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Home Area Networks and IPTV

Book Description

The field of Home Area Networks (HAN), a dedicated residential subset of LAN technologies for home-based use, is fast becoming the next frontier for the communications industry.

This book describes the various technologies involved in the implementation of a HAN: high-speed Internet connections, indoor implementations, services, software, and management packages. It also reviews multimedia applications (which are increasingly the most important and complex aspects of most HANs) with a detailed description of IPTV technology. It highlights the main technologies used for HANs: information transmission by means of copper pairs, coaxial cables, fiber optics, and Wi-Fi radio systems, as well as the software systems necessary for the processing and management of these data communications. These technologies - examples of which include the well-known 802.11 family of standards, and less widespread applications such as the HomePlug powerline standard - are highly relevant to multimedia, remote healthcare, remote working, energy, and device management in the home.

The book is written for engineers working in the field, or who are interested in high-speed communication technologies and their actual or potential use in the home or in the small - medium size enterprise (SME) commercial environment.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright
  4. Chapter 1: Services Offered by Home Area Networks
    1. 1.1. Why home networking?
    2. 1.2. Service convergence
      1. 1.2.1. Triple play
      2. 1.2.2. Quadruple play
      3. 1.2.3. Services linked to the person
      4. 1.2.4. Home services, energy saving, intelligent housing
    3. 1.3. IP or non-IP home area networks
      1. 1.3.1. Comparison with automobiles: the requirement of standards for home networks
    4. 1.4. Bibliography
    5. 1.5. Appendix: the uses of very high bit rates
      1. 1.5.1. Progressive deployment
      2. 1.5.2. Client ubiquity
  5. Chapter 2: Receiving Television via Internet: IPTV
    1. 2.1. Introduction
    2. 2.2. Digital TV formats (DVB and MPEG standards)
      1. 2.2.1. MPEG
      2. 2.2.2. DVB
        1. 2.2.2.1. Composition of the elements transmitted by a DVB stream
        2. 2.2.2.2. Signaling tables
          1. 2.2.2.2.1. NIT (Network Information Table)
          2. 2.2.2.2.2. SDT: Service Description Table
          3. 2.2.2.2.3. EIT: Event Information Table
          4. 2.2.2.2.4. BAT: Bouquet Association Table
          5. 2.2.2.2.5. PAT: Program Association Table
          6. 2.2.2.2.6. PMT: Program Map Table
          7. 2.2.2.2.7. Access control: service encryption
          8. 2.2.2.2.8. Access control: service decryption
          9. 2.2.2.2.9. CAT: Conditional Access Table
    3. 2.3. Digital TV transmission through IP 2.3.1. History and market
      1. 2.3.1. History and market
        1. 2.3.1.1. History
        2. 2.3.1.2. The market
      2. 2.3.2. The evolution of consumer trends
        1. 2.3.2.1. Linear television
        2. 2.3.2.2. Deferred television
        3. 2.3.2.3. Television on demand
        4. 2.3.2.4. Web TV
        5. 2.3.2.5. Broadcasting methods
    4. 2.4. IPTV: elements of the network
      1. 2.4.1. General points
      2. 2.4.2. Data transmission in an IPTV network
      3. 2.4.3. Quality of service
        1. 2.4.3.1. Jitter and latency
        2. 2.4.3.2. Bursts
        3. 2.4.3.3. Ethernet packet losses
        4. 2.4.3.4. FEC (Forward Error Correction) protocol
      4. 2.4.4. IP channel-switching
      5. 2.4.5. IPTV in a local loop
    5. 2.5. Set-top box (STB) hardware and software design
      1. 2.5.1. IPTV middleware
      2. 2.5.2. Content protection
      3. 2.5.3. Interactivity
    6. 2.6. Bibliography
    7. 2.7. Appendix: notes on digital television
      1. 2.7.1. Video
      2. 2.7.2. Screens, size and resolution
      3. 2.7.3. Production
  6. Chapter 3: Household Internet Connections
    1. 3.1. Network cables
      1. 3.1.1. Introduction
      2. 3.1.2. Communication media
        1. 3.1.2.1. Mechanical characteristics
        2. 3.1.2.2. Electrical characteristics
        3. 3.1.2.3. Types of cable
        4. 3.1.2.4. Standardized cables
        5. 3.1.2.5. Transported frequencies
      3. 3.1.3. The DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS standard
        1. 3.1.3.1. Introduction
        2. 3.1.3.2. Evolution of the DOCSIS standard Three DOCSIS standards have been defined.
