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HP OpenView System Administration Handbook: Network Node Manager, Customer Views, Service Information Portal, HP OpenView Operations

Book Description

OpenView System Administration Handbook: Network Node Manager, Customer Views, Service Information Portal, OpenView Operations

Tammy Zitello

Deborah Williams

Paul Weber

Use OpenView tools to improve network performance, availability, and value

Planning, installation, customization, security, optimization, scalability, troubleshooting, and more

"I would recommend this book to my students." --Emil Velez, Technical Consultant - Education, HP

The comprehensive, authoritative guide to OpenView administration

This is the first comprehensive, hands-on guide to using OpenView administration tools to maximize network performance, availability, and value. You'll find expert guidance on planning, customization, automation, security, optimization, troubleshooting, and a whole lot more.

After a practical review of network management and SNMP, three HP consultants walk you through using Network Node Manager (NNM) to monitor network connectivity -- and adapting NNM to your unique requirements. Next, you'll discover how to use Customer Views (CV) containers to manage your most important resources, from customers to Internet sites. The authors offer realistic guidance on managing networks across the Web using HP's Service Information Portal, and on monitoring computers and software with OpenView Operations (OVO). Coverage includes:

  • Overcoming obstacles to successful network and system management

  • Planning for deployment: a best-practices checklist

  • Running NNM: discovery, symbols, objects, alarms, and queries

  • Customizing NNM: submaps, application integration, custom symbols/fields, and more

  • CV: providing a logical view of devices based on customer ownership

  • SIP: making management information Web-accessible, step-by-step

  • Managing data collection and event configuration

  • Scalability and distribution: remote consoles, filters, and Distributed Internet Monitoring

  • Roles, service levels, installation, configuration, agents, policies, and day-to-day administration

  • Taking full advantage of Smart Plug-Ins (SPI)

  • Improving flexibility by adding Multiple Management Servers

  • Includes OpenView Command Quick Reference Guide

  • If you're a network/system administrator running OpenView under HP-UX, Unix, or Windows, OpenView System Administration Handbook will make you more productive, more effective, and more valuable.

    COMPANION WEB SITE

    Contains scripts and files to simplify and automate OpenView administration

    PRENTICE HALL
    Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
    http://www.phptr.com

