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High Performance Web Sites

Cover of High Performance Web Sites by Steve Souders Published by O'Reilly Media, Inc.
  1. High Performance Web Sites
    1. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
    2. Praise for High Performance Web Sites
    3. Foreword
    4. Preface
      1. How This Book Is Organized
      2. Conventions Used in This Book
      3. Code Examples
      4. Comments and Questions
      5. Safari® Books Online
      6. Acknowledgments
    5. 1. The Importance of Frontend Performance
      1. Tracking Web Page Performance
      2. Where Does the Time Go?
      3. The Performance Golden Rule
    6. 2. HTTP Overview
      1. Compression
      2. Conditional GET Requests
      3. Expires
      4. Keep-Alive
      5. There's More
    7. 3. Rule 1: Make Fewer HTTP Requests
      1. Image Maps
      2. CSS Sprites
      3. Inline Images
      4. Combined Scripts and Stylesheets
      5. Conclusion
    8. 4. Rule 2: Use a Content Delivery Network
      1. Content Delivery Networks
      2. The Savings
    9. 5. Rule 3: Add an Expires Header
      1. Expires Header
      2. Max-Age and mod_expires
      3. Empty Cache vs. Primed Cache
      4. More Than Just Images
      5. Revving Filenames
      6. Examples
    10. 6. Rule 4: Gzip Components
      1. How Compression Works
      2. What to Compress
      3. The Savings
      4. Configuration
      5. Proxy Caching
      6. Edge Cases
      7. Gzip in Action
    11. 7. Rule 5: Put Stylesheets at the Top
      1. Progressive Rendering
      2. sleep.cgi
      3. Blank White Screen
      4. Flash of Unstyled Content
      5. What's a Frontend Engineer to Do?
    12. 8. Rule 6: Put Scripts at the Bottom
      1. Problems with Scripts
      2. Parallel Downloads
      3. Scripts Block Downloads
      4. Worst Case: Scripts at the Top
      5. Best Case: Scripts at the Bottom
      6. Putting It in Perspective
    13. 9. Rule 7: Avoid CSS Expressions
      1. Updating Expressions
      2. Working Around the Problem
      3. Conclusion
    14. 10. Rule 8: Make JavaScript and CSS External
      1. Inline vs. External
      2. Typical Results in the Field
      3. Home Pages
      4. The Best of Both Worlds
    15. 11. Rule 9: Reduce DNS Lookups
      1. DNS Caching and TTLs
      2. The Browser's Perspective
      3. Reducing DNS Lookups
    16. 12. Rule 10: Minify JavaScript
      1. Minification
      2. Obfuscation
      3. The Savings
      4. Examples
      5. Icing on the Cake
    17. 13. Rule 11: Avoid Redirects
      1. Types of Redirects
      2. How Redirects Hurt Performance
      3. Alternatives to Redirects
    18. 14. Rule 12: Remove Duplicate Scripts
      1. Duplicate Scripts—They Happen
      2. Duplicate Scripts Hurt Performance
      3. Avoiding Duplicate Scripts
    19. 15. Rule 13: Configure ETags
      1. What's an ETag?
      2. The Problem with ETags
      3. ETags: Use 'Em or Lose 'Em
      4. ETags in the Real World
    20. 16. Rule 14: Make Ajax Cacheable
      1. Web 2.0, DHTML, and Ajax
      2. Asynchronous = Instantaneous?
      3. Optimizing Ajax Requests
      4. Caching Ajax in the Real World
    21. 17. Deconstructing 10 Top Sites
      1. Page Weight, Response Time, YSlow Grade
      2. How the Tests Were Done
      3. Amazon
      4. AOL
      5. CNN
      6. eBay
      7. Google
      8. MSN
      9. MySpace
      10. Wikipedia
      11. Yahoo!
      12. YouTube
    22. Index
    23. About the Author
    24. Colophon
    25. SPECIAL OFFER: Upgrade this ebook with O’Reilly
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The Best of Both Worlds

Even if all the factors point to inlining, it still feels inefficient to add all that JavaScript and CSS to the page and not take advantage of the browser's cache. Two techniques are described here that allow you to gain the benefits of inlining, as well as caching external files.

Post-Onload Download

Some home pages, like Yahoo! home page and My Yahoo!, typically have only one page view per session. However, that's not the case for all home pages. Yahoo! Mail is a good example of a home page that often leads to secondary page views (pages that are accessed after the initial page, such as those for viewing or composing email messages).

For home pages that are the first of many page views, we want to inline the JavaScript and CSS for the home page, but leverage external files for all secondary page views. This is accomplished by dynamically downloading the external components in the home page after it has completely loaded (via the onload event). This places the external files in the browser's cache in anticipation of the user continuing on to other pages.

The post-onload download JavaScript code associates the doOnload function with the document's onload event. After a one-second delay (to make sure the page is completely rendered), the appropriate JavaScript and CSS files are downloaded. This is done by creating the appropriate DOM elements (script and link, respectively) and assigning the specific ...

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