      4. 3.1.4. Modems and DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS CMTS
      5. 3.1.5. RF DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS signals
        1. 3.1.5.1. Frequency plans
        2. 3.1.5.2. Channel modulation
        3. 3.1.5.3. Signal quality
        4. 3.1.5.4. Quality of service is dependent on three elements
      6. 3.1.6. Sizing optical nodes for DOCSIS services
      7. 3.1.7. Digital Television
        1. 3.1.7.1. Modulation of TV services
      8. 3.1.8. Analog television
      9. 3.1.9. The last mile: from local loop VHF to fiber
        1. 3.1.9.1. History of VHF networks
        2. 3.1.9.2. HFC networks (1998–2006)
        3. 3.1.9.3. FTTLA networks and fiber
      10. 3.1.10. Transport and distribution of signals from headend to local loops
        1. 3.1.10.1. Headends I and II in centralized architecture
        2. 3.1.10.2. The backbone (IP)
        3. 3.1.10.3. The MPLS backbone
    2. 3.2. Internet access by means of outdoor PLC
      1. 3.2.1. Structure of an electrical supply network
      2. 3.2.2. Use of the electric pair by PLC
      3. 3.2.3. Frequencies used by PLC
      4. 3.2.4. PLC standards
      5. 3.2.5. Administration of an outdoor PLC
    3. 3.3. Fiber optics to the home (FTTH)
      1. 3.3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.3.2. Fiber optic technologies
        1. 3.3.2.1. Single-mode fiber
        2. 3.3.2.2. Multimode step index fiber (200/380)
        3. 3.3.2.3. Graded index multimode fiber
      3. 3.3.3. Fiber optic cables
      4. 3.3.4. Lasers, LEDs and optical receivers
      5. 3.3.5. Fiber optic subscriber connections: FTTx
        1. 3.3.5.1. GPON architectures
          1. 3.3.5.1.1. Standards
          2. 3.3.5.1.2. Devices
          3. 3.3.5.1.3. The protocols
        2. 3.3.5.2. E-PON architectures
          1. 3.3.5.2.1. Principle and standards
          2. 3.3.5.2.2. Comparison of E-PON protocols with G-PON
        3. 3.3.5.3. Convergence
      6. 3.3.6. Fiber to the Home (FTTH)
    4. 3.4. xDSL networks
      1. 3.4.1. Introduction
      2. 3.4.2.General points
      3. 3.4.3. ADSL technology
      4. 3.4.4. Data organization: ADSL frame and superframe
      5. 3.4.5. Elements of ADSL access
        1. 3.4.5.1. The customer filter (splitter)
          1. 3.4.5.1.1. The master filter
          2. 3.4.5.1.2. Distributed filter
        2. 3.4.5.2. Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM)
          1. 3.4.5.2.1. The Broadband Access Server (BAS)
          2. 3.4.5.2.2. Remote Authentication Dial in User Service (RADIUS)
      6. 3.4.6. Protocol architecture for ADSL
        1. 3.4.6.1. CBR (Constant Bit Rate)
        2. 3.4.6.2. VBR 3 (Variable Bit Rate)
        3. 3.4.6.3. AAL (ATM Adaptation Layer)
        4. 3.4.6.4. Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)
        5. 3.4.6.5. Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE)
        6. 3.4.6.6. PPPoA (Point-to-Point Protocol over AAL5)
      7. 3.4.7. Gigabit Ethernet transmission
      8. 3.4.8. Unbundling
      9. 3.4.9. Services over an ADSL network
        1. 3.4.9.1. ADSL service platforms: network middleware
        2. 3.4.9.2. Towards a distributed network
    5. 3.5. High bit rate radio: satellite, WiMAX and LTE
      1. 3.5.1. Introduction
      2. 3.5.2. Worldwide Inter-operability for Microwave Access (WiMAX)
        1. 3.5.2.1. Brief description of WiMAX
          1. 3.5.2.1.1. MAC layer/datalink
          2. 3.5.2.1.2. Physical layer
      3. 3.5.3. LTE (-SAE)
      4. 3.5.4. Internet by satellite
    6. 3.6. Bibliography
  7. Chapter 4: Home Area Network Technologies
    1. 4.1. Copper pair cables
    2. 4.2. The home network in coaxial cable
      1. 4.2.1. Communication mediums
      2. 4.2.2. Transported signals: DOCSIS/EURODOCSIS
      3. 4.2.3. Terminal section
      4. 4.2.4. FTTLA beyond 2012
    3. 4.3. Home networks using indoor power line communications