    ISBN: 0-13-035209-8

    © Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

    Table of Contents

    1. Copyright
      1. Dedications
    2. Praise for HP OpenView System Administration Handbook
    3. Hewlett-Packard® Professional Books
    4. How This Book Is Organized
    5. Acknowledgements
    6. Who This Book Is For
    7. Conventions Used in This Book
    8. 1. Network Node Manager, Customer Views, and Service Information Portal
      1. 1. Introduction to Network Node Manager, Customer Views, and Service Information Portal
        1. 1.1. AN SNMP COKE MACHINE
          1. 1.1.1. A Review of SNMP
        2. 1.2. WHAT NETWORK NODE MANAGER PROVIDES
          1. 1.2.1. Continuous Status Monitoring of Managed Nodes
          2. 1.2.2. User and Administrator Interfaces
          3. 1.2.3. Integration with Trouble Ticketing Systems
          4. 1.2.4. Third-Party Applications
          5. 1.2.5. The Need for Network Management
        3. 1.3. WHAT CUSTOMER VIEWS PROVIDES
        4. 1.4. WHAT SERVICE INFORMATION PORTAL PROVIDES
        5. 1.5. OBTAINING EVALUATION COPIES OF NNM, CV, AND SIP
        6. 1.6. ADDITIONAL OPENVIEW PRODUCTS
          1. 1.6.1. HP OpenView Operations (OVO)
          2. 1.6.2. HP OpenView Performance (OVP)
        7. 1.7. SOME HELPFUL URLS
      2. 2. Why Network and Systems Management Systems Fail
        1. 2.1. …TO WORK PROPERLY
          1. 2.1.1. Incorrect Configuration of Hostname Resolution
        2. 2.2. …TO EFFECTIVELY MANAGE THE ENTERPRISE GROWTH
          1. 2.2.1. Lack of Hardware and Software Resources
          2. 2.2.2. Lack of Human Resources
          3. 2.2.3. Inadequate Training
        3. 2.3. …TO MANAGE EVERYTHING AT ONCE
        4. 2.4. …TO EVEN GET OFF THE GROUND
          1. 2.4.1. Layers 8 and 9 of the OSI Model
          2. 2.4.2. Other Groups Won't Cooperate
        5. 2.5. SUMMARY
      3. 3. Create a Deployment Plan
        1. 3.1. MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS
          1. 3.1.1. Problem Detection
          2. 3.1.2. Software Requirements
            1. 3.1.2.1. Network Node Manager
            2. 3.1.2.2. OpenView Operations
            3. 3.1.2.3. Additional Management Products
            4. 3.1.2.4. Functionality Overlap
        2. 3.2. DEFINE THE MANAGEMENT DOMAIN
          1. 3.2.1. What Will Be Managed?
            1. Nodes and Networks
            2. IPX Nodes
            3. DHCP Hosts
            4. Level-2 Discovery
            5. OVO Managed Nodes
          2. 3.2.2. Collection Station Requirements
            1. 3.2.2.1. Collection Domains
              1. 3.2.2.1.1. Will there be any Overlapping Domains?
              2. 3.2.2.1.2. Will there be any Collection Station Fail-over?
            2. 3.2.2.2. Distributed Internet Discovery and Monitoring (DIDM)
          3. 3.2.3. Distributed Consoles, Web Presenter, or the Java GUI?
            1. 3.2.3.1. Distributed Consoles
            2. 3.2.3.2. OpenView Web Interface
            3. 3.2.3.3. Java GUI
          4. 3.2.4. Data Warehouse and Data Collection
            1. 3.2.4.1. Questions to Consider when Planning for the Data Warehouse
        3. 3.3. ARE THERE FIREWALLS WITHIN THE MANAGEMENT DOMAIN?
        4. 3.4. OUT-OF-BAND NETWORK MANAGEMENT
        5. 3.5. BACKUP AND RECOVERY REQUIREMENTS
        6. 3.6. AUTHENTICATION, AUTHORIZATION, AND ACCESS CONTROL REQUIREMENTS
        7. 3.7. EVENT CORRELATION REQUIREMENTS
        8. 3.8. HIGH AVAILABILITY AND FAULT TOLERANCE REQUIREMENTS
        9. 3.9. CONFIGURATION AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT PROCESS REQUIREMENTS
        10. 3.10. HARDWARE CONFIGURATION REQUIREMENTS
          1. 3.10.1. Memory Requirements
          2. 3.10.2. Disk Space and Disk I/O Requirements
          3. 3.10.3. One Database Vendor
          4. 3.10.4. Memory Amount and Kernel Parameter Requirements
        11. 3.11. SUMMARY
      4. 4. Out-of-the-box Network Node Manager
        1. 4.1. NNM DISCOVERY
          1. 4.1.1. ovw: Maps and Submaps
          2. 4.1.2. The Menu Bar
          3. 4.1.3. The Toolbar Icons
          4. 4.1.4. Pan and Zoom
          5. 4.1.5. Map Navigation
            1. 4.1.5.1. Non-SNMP Devices
        2. 4.2. SYMBOLS AND OBJECTS
          1. 4.2.1. View and Locate Object Attributes
          2. 4.2.2. Symbol Status Colors
          3. 4.2.3. Status Propagation Rules
        3. 4.3. ALARM CATEGORIES
          1. 4.3.1. All Alarms Browser
        4. 4.4. QUERYING THE MIB
          1. 4.4.1. The MIB-II Subtree
          2. 4.4.2. Graphing MIB Variables
          3. 4.4.3. Loading Additional MIBs into NNM
            1. 4.4.3.1. The Need for Vendor-Specific MIBs
            2. 4.4.3.2. Vendor-specific Trap Definitions
        5. 4.5. WEB ACCESS
          1. 4.5.1. The OpenView Launcher
          2. 4.5.2. The Network Presenter
