3. 12.6.3 Design concept
      4. 12.6.4 Service Zone design
      5. 12.6.5 FCOE design of the Medium Data Center
      6. 12.6.6 FabricPath design for the Medium Data Center
      7. 12.6.7 FabricPath and FCoE for the Medium Data Center
      8. 12.6.8 Design decisions for the Medium Data Center
      9. 12.6.9 PoD design
      10. 12.6.10 Interconnecting the new and legacy data centers
      11. 12.6.11 Extending data center VLANs using OTV
      12. 12.6.12 Logical view of Nexus 7000 VDCs
      13. 12.6.13 Storage and storage network design for Medium Data Center use case
    7. 12.7 Large data center use case
      1. 12.7.1 Definition/introduction
      2. 12.7.2 Assumptions
      3. 12.7.3 Design concept
      4. 12.7.4 PoD design
      5. 12.7.5 Service Zone design
      6. 12.7.6 Network scale and design considerations
      7. 12.7.7 Storage and Storage Area Network design
    8. 12.8 WAN Edge Block Design for Small, Medium, and Large Data Centers
    9. 12.9 DMZ design
      1. 12.9.1 Public-facing services
      2. 12.9.2 Corporate Internet access
      3. 12.9.3 Remote access
      4. 12.9.4 Internet VPN
    10. 12.10 Services supporting next generation data center architectures
      1. 12.10.1 IBM Global Technology Services for modern data centers
      2. 12.10.2 Cisco Data Center Networking Services
  16. Related publications
    1. IBM Redbooks publications
    2. Other publications
    3. Help from IBM
  17. Back cover