O'Reilly logo

How to Innovate in Marketing (Collection), 2/e by Tony Davila, Robert Shelton, Joan Kiddon, Larry Light, Michael Tasner, Monique Reece, Marc Epstein

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

25. Forecasting Demand

A marketing plan must include a forecast of the market opportunity size, which is the estimated number of potential buyers of your products and services. From this, the addressable market size is estimated by analyzing who is available to purchase the product, has the means to do so, and has access to your products. This number will be a more conservative subset of the market size. From this, the company must decide what portion of the market it will penetrate. For example, if a new snack product will be launched by a company, it probably won’t launch in all markets at once. The company would select a few test markets to roll out first. The target market number would be projected from the addressable market.

New markets ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required