          3. 4.5.3. Dynamic Views
        6. 4.6. SUMMARY
      5. 5. Network Discovery
        1. 5.1. SEEDING INITIAL DISCOVERY
          1. 5.1.1. Setting NNM Environment Variables
          2. 5.1.1. netmon: the Discovery Process
          3. 5.1.2. Excluding Devices from Discovery
          4. 5.1.3. Testing SNMP Connectivity
          5. 5.1.4. Re-discovering the Network
            1. 5.1.4.1. The Background Processes
          6. 5.1.5. The netmon.lrf File
        2. 5.2. ADDITIONAL DISCOVERY METHODS
          1. 5.2.1. Discovery using loadhosts
          2. 5.2.2. Discovery via the NNM GUI
        3. 5.3. NETMON POLLING STATISTICS
        4. 5.4. CONFIGURING SNMP COMMUNITY NAMES
          1. 5.4.1. SNMP Manager Configuration
          2. 5.4.2. SNMP Agent Configuration
        5. 5.5. FIREWALL CONSIDERATIONS IN NETWORK DISCOVERY
        6. 5.6. SUMMARY
      6. 6. Customizing NNM from the GUI
        1. 6.1. CUSTOMIZING SUBMAPS
          1. 6.1.1. Setting the Default Map and Home Submap
          2. 6.1.2. Submap Overlay, Window Geometry, and Symbol Hiding
          3. 6.1.3. Setting Background Graphics and Automatic Layout
            1. 6.1.3.1. Memory Considerations when using Background Graphics
            2. 6.1.3.2. Submap Persistence
            3. 6.1.3.3. Automatic Layout
          4. 6.1.4. Partitioning the Internet Submap
          5. 6.1.5. Creating Executable Symbols
          6. 6.1.6. MIB Applications
            1. 6.1.5.1. Built-in MIB Applications
            2. 6.1.5.2. Creating MIB Applications
            3. 6.1.5.3. Use Your MIB Application as an Executable Symbol
        2. 6.2. SUMMARY
      7. 7. Advanced Customization
        1. 7.1. Application Integration using Application Registration Files (ARFs)
          1. 7.1.1. Creating Your Own ARF
          2. 7.1.2. Zman's Sample ARF
          3. 7.1.3. Zman's Extra Cool Object Info ARF
            1. 7.1.3.1. The Code For Zman's XCOI ARF
            2. 7.1.3.2. The showzmansxcoi Script
          4. 7.1.4. Limiting Menu Items by Setting the Submap Context
          5. 7.1.5. Limiting Application Execution with the Selection Rule
          6. 7.1.6. Output of ovobjprint
          7. 7.1.7. Use Your ARF as an Executable Symbol
          8. 7.1.8. The ovw Application Registration File
          9. 7.1.9. Limiting Access to Applications using OVwRegDir
        2. 7.2. Application Integration using Web Launcher Registration Files (WLRF) and Network Presenter Registration Files (NPRF)
          1. 7.2.1. Creating Your Own WLRF
            1. 7.2.1.1. Configuring Event Correlation
            2. Network Connector Down
            3. Correlation Composer
            4. Pair Wise
            5. Repeated Events
            6. Scheduled Maintenance
          2. 7.2.2. Zman's Sample WLRF
          3. 7.2.3. Creating Your Own NPRF
          4. 7.2.4. Zman's Sample NPRF
        3. 7.3. Defining Custom Symbols and Fields
          1. 7.3.1. Description of the SRF
            1. 7.3.1.1. The Computer Symbol Class File
            2. 7.3.1.2. The HP-UX Symbol Subclass File
          2. 7.3.2. Creating Your Own SRF
            1. 7.3.2.1. The Toaster Subclass File
          3. 7.3.3. Description of the FRF
            1. 7.3.3.1. Creating Your Own Field Registration File
          4. 7.3.4. Limiting Access to Custom Symbols and Fields
        4. 7.4. Summary
      8. 8. Data Collection and Event Configuration
        1. 8.1. CREATING A DATA COLLECTION
          1. 8.1.1. Defining and Displaying an MIB Collection
          2. 8.1.2. Defining an MIB Expression for Collection
        2. 8.2. CREATING THRESHOLD AND REARM EVENTS
          1. 8.2.1. Defining a Threshold Event for Data Collection
          2. 8.2.2. Defining a Rearm Event for Data Collection
          3. 8.2.3. Generating Actions Based on Custom Thresholds
            1. 8.2.3.1. Automatic Actions for UNIX systems
            2. 8.2.3.2. Automatic Actions for Windows Systems
          4. 8.2.4. Creating Custom Alarm Categories
          5. 8.2.5. Accessing Events from the Alarm Browser
        3. 8.3. CUSTOMIZING EXISTING DATA COLLECTIONS
        4. 8.4. CUSTOMIZING EXISTING EVENTS
        5. 8.5. TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF DATA COLLECTION AND EVENTS
        6. 8.6. DETAILED SOLUTION TO NETWORK PRINTER EXERCISE
        7. 8.7. SUMMARY
      9. 9. Scalability and Distribution
        1. 9.1. REMOTE CONSOLES
          1. 9.1.1. Configuring Remote Consoles for UNIX
            1. Server Configuration
            2. Client Configuration
          2. 9.1.2. Configuring Remote Consoles for Windows NT/2000
            1. Server Configuration
            2. Client Configuration
          3. 9.1.3. Configuring Remote Consoles for UNIX/Windows
            1. Server Configuration
            2. Client Configuration
