You are previewing HTML5 and JavaScript Web Apps.

HTML5 and JavaScript Web Apps

Cover of HTML5 and JavaScript Web Apps by Wesley Hales Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. HTML5 and JavaScript Web Apps
  2. Preface
    1. Who This Book Is For
    2. Who This Book Is Not For
    3. What You’ll Learn
    4. About the Code
    5. Conventions Used in This Book
    6. Using Code Examples
    7. Safari® Books Online
    8. How to Contact Us
    9. Acknowledgments
  3. 1. Client-Side Architecture
    1. Before HTML5
    2. More Code on the Client
    3. The Browser as a Platform
    4. Conclusion
  4. 2. The Mobile Web
    1. Mobile First
    2. Deciding What to Support
      1. Mobile Web Browsers
    3. Mobile Browser Market Share
    4. Browser Grading
    5. HTML5 in the Enterprise
      1. Graceful Degradation
    6. QA and Device Testing
  5. 3. Building for the Mobile Web
    1. Mobile Web Look and Feel
      1. The Look
      2. The Feel
    2. Interactions and Transitions
      1. Sliding
      2. Flipping
      3. Rotating
      4. Debugging Hardware Acceleration
      5. Memory Consumption
    3. Fetching and Caching
    4. Network Type Detection and Handling
    5. Frameworks and Approaches
      1. Single Page
      2. No Page Structure
      3. 100% JavaScript Driven
      4. Mobile Debugging
  6. 4. The Desktop Web
    1. The Browser as a Platform
      1. Client Versus Server HTML Generation
    2. Device and Feature Detection
      1. Client-Side Feature Detection
      2. Client-Side userAgent Detection
      3. Server-Side userAgent Detection
    3. Compression
      1. GZIP Versus DEFLATE
      2. Minification
    4. JavaScript MVC Frameworks and the Server
      1. The Top Five Frameworks
      2. Backbone
      3. Ember
      4. Angular
      5. Batman
      6. Knockout
  7. 5. WebSockets
    1. Building the Stack
      1. On the Server, Behind the Scenes
    2. Programming Models
      1. Relaying Events from the Server to the Browser
      2. Binary Data Over WebSockets
      3. Managing Proxies
      4. Frameworks
  8. 6. Optimizing with Web Storage
    1. The Storage API
    2. The StorageEvent API
      1. What’s Racy and What’s Not?
    3. Using JSON to Encode and Decode
    4. Security and Private Browsing
      1. Security
      2. Private Browsing
    5. Who’s Using Web Storage?
      1. Using Web Storage Today
    6. Syncing Data from the Client Side
      1. Database Syncing with Backbone
    7. Using Web Storage in Any Browser
    8. Frameworks
      1. LawnChair
      2. persistence.js
  9. 7. Geolocation
    1. A Practical Use Case: User Tracking
    2. A Practical Use Case: Reverse Geocoding
    3. Frameworks
      1. geo-location-javascript
      2. Webshims lib
  10. 8. Device Orientation API
    1. A Practical Use Case: Scrolling with Device Movement
  11. 9. Web Workers
    1. A Practical Use Case: Pooling and Parallelizing Jobs
      1. Other Uses
  12. Index
  13. About the Author
  14. Colophon
  15. Copyright

Chapter 2. The Mobile Web

Consumers are on track to buy one billion HTML5-capable mobile devices in 2013. Today, half of US adults own smartphones. This comprises 150 million people, and 28% of those consider mobile their primary way of accessing the Web. The ground swell of support for HTML5 applications over native ones is here, and today’s developers are flipping their priorities to put mobile development first.

Even in large enterprise environments, mobile browser statistics are on the rise and starting to align with their desktop cousins. We are still faced, however, with the fact that one third of the Internet is using a version of Internet Explorer older than 9. Even more sobering, in some cases, these early IE users can make up two thirds of the visitors to our sites. This will get better over time, and desktop users will upgrade to newer versions and better browsers, but as we push the Web forward and create amazing applications across all browsers, we must also create a solid architecture that will account for all users and give them the best experience possible.

The capabilities of web browsers mean everything to the success of our web projects and products. Whether for fun, profit, or the overall betterment of mankind, it’s important to understand how data should be served up for both desktop and mobile users. Finding the common ground across all browsers and figuring out which pieces should be used in the construction of today’s web applications is the goal of this ...

The best content for your career. Discover unlimited learning on demand for around $1/day.