      1. 4.3.1. Standards and norms
      2. 4.3.2. Possibility of two different networks
      3. 4.3.3. Safeguarding the local network
      4. 4.3.4. Analysis and administration
    4. 4.4. LTE femtocells
      1. 4.4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.4.2. The LTE standard and femtocells
    5. 4.5. Plastic optical fibers
      1. 4.5.1. POF transmission
      2. 4.5.2. IEEE 1394 standard
      3. 4.5.3. Recognition of other mediums and external connections
    6. 4.6. WiFi home area networks
      1. 4.6.1. Introduction
      2. 4.6.2. General points
      3. 4.6.3. Connection to the Internet using radio waves
      4. 4.6.4. Wi-Fi protocol layers
        1. 4.6.4.1. The datalink layer
        2. 4.6.4.2. CRC (checksum control)
        3. 4.6.4.3. Fragmentation and reassembly
        4. 4.6.4.4. 802.11 frame format
      5. 4.6.5. Successive Wi-Fi standards
      6. 4.6.6. Transmission technologies
        1. 4.6.6.1. Spectrum spreading techniques
      7. 4.6.7. Wi-Fi network deployment
        1. 4.6.7.1. “Infrastructure” mode
        2. 4.6.7.2. Ad hoc mode
        3. 4.6.7.3. Rules of deployment
        4. 4.6.7.4. Antennas
      8. 4.6.8. Privacy
        1. 4.6.8.1. WEP key
        2. 4.6.8.2. WPA
        3. 4.6.8.3. Security in pre-shared key mode
        4. 4.6.8.4. EAP mechanisms offered by WPA-Enterprise and WPA2-Enterprise
      9. 4.6.9. 802.11n: the future of Wi-Fi
        1. 4.6.9.1. Health risks of Wi-Fi
        2. 4.6.9.2. Security risks
    7. 4.7. Home gateway
    8. 4.8. Bibliography
  8. Chapter 5: Software Structure used in Home Area Networks
    1. 5.1. Characteristics of Home Area Networks
      1. 5.1.1. Heterogeneity
      2. 5.1.2. Dynamicity
      3. 5.1.3. Absence of an administrator
    2. 5.2. The digital leisure network: UPNP/DLNA
      1. 5.2.1. The UPNP/DLNA organization and certification
      2. 5.2.2. Devices, service and action models
      3. 5.2.3. Classes of devices: home, mobile, internetwork
        1. 5.2.3.1. Category 1: Home Network Device (HND)
        2. 5.2.3.2. Category 2: Mobile Handheld Device (MHD)
        3. 5.2.3.3. Category 3: Home Infrastructure Device (HID)
      4. 5.2.4. Formats: images, audio, video
      5. 5.2.5. Network and transport of media
        1. 5.2.5.1. HTTP
        2. 5.2.5.2. IP addressing
      6. 5.2.6. Conclusion
    3. 5.3. Home systems networks
      1. 5.3.1. The needs of home systems networks
      2. 5.3.2. MAC and physical layers on an RF network: IEEE 802.15.4
        1. 5.3.2.1. The physical layer
        2. 5.3.2.2. The media access layer (MAC)
        3. 5.3.2.3. Non-beacon network
        4. 5.3.2.4. Beacon-sending network
        5. 5.3.2.5. Description of the CAP and CFP
        6. 5.3.2.6. Use of the CFP and GTS
      3. 5.3.3. Networking and datalinking over an RF network: example of ZigBee
      4. 5.3.4. Networking and datalinking over an electric cabled network
        1. 5.3.4.1. Review of PLC standards
        2. 5.3.4.2. Example of the Watteco™ (Watt Pulse Communication, or WPC) solution
  9. Chapter 6: Software Structures in Use for Home Area Networks
    1. 6.1. Service gateways
      1. 6.1.1. The role of a service gateway
      2. 6.1.2. Service administration: OSGi bundles
        1. 6.1.2.1. Service administration: example of OSGi management
      3. 6.1.3. Collection and redistribution of information: contexts and methods
    2. 6.2. Security in home systems and multimedia networks
      1. 6.2.1. Service access methods
      2. 6.2.2. Virtual networks (VPN)
    3. 6.3. Bibliography
  10. Chapter 7: Service Platforms
    1. 7.1. Service platform for a managed network
      1. 7.1.1. Services
      2. 7.1.2. Servers
    2. 7.2. Internet kiosk on an unmanaged network
      1. 7.2.1. General points
      2. 7.2.2. Security
      3. 7.2.3. Private life
      4. 7.2.4. Development languages of applications
    3. 7.3. Sharing resources
  11. Glossary
  12. Index