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Hydroxyapatite

Book Description

Evidence-based literature reviews can provide foundation skills in research-oriented bibliographic inquiry, with an emphasis on such review and synthesis of applicable literature. Information is gathered by surveying a broad array of multidisciplinary research publications written by scholars and researchers. This book is based on a review of about 2,000 carefully selected articles about hydroxyapatite (HA) materials from about 150 peer-review journals in both engineering and medical areas and presents itself as a typical example of evidence-based learning (EBL). HA is very unique material which has been employed equally in both engineering and medical and dental fields. In addition, the name “apatite” comes from the Greek word απατw, which means to deceive. What is actually happening inside the apatite crystal structure is based on the unique characteristics of ion exchangeability. Because of this, versatility of HA has been recognized in wide ranges, including bone-grafting substitutes, various ways to fabricate HAs, HA-based coating materials, HA-based biocomposites, scaffold materials, and drug-delivery systems. This book covers all these interesting areas involved in HA materials science and technology.

Table of Contents

  1. Frontcover
  2. Half Title
  3. Title
  4. Copyright
  5. Contents
  6. List of Figures
  7. List of Tables
  8. Acknowledgments
  9. Preface
  10. 1 Introduction
    1. References
  11. 2 Structure and Properties
    1. 2.1 Introduction
    2. 2.2 High-temperature and Low-temperature HAs
    3. 2.3 Dissolution and Solubility
    4. 2.4 Compositional Alteration of HA
    5. 2.5 Crystallinity and Its Effects
    6. 2.6 Ca–P Family Members
    7. 2.7 Comparison between HA and TCP
    8. 2.8 HA/TCP Biphasic Biocomposites
    9. References
  12. 3 Preparation of Hydroxyapatite
    1. 3.1 Introduction
    2. 3.2 Sources for Calcium in HA
    3. 3.3 HA Synthesis Technologies
    4. References
  13. 4 Elemental Substitutions in Hydroxyapatite Structure
    1. 4.1 Introduction
    2. 4.2 M Substitution in M10(XO4)6(Y)2
    3. 4.3 XO4 Substitution in M10(XO4)6(Y)2
    4. 4.4 Y Substitution in M10(XO4)6(Y)2
    5. 4.5 Antibiotics
    6. References
  14. 5 Hydroxyapatite Coating Materials
    1. 5.1 Introduction
    2. 5.2 Coating Materials
    3. 5.3 Coating Methods
    4. 5.4 Characterizations of Coated HA
    5. 5.5 Results on Animal Studies
    6. 5.6 Clinical Reports
    7. References
  15. 6 Bone-Graft Substitute Materials
    1. 6.1 Introduction
    2. 6.2 Classification
    3. 6.3 Calcium-Deficient HA
    4. 6.4 HA Bone-Graft Substitutes
    5. References
  16. 7 Hydroxyapatite-Based Biocomposites
    1. 7.1 Introduction
    2. 7.2 HA–Metal and Alloys
    3. 7.3 HA–Metallic Oxides
    4. 7.4 HA–Minerals
    5. 7.5 HA–Carbon, Carbides, and Nitrides
    6. 7.6 HA–Glass and Bioglass
    7. 7.7 HA–Dental Composites
    8. 7.8 HA–Polymers
    9. 7.9 HA–Protein and Collagen
    10. 7.10 HA–HA Whiskers and TCP
    11. 7.11 Functionally Graded HA Structure
    12. References
  17. 8 Biomimetic Materials and Structures
    1. 8.1 Introduction
    2. 8.2 Treatments in Simulated Body Fluid
    3. 8.3 Treatments with Protein Groups
    4. 8.4 Treatments with Chitosan
    5. 8.5 Treatments with Other Composites
    6. 8.6 Mechanical Properties
    7. References
  18. 9 Scaffolds and Drug-Delivery Systems
    1. 9.1 Introduction
    2. 9.2 Scaffold—Structure and Materials
    3. 9.3 Drug-Delivery Systems
    4. References
  19. 10 Effects of Hydroxyapatite and Influences on Hydroxyapatite
    1. 10.1 Introduction
    2. 10.2 Effects of HA
    3. 10.3 Various Parameters Affecting HA
    4. References
  20. About the Author
  21. Index
  22. Ad Page
  23. Backcover