You are previewing Homeland Security Preparedness and Information Systems: Strategies for Managing Public Policy.
O'Reilly logo
Homeland Security Preparedness and Information Systems: Strategies for Managing Public Policy

Book Description

Homeland Security Preparedness and Information Systems: Strategies for Managing Public Policy delves into the issues and challenges that public managers face in the adoption and implementation of information systems for homeland security. This publication provides solutions for those interested in adopting additional information systems security measures in their governments.

Table of Contents

  1. Copyright
  2. Foreword
  3. Preface
  4. Acknowledgment
  5. Background Information
    1. Homeland Security Preparedness
      1. INRODUCTION
      2. BACKGROUND
      3. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
      4. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF HOMELAND SECURITY
      5. HOMELAND SECURITY COLLABORATION
      6. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND HOMELAND SECURITY
      7. RESEARCH METHODS
      8. DESCRIPTIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF CITY MANAGERS AND THEIR GOVERNMENTS
      9. POSSIBLE TERRORIST THREATS
      10. TYPES OF HOMELAND SECURITY EQUIPMENT PURCHASED
      11. HOMELAND SECURITY FUNDING
      12. COLLABORATION AND HOMELAND SECURITY
      13. HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION ASSESSMENT
      14. RATING HOMELAND SECURITY COLLABORATION
      15. HOMELAND SECURITY COLLABORATION AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT
      16. MANAGEMENT CONCERNS AND HOMELAND SECURITY
      17. ORGANIZATIONAL ASPECTS OF HOMELAND SECURITY
      18. CITY GOVERNMENT HOMELAND SECURITY ASSESSMENT
      19. HURRICANE KATRINA, INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND PREPAREDNESS
      20. CONCLUSION
      21. REFERENCES
      22. APPENDIX A: CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE SUMMARY OF THE HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002
    2. Citizen-Centric E-Government
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. EXISTING RESEARCH ON CIOs
      3. CITIZEN-CENTRIC E-GOVERNMENT ADOPTION
      4. CLINGER-COHEN ACT AND CIOs
      5. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT OF PUBLIC SECTOR CIOs
      6. CITIZEN-CENTRIC FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND E-GOVERNMENT
      7. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
      8. MANAGEMENT CAPACITY
      9. SECURITY AND PRIVACY
      10. TOP MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
      11. E-GOVERNMENT PROJECT MANAGEMENT
      12. MANAGERIAL INNOVATION
      13. LACK OF RESOURCE CAPACITY
      14. CHARACTERISTICS OF FEDERAL CIOs
      15. CIOs OPINIONS ON E-GOVERNMENT
      16. OPEN ENDED RESPONSES
      17. EXAMPLES OF CITIZEN-CENTRIC GOVERNMENT AND HSIS
      18. CONCLUSION
      19. REFERENCES
      20. APPENDIX A: CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE SUMMARY OF THE E-GOVERNMENT ACT OF 2002
    3. Collaboration and E-Government
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. BACKGROUND
      3. INFORMATION SHARING
      4. NATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE MODEL
      5. ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE AND HSIS
      6. COLLABORATIVE MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES AND E-GOVERNMENT
      7. COLLABORATION AND E-GOVERNMENT CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
      8. SURVEY RESULTS
      9. STATE GOVERNMENT CIOS AND THEIR GOVERNMENTS
      10. LEVELS OF COLLABORATION AND E-GOVERNMENT
      11. COLLABORATION AND E-GOVERNMENT WITHIN STATE GOVERNMENTS
      12. COLLABORATION AND STATE E-GOVERNMENT PROJECTS
      13. CONCLUSION
      14. REFERENCES
  6. Homeland Security Information Systems in Government
    1. Federal Government Homeland Security Information Systems
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
      3. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USED AT DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
      4. HOMELAND SECURITY ENVIRONMENT
      5. COMPUTER SECURITY ACT
      6. PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT
      7. CLINGER-COHEN ACT
      8. E-GOVERNMENT ACT
      9. CHALLENGES, ROLES, AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF FEDERAL CIOs
      10. PRINCIPLES OF EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT AND IT
      11. DATA COLLECTION METHODS
      12. HSIS IMPACT ON CIO ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
      13. HSIS IMPACT ON TOP IT CHALLENGES FOR CIOs
      14. HSIS AND IT MANAGEMENT CAPABILITIES
      15. HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS AND HSIS
      16. CONCLUSION
      17. REFERENCES
    2. Information Technology and Emergency Management
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. FUNCTIONS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
