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HTTP: The Definitive Guide

Cover of HTTP: The Definitive Guide by David Gourley... Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
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Status Codes

Table B-2 is a quick reference for all the status codes defined in the HTTP/1.1 specification, providing a brief summary of each.Section 3.4goes into more detailed descriptions of these status codes and their uses.

Table B-2. Status codes

Status code

Reason phrase

Meaning

100

Continue

An initial part of the request was received, and the client should continue.

101

Switching Protocols

The server is changing protocols, as specified by the client, to one listed in the Upgrade header.

200

OK

The request is okay.

201

Created

The resource was created (for requests that create server objects).

202

Accepted

The request was accepted, but the server has not yet performed any action with it.

203

Non-Authoritative Information

The transaction was okay, except the information contained in the entity headers was not from the origin server, but from a copy of the resource.

204

No Content

The response message contains headers and a status line, but no entity body.

205

Reset Content

Another code primarily for browsers; basically means that the browser should clear any HTML form elements on the current page.

206

Partial Content

A partial request was successful.

300

Multiple Choices

A client has requested a URL that actually refers to multiple resources. This code is returned along with a list of options; the user can then select which one he wants.

301

Moved Permanently

The requested URL has been moved. The response should contain a Location ...

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