        2. 9.2. CONFIGURING THE ON-DEMAND LEVEL FOR A MAP
        3. 9.3. CONFIGURING THE POLLING FREQUENCY
        4. 9.4. DEFINING FILTERS
          1. 9.4.1. The Default Filters File
          2. 9.4.2. The Filters File Syntax
            1. 9.4.2.1. Attribute Value Assertions
            2. 9.4.2.2. Testing Your Filter
          3. 9.4.3. Map Filters
          4. 9.4.4. Discovery Filters
          5. 9.4.5. Topology Filters
          6. 9.4.6. Persistence Filters
          7. 9.4.7. Important Nodes Filter
          8. 9.4.8. DHCP Filters
          9. 9.4.9. Failover Filers
        5. 9.5. DISTRIBUTED INTERNET MONITORING (DIM)
          1. 9.5.1. CS Configuration
          2. 9.5.2. MS Configuration
          3. 9.5.3. Overlapping versus Non-Overlapping Domains
          4. 9.5.4. Troubleshooting DIM
        6. 9.6. SUMMARY
      10. 10. Customer Views
        1. 10.1. THE FIVE ADDITIONAL VIEWS
          1. 10.1.1. The Key Resources View
          2. 10.1.2. The Customers View
          3. 10.1.3. The Devices View
          4. 10.1.4. The Internet Links View
          5. 10.1.5. The Sites View
        2. 10.2. THE OVCUSTOMER UTILITY
          1. 10.2.1. Adding Customer Data
            1. 10.2.1.1. Sample Batch File custInfo.txt
          2. 10.2.2. Listing Customer Data
          3. 10.2.3. Deleting Customer Data
            1. 10.2.2.1. Sample Batch Fiel delCustInfo.txt
          4. 10.2.4. Tips for ovcustomer
        3. 10.3. CONFIGURING THE HIERARCHICAL SUBMAP BUILDER
        4. 10.4. SUMMARY
      11. 11. Service Information Portal
        1. 11.1. GENERIC NET DEMO
        2. 11.2. INTEGRATING SIP WITH NNM
          1. 11.2.1. Configuring Users
          2. 11.2.2. Configuring Roles
          3. 11.2.3. User Role Packages
          4. 11.2.4. Adding an NNM Station to SIP
          5. 11.2.5. Integrating CV Organizations
        3. 11.3. SUMMARY
      12. 12. Introduction to OpenView Operations (OVO)
        1. 12.1. MONITORING THE ENTERPRISE WITH OVO
          1. 12.1.1. OVO Terminology
          2. 12.1.2. OVO, VPO, ITO, and OPC: They're All the Same
        2. 12.2. THE OVO OPERATOR
        3. 12.3. THE OVO ADMINISTRATOR
        4. 12.4. TEMPLATE ADMINISTRATORS
        5. 12.5. SUMMARY
    9. 2. OpenView Operations
      1. 13. Out-of-the-box with HP OpenView Operations
        1. 13.1. CONSIDER A SERVICE LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION
        2. 13.2. PRE- AND POST-SOFTWARE INSTALLATION SUMMARY
          1. 13.2.1. Implementation Tasks
          2. 13.2.2. Installation: Frequently Asked Questions
        3. 13.3. INSTALLING THE MANAGEMENT SERVER
          1. 13.3.1. Hardware and Software Prerequisites
          2. 13.3.2. Prerequisite Patches
          3. 13.3.3. Installing Oracle and OVO Software
        4. 13.4. AGENT SOFTWARE INSTALLATION
        5. 13.5. OPENVIEW STATUS CHECKS
          1. 13.5.1. Check the OpenView Services (NNM)
          2. 13.5.2. Check the OVO Server
          3. 13.5.3. Check the Agents
        6. 13.6. OVO AUTOMATIC STARTUP AT BOOT TIME
        7. 13.7. THE ADMINISTRATOR CONSOLE
        8. 13.8. WINDOWS AND MENUS
        9. 13.9. NODES, NODE GROUPS, NODE LAYOUT GROUPS, NODE HIERARCHIES
          1. 13.9.1. Nodes
          2. 13.9.2. Node Groups
          3. 13.9.3. Node Layout Groups
          4. 13.9.4. Node Hierarchies
        10. 13.10. MESSAGE GROUPS
        11. 13.11. USERS AND USER PROFILES
        12. 13.12. APPLICATIONS
        13. 13.13. THE OPERATOR CONSOLE
        14. 13.14. CONFIGURE A NEW OVO OPERATOR
          1. 13.14.1. Summary of the Process to Create a New Operator
          2. 13.14.2. Functional Tests for the Operator Account
        15. 13.15. CONFIGURE THE MANAGEMENT SERVER
          1. 13.15.1. Initial Message Management
          2. 13.15.2. Control Duplicate Messages
          3. 13.15.3. Example Server Duplicate Message Suppression
          4. 13.15.4. Default OVO X-Window Controls
          5. 13.15.5. Control the Message Group Pop-Up Window
          6. 13.15.6. Colored Lines in the Message Browser
        16. 13.16. WORKING FROM THE COMMAND LINE
        17. 13.17. PROBLEM SOLVING WITH OPENVIEW OPERATIONS
        18. 13.18. OVO SERVER AND NODE RESOURCES
          1. 13.18.1. Processes and Queue Files
          2. 13.18.2. Server Directory Structure
          3. 13.18.3. Server Configuration Files
          4. 13.18.4. Managed Node Directory Structure
          5. 13.18.5. Managed Node Configuration Files
          6. 13.18.6. Error and Log Files
          7. 13.18.7. System Resource Files
        19. 13.19. DOCUMENTATION
        20. 13.20. TOOLS AND RESOURCES
        21. 13.21. SUMMARY OF EXECUTING OVOINSTALL
        22. 13.22. SUMMARY
      2. 14. Agents, Policies and Distribution
        1. 14.1. THE OVO AGENTS
          1. 14.1.1. List of Tasks Performed by the Agents