      3. EMERGENCY PLANNING
      4. INTERGOVERNMENTAL AND COLLABORATION
      5. CITIZENS AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
      6. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
      7. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES
      8. IT ISSUES AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
      9. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND FEMA
      10. EXPEDITED ASSISTANCE
      11. EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM
      12. SURVEY METHODS AND SUMMARY RESULTS
      13. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AND PREPAREDNESS
      14. IT AND THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT FUNCTION
      15. CONCLUSION
      16. REFERENCES
    3. Local Government Homeland Security Information Systems
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. BACKGROUND ON LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
      3. STAGES OF LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT DEVELOPMENT
      4. INFORMATION AND HOMELAND SECURITY
      5. HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY SYSTEM
      6. NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
      7. SURVEYS ON LOCAL HSIS
      8. DATA AND METHODS
      9. HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION SYSTEMS INITIATIVES
      10. FEDERAL/STATE FUNDING FOR HOMELAND SECURITY RELATED PROGRAMS
      11. LOCAL GOVERNMENT OWN-SOURCE FUNDING FOR HOMELAND SECURITY INITIATIVES
      12. QUALITY OF HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION RECEIVED FROM FEDERAL AND STATE GOVERNMENTS
      13. LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND HSIS
      14. TRAINING METHODS THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS PREFER
      15. CONCLUSION
      16. REFERENCES
  7. Emerging Issues
    1. Citizens, the Internet, and Terrorism Information
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. DIGITAL DIVIDE
      3. TRUST AND SATISFACTION
      4. CITIZEN-INITIATED CONTACTS
      5. SURVEY RESULTS OF CITIZEN ONLINE ACCESS
      6. EMERGENCIES AND THE INTERNET
      7. CONCLUSION
      8. REFERENCES
    2. Information Security in Government
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. INFORMTION SECURITY ISSUES
      3. MANAGEMENT AND INFORMATION SECURITY
      4. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND INFORMATION SECURITY
      5. INFORMATION SECURITY POLICY
      6. EDUCATION
      7. DETERRENCE AND PREVENTION
      8. USERS AND INFORMATION SECURITY
      9. INFORMATION SECURITY THREATS
      10. CYBERSECURITY AND CYBERTERRORISM
      11. INFORMATION SECURITY SURVEYS
      12. TEXAS STATE AGENCY INFORATION SECURITY SURVEY
      13. CAUSES OF INFORMATION SECURITY INCIDENTS
      14. INFORMATION SECURITY AND THE INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT
      15. INFORMATION SECURITY SUPPORT, RESOURCES, AND PREPAREDNESS
      16. THREATS TO INFORMATION SECURITY
      17. EFFECTIVENESS OF THREAT PROTECTION MECHANISMS
      18. CONCLUSION
      19. REFERENCES
    3. Emergency Management Websites
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. WEBSITES AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
      3. E-GOVERNMENT GROWTH MODELS
      4. LEVELS OF ADOPTION OF E-GOVERNMENT WEBSITES
      5. FACTORS OF E-GOVERNMENT WEBSITE ADOPTION
      6. BENCHMARKING E-GOVERNMENT WEBSITES
      7. TRANSPARENCY AND ACCESSIBILITY AND E-GOVERNMENT WEBSITES
      8. FEMA DISASTER DECLARATIONS
      9. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT WEBSITE CONTENT ANALYSIS
      10. CONCLUSION
      11. REFERENCES
    4. Conclusion
      1. INTRODUCTION
      2. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
      3. PREVALENCE OF HSIS IN GOVERNMENTS
      4. CITIZENS, INFORMATION SECURITY, AND ONLINE INFORMATION
      5. FUTURE RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONS
      6. REFERENCES
  8. Selected Readings from the Author
    1. Perceived Effectiveness of E-Government and its Usage in City Governments: Survey Evidence from Information Technology Directors
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CONCLUSION
      4. REFERENCES
    2. E-Government and Creating a Citizen-Centric Government: A Study of Federal Government CIOs
      1. ABSTRACT
      2. INTRODUCTION
      3. CLINGER-COHEN ACT AND CIOs
      4. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT OF PUBLIC-SECTOR CIOs
      5. CITIZEN-CENTRIC FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND E-GOVERNMENT
      6. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
      7. CHARACTERISTICS OF FEDERAL CIOs
      8. CIOs' OPINIONS ON E-GOVERNMENT
      9. DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS OF DEPENDENT AND PREDICTOR VARIABLES
      10. RESULTS OF OLS REGRESSION MODEL
      11. DISCUSSION OF HYPOTHESES
      12. CONCLUSION
      13. ACKNOWLEDGMENT
      14. REFERENCES
  9. About the Author
  10. Index