          2. 14.1.2. The Agent Processes
        2. 14.2. THE OVO MANAGEMENT SERVER PROCESSES
          1. 14.2.1. Tasks Performed by the Server
          2. 14.2.3. The Management Server Processes
        3. 14.3. AGENTS ALIVE AND WELL AT ALL TIMES
          1. 14.3.1. RPC Service
          2. 14.3.2. HTTPS Communication Service
          3. 14.3.3. Functional Tests for Primary Communications
        4. 14.4. AGENT INSTALLATION
          1. 14.4.1. Automatic Install
          2. 14.4.2. Semi-automatic Install for Windows Nodes
          3. 14.4.3. Manual Installation
            1. 14.4.3.1. Example: Manually Install HP (DCE/RPC-based) Node
            2. 14.4.3.2. Example Manual Installation Microsoft Windows Node
          4. 14.4.6. Agent Installation using Secure Shell (ssh)
          5. 14.4.5. Command Line Distribution of Agent Components
        5. 14.5. AGENT CONFIGURATION
          1. 14.5.1. Agent Configuration Files
          2. 14.5.2. Server Configuration Files
          3. 14.5.3. The Message Stream Interface (MSI)
        6. 14.6. POLICIES
          1. 14.6.1. Working with Policy Templates from the GUI
            1. 14.6.1.1. Logfile Templates
            2. 14.6.1.2. Monitors
            3. 14.6.1.3. Messages
            4. 14.6.1.4. Traps
            5. 14.6.1.5. Schedule template
            6. 14.6.1.6. Message Forwarding Templates
            7. 14.6.1.7. Outage Template
            8. 14.6.1.8. Message Regrouping Template
          2. 14.6.2. Working with Template Files
            1. 14.6.2.1. Template Format
          3. 14.6.3. Template Administrator
          4. 14.6.4. Template Groups
            1. 14.6.4.1. Process to Create a New Template Group
            2. 14.6.4.2. Copy and Paste Templates into a Template Group
          5. 14.6.5. Template Assignment
            1. 14.6.5.1. Template to Node Assignment
          6. 14.6.7. Template Files
            1. 14.6.7.1. Templates on the Management Server
            2. 14.6.7.2. Templates on the Managed Node
          7. 14.6.5. Template Status
            1. 14.6.5.1. ovpolicy and opctemplate
            2. 14.6.5.2. Temporarily Disabling and Enabling a Template
        7. 14.7. ACTIONS, MONITORS, COMMANDS AND EXTERNAL NOTIFICATION SERVICES
          1. 14.7.1. Actions
          2. 14.7.2. Monitors
          3. 14.7.3. Trouble Ticket Interface
          4. 14.7.4. External Services
        8. 14.8. USING TEMPLATES FOR MESSAGE SUPPRESSION
        9. 14.9. CONTROL MESSAGES WITH MESSAGE CORRELATION
        10. 14.10. DISTRIBUTION
          1. 14.10.1. Template Group to Node Group Assignment
            1. 14.10.1.1. Assign the Templates to the Nodes or Node Groups
        11. 14.11. SUMMARY
      3. 15. Smart Plug-Ins
        1. 15.1. INSTALLING AN SPI
          1. 15.1.1. Installation Summary
        2. 15.2. COMPONENTS OF AN SPI
          1. 15.2.1. Component in the Message Group Bank
            1. 15.2.1.1. Database SPI Message Group-Administrator View
            2. 15.2.1.2. Database SPI Message Group-Operator View
          2. 15.2.2. Component in the Node Group Bank
            1. 15.2.2.1. Database SPI Node Groups-Administrator View
            2. 15.2.2.2. Database SPI Node Groups-Operators View
          3. 15.2.3. Components in the Application Bank
            1. 15.2.3.1. Database SPI Application Groups
          4. 15.2.4. Components in the Message Source Templates
          5. 15.2.5. The Message Browser
          6. 15.2.6. Directories and Files on the Management Server
          7. 15.2.7. Directories and Files on the Managed Node
        3. 15.3. TYPES OF SPIS
          1. 15.3.1. OpenView SPIs Available from Hewlett Packard
          2. 15.3.2. SPIs Available from HP Partners
            1. 15.3.3. Free Gallery SPIs
        4. 15.4. SPI DOCUMENTATION AND WHITE PAPERS
        5. 15.5. SPI TRAINING
        6. 15.6. SUMMARY
      4. 16. Built-in Performance Tools
        1. 16.1. EMBEDDED PERFORMANCE AGENT (OVOA)
          1. 16.1.1. OVOA Installation
          2. 16.1.2. Performance Data Provided by OVOA
          3. 16.1.3. OVOA versus OVPA
          4. 16.1.4. OVOA Configuration
            1. 16.1.4.1. Deploy the Embedded Performance Agent Template
            2. 16.1.4.2. The Hook Between opcmona and OVOA
          5. 16.1.5. Interface with Other Programs
          6. 16.1.6. Commands and Files
            1. 16.1.6.1. Frequently Used Commands
            2. 16.1.6.2. File Locations
            3. 16.1.6.3. Data Files
        2. 16.2. THE PERFORMANCE AGENT
          1. 16.2.1. OVPA Installation
          2. 16.2.2. OVPA (3.x) Process Environment
          3. 16.2.3. OVPA Startup
          4. 16.2.4. OVPA Configuration
            1. 16.2.4.1. Data Source Log File Types
            2. 16.2.4.2. OVPA Alarm Configuration Example—Contributed by Emil Velez
            3. 16.2.4.3. Examples of Measureware Extractions
            4. 16.2.4.3. Check the OVPA message interface to OVO
          5. 16.2.5. Data Source Integration (DSI)
            1. 16.2.5.1. Data Source Integration Example
            2. 16.2.5.2. Definition of Commands and Terms
          6. 16.2.6. OVPA Interface with Other Programs
          7. 16.2.7. OVPA Commands and Files
          8. 16.2.8. OVPA 4.x
          9. 16.2.9. Examples Directory
          10. 16.2.10. Available Metrics
        3. 16.3. OTHER PERFORMANCE TOOLS
          1. 16.3.1. OV GlancePlus Pack
          2. 16.3.2. OpenView Performance Manager (OVPM) 4.x
          3. 16.3.3. Glance versus OV Performance Manager
          4. 16.3.3.1. Terms and Definitions Used with Glance
          5. 16.3.4. OVPA Applications Integration with OVO
          6. 16.3.5. Network Node Manager
          7. 16.3.6. Databases
          8. 16.3.7. Operating System Built-in Performance Tools
            1. 16.3.7.1. top
            2. 16.3.7.2. sar
            3. 16.3.7.3. vmstat
            4. 16.3.7.4. iostat
            5. 16.3.7.5. nice
            6. 16.3.7.6. ps
            7. 16.3.7.7. size
            8. 16.3.7.8. swapinfo –t
            9. 16.3.7.9. SAM
            10. 16.3.7.10. cron
            11. 16.3.7.11. crontab –l
            12. 16.3.7.12. uptime/ruptime
            13. 16.3.7.13. time and timex
            14. 16.3.7.14. ipcs
            15. 16.3.7.15. bdf and df
        4. 16.4. OPERATING SYSTEM TOOLS INTEGRATION EXAMPLE
        5. 16.5. DOCUMENTS AND REFERENCES
        6. 16.6. SUMMARY
      5. 17. Server Administration
        1. 17.1. SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION RESPONSIBILITIES
        2. 17.2. SYSTEM STARTUP AND SHUTDOWN
          1. 17.2.1. Execution Scripts
          2. 17.2.2. Configuration Variable Files
          3. 17.2.3. Link Files
          4. 17.2.4. The Sequencer Script
        3. 17.3. FILE SYSTEMS AND DISKS
          1. 17.3.1. Check the Disks Available on the System
          2. 17.3.2. Check the Available Capacity of the File Systems
        4. 17. 4. OVO SERVER BACKUP
          1. 17.4.1. Develop a Backup Procedure
          2. 17.4.2. OVO Tools to Perform the Backup
            1. 17.4.2.1. Offline Backup
            2. 17.4.2.2. opc_backup Documentation
            3. 17.4.2.3. Online Backup with ovbackup.ovpl
        5. 17.5. CONFIGURATION DOWNLOAD
          1. 17.5.1. Why Download the Configuration?
          2. 17.5.2. What Can You Download?
          3. 17.5.3. Where Will the Downloaded Configuration End Up?
          4. 17.5.4. How Can You Distribute the Downloaded Configuration?
        6. 17.6. CONFIGURATION UPLOAD
          1. 17.6.1. What Are the Prerequisites for Configuration Upload?
          2. 17.6.2. What If You Only Want to Upload Part of the Configuration?
          3. 17.6.3. How Can You Create a Backup Server?
        7. 17.7. HISTORY DOWNLOAD
          1. 17.7.1. What Is the Process to Download the History Information?
        8. 17.8. AUDITING
        9. 17.9. REPORTING
          1. 17.9.1. Operator Reports
          2. 17.9.2. Administrator Reports
          3. 17.9.3. External Report Programs
          4. 17.9.4. Sample Reports from OV Storage Area Manager
        10. 17.10. UTILITIES AND CONTRIBUTED TOOLS
          1. 17.10.1. Utility Programs
            1. 17.10.1.1. Utility Programs Usage Examples
          2. 17.10.2. Contributed Tools
        11. 17.11. SUMMARY
      6. 18. Oracle for OpenView
        1. 18.1. DATABASE TERMINOLOGY
        2. 18.2. DATABASE STRUCTURES
          1. 18.2.1. Logical Components
          2. 18.2.2. Physical Components
          3. 18.2.3. Memory Components
          4. 18.2.4. User Processes
          5. 18.2.5. Dedicated Server Processes
          6. 18.2.6. Background Processes
        3. 18.3. ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
          1. 18.3.1. User Environment
        4. 18.4. DATABASE FILES AND DIRECTORY LOCATIONS
        5. 18.5. DATABASE STARTUP AND SHUTDOWN
          1. 18.5.1. Automatic Database Startup and Shutdown
          2. 18.5.2. Manual Database Startup and Shutdown
            1. 18.5.2.1. Database Shutdown Command Line Options
        6. 18.6. DATABASE QUERIES
          1. 18.6.1. Basics of Writing SQL Statements
          2. 18.6.2. Examples of Database Queries using SQL
        7. 18.7. DATABASE REPORT
        8. 18.8. DATABASE TOOLS AND RESOURCES
        9. 18.9. SUMMARY
      7. 19. Enterprise Management Flexibility with Multiple Management Servers
        1. 19.1. DISTRIBUTED OPENVIEW SERVER CONCEPTS
          1. 19.1.1. Backup Server
          2. 19.1.2. Competence Center and Escalation
          3. 19.1.3. Follow-the-sun
        2. 19.2. TERMINOLOGY
          1. 19.2.1. OpenView Domain
          2. 19.2.2. Message Forwarding
          3. 19.2.2. Responsible Manager
          4. 19.2.3. Primary Manager
          5. 19.2.4. Original Manager
          6. 19.2.5. Secondary and Action Allowed Managers
          7. 19.2.6. Failover/Takeover/Failback/Takeback
          8. 19.2.7. Escalation
          9. 19.2.8. Switch Control Responsibility
          10. 19.2.9. Sync Configurations
        3. 19.3. DIRECTORIES
          1. 19.3.1. Directories on the Management Server
            1. 19.3.1.1. respmgrs
            2. 19.3.1.2. tmpl_respmgrs
            3. 19.3.1.3. work_repmgrs
        4. 19.4. COMMANDS AND UTILITIES
        5. 19.5. TEMPLATES
          1. 19.5.1. Template Types
          2. 19.5.2. Management Server Templates
            1. 19.5.2.1. Template Activation
          3. 19.5.3. Managed Node Templates
          4. 19.5.4. Template Distribution
            1. 19.5.4.1. Template File Names that Change after Distribution
            2. 19.5.4.2. Convert IP Address to Hex Number
            3. 19.5.4.2. Rename the allnodes File for a Specific Node
          5. 19.5.5. Template Syntax
            1. 19.5.5.1. Time Template
            2. 19.5.5.2. Keywords for the Time Templates
            3. 19.5.5.3. Time Template Syntax
            4. 19.5.5.4. Message Template
            5. 19.5.5.4. Keywords for Responsible Manager Configuration
            6. 19.5.5.5. Forwarding All Messages with Time Criteria
            7. 19.5.5.6. Forwarding Some Messages without Time Criteria
            8. 19.5.5.7. Forwarding Messages to the Primary Manager
            9. 19.5.5.8. Message-forwarding Syntax
          6. 19.5.6. Sample MoM Templates
        6. 19.6. MESSAGE FORWARDING
          1. 19.6.1. Message-Forwarding Cookbook
            1. 19.6.2.1. Management server configuration tasks
            2. 19.6.2.3. Message Forwarding Attributes
        7. 19.7. BUILDING A BACKUP SERVER
          1. 19.7.1. OpenView Failover Concepts
        8. 19.8. ESCALATIONS
          1. 19.8.1. Process Steps to Create the Escalation Template
          2. 19.8.2. Sample Escalation Template
        9. 19.9 CONFIGURATION VARIABLES
        10. 19.10. SUMMARY
    10. 3. OpenView Best Practices
      1. 20. Security
        1. 20.1. DCE-RPC PROCESSES AND COMMUNICATIONS
          1. 20.1.1. Open Agents' Advantages
            1. 20.1.1.1. RPC-based Open Agent Functional Areas
            2. 20.1.1.2. Agent Software Distribution
            3. 20.1.1.3. Open Agent Process Descriptions
        2. 20.2. GENERAL TCP/IP AND RPC COMMUNICATIONS
        3. 20.3. NON-RPC AGENTS
        4. 20.4. HTTP PROXY AGENT
        5. 20.5. USERS AND PASSWORDS
          1. 20.5.1. Administrators
          2. 20.5.2. Operators
        6. 20.6. FILES AND DATA
        7. 20.7. AUDITS
        8. 20.8. ENHANCED SECURITY
          1. 20.8.1. Data Encryption Standard (DES)—Private Key
          2. 20.8.2. RSA—Public Key
          3. 20.8.3. Kerberos
          4. 20.8.4. Distributed Compute Environment (DCE)
          5. 20.8.5. GSS APIs
          6. 20.8.6. HTTP and S-HTTP
          7. 20.8.7. Secure Socket Layer (SSL)
          8. 20.8.8. PAM Authentication
          9. 20.8.9. SOAP (XML)
        9. 20.9. GENERAL SECURITY MEASURES
        10. 20.10. SUDO
          1. 20.10.1. Download the Public Domain Sudo Program
        11. 20.11. SECURE SHELL (SSH) FOR HP-UX
          1. 20.11.1. General Installation and Configuration
          2. 20.11.2. OVO Agent Installation Using SSH
        12. 20.12. THE FIREWALL
          1. 20.12.1. Proxy Filter
        13. 20.13. SUMMARY
      2. 21. Plan, Document, Take Corrective Actions, Administer Changes
        1. 21.1. PLANNING THE OVO ENVIRONMENT
          1. 21.1.1. Architecture
          2. 21.1.2. The Systems
          3. 21.1.3. The Applications
        2. 21.2. OVO DOCUMENTATION
          1. 21.2.1. Documenting the Network Layout
          2. 21.2.2. Documenting Nodes, Node Groups, and Templates
          3. 21.2.3. Documenting Applications and Operator Configuration
          4. 21.2.4. Documenting SPIs
          5. 21.2.5. Operator Documentation
        3. 21.3. CORRECTIVE ACTIONS
          1. 21.4. Changing the OVO Environment
          2. 21.4.1. Administrator Changes
          3. 21.4.2. Template Administrator Changes
          4. 21.4.3. Operator Changes
        4. 21.5. SUMMARY
      3. 22. Troubleshooting Tools and Techniques
        1. 22.1. DATA GATHERING TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS
          1. 22.1.1. Check for Errors
            1. 22.1.1.1. Review the Log Files
            2. 22.1.1.2. OVO Errors
            3. 22.1.1.3. Oracle Errors
          2. 22.1.2. Check, Stop, or Start the OpenView Processes
            1. 22.1.2.1. Check Server and Agent Process Status
          3. 22.1.3. Utilize the Online Help
          4. 22.1.4. The itochecker Report
            1. 22.1.4.1. Run the itochecker Report
        2. 22.2. FUNCTIONAL CHECKS
          1. 22.2.1. When the Processes Will Not Start
            1. 22.2.1.1. Procedure to Remove the Queue Files on the Server
            2. 22.2.1.2. Procedure to Remove the Queue Files on the Node
        3. 22.3. PROBLEM SOLVING
        4. 22.4. SELF-HEALING SERVICES (SHS)
        5. 22.5. SUMMARY
    11. 4. OpenView Operations for Windows
      1. 23. Introducing OVO for Windows
        1. 23.1. ARCHITECTURE
          1. 23.1.1. Management Server
            1. 23.1.1.1. Microsoft Management Console
            2. 23.1.1.2. Web-Based Enterprise Management and WMI
            3. 23.1.1.3. Component Object Model and DCOM
          2. 23.1.2. OVOW Management Console
          3. 23.1.3. Managed Nodes
        2. 23.2. INSTALLATION
          1. 23.2.3. Product Summary
          2. 23.2.4. Installation Summary
          3. 23.2.5. Product Directory Structure
            1. 23.2.6. Product Documentation
            2. 23.2.7. Product Demonstration
            3. 23.2.8. Training
        3. 23.3. EXPLORING THE FEATURES OF THE CONSOLE
        4. 23.4. MESSAGE PROCESSING
          1. 23.4.1. Policies, Actions and Tools
        5. 23.5. SUMMARY
      2. 24. OVO Windows and OVO UNIX Interoperability
        1. 24.1. OVOW and OVOU Communications
          1. 24.1.1. Server-to-Server Alive Checks
        2. 24.2. Message Forwarding
          1. 24.2.1. Message Forwarding Rules
        3. 24.3. Policy, Template, and Service Data Exchange
          1. 24.3.1. OVOW to OVOU
          2. 24.3.2. OVOU to OVOW
          3. 24.3.3. Interoperability Commands
        4. 24.4. Comparing Features of OVOU and OVOW
        5. 24.5. Summary
      3. 25. OVOW Implementation Tasks
        1. 25.1. AUTO-DISCOVERY AND AUTO-DEPLOYMENT
          1. 25.1.1. Service Discovery
          2. 25.1.2. Node Discovery
        2. 25.2. ADD NODES
        3. 25.3. CREATE AND DEPLOY POLICIES
        4. 25.4. TOOLS, AUTOMATIC COMMANDS, AND SERVICES
          1. 25.4.1. Tools
          2. 25.4.2. Automatic Commands
          3. 25.4.3. Services
        5. 25.5. SUMMARY
      4. A. OpenView Commands Quick Reference Guide
        1. A.1. NETWORK NODE MANAGER COMMANDS
        2. A.2. CUSTOMER VIEWS AND SERVICE INFORMATION PORTAL COMMANDS
        3. A.3. OPENVIEW OPERATIONS COMMANDS
      5. B. Hostname Resolution
        1. B.1. THE DEFINITION OF HOSTNAME
        2. B.2. SETTING A SYSTEMS HOSTNAME
          1. B.2.1. Incorrect /etc/hosts, NIS, and DNS Configuration
        3. B.3. ARE /ETC/HOSTS, NIS, AND DNS CONFIGURED PROPERLY?
          1. B.3.1. Proper Configuration of Naming Services
          2. B.3.2. NNM, SNMP, and Hostname Resolution
            1. B.3.2.1. Properly Configured /etc/hosts
              1. The Official Hostname
              2. The /etc/nsswitch.conf File
              3. The /etc/hosts File
              4. How Hostname Resolution Determines Route Determination
          3. B.3.3. Properly Configured NIS
            1. B.3.3.1. The Domain Name
              1. The CDE Calendar Manager Service Daemon
              2. Sendmail and NIS
              3. B.3.3.1.1. The NIS Hosts Map
              4. Putting It All Together using NIS
              5. B.3.3.1.2. Network File System (NFS) and NIS
              6. The Netmasks File
              7. Automounted Directories
              8. B.3.3.1.3. The r-commands and NIS
              9. B.3.3.1.4. OpenView Operations and NIS
              10. B.3.3.1.5. OpenView Operations and Agent Communication
            2. B.3.3.2. OpenView Products and the DNS
            3. B.3.3.3. Properly Configuring the DNS
              1. B.3.3.3.1. The /etc/resolv.conf File
              2. B.3.3.3.2. Forward Lookups
              3. B.3.3.3.3. Reverse Lookups
              4. B.3.3.3.4. Testing Resolution: nsquery versus nslookup
            4. B.3.3.4. Sendmail and the DNS
            5. B.3.3.5. NFS and the DNS
            6. B.3.3.6. The r-commands and the DNS
            7. B.3.3.7. Traceroute
          4. B.3.4. Windows NT and Hostname Resolution
        4. B.4. SUMMARY
      6. C. Resources
        1. C.1. BOOKS
        2. C.2. CERTIFICATION
        3. C.3. DATABASES
        4. C.4. HP INFORMATION AND RESOURCES
        5. C.5. JAVA
        6. C.6. LDAP
        7. C.7. MANAGED NODES
        8. C.8. MIBS
        9. C.9. NETWORKING AND SERVICE MANAGEMENT
        10. C.10. OPENVIEW SELF HEALING SERVICES
        11. C.11. OPENVIEW DOCUMENTATION, SUPPORT, AND PRODUCT RESOURCES
        12. C. 12 PERFORMANCE
        13. C. 13 RFCS
        14. C.14. SECURITY
        15. C.15. SOFTWARE
        16. C.16. SNMP
        17. C.17. SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION
        18. C.18. TRAINING
        19. C.19. TROUBLESHOOTING
        20. C.20. USER GROUPS
        21. C.21. UNIX
        22. C.22. WHITE